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Oils With Benefits...

- Olive oil.
- Canola oil.
- Flaxseed oil.
- Avocado oil.
- Walnut oil.
- Sesame oil.
- Grapeseed oil.

Plan accordingly. I'm mixing a batch up for later .... it's enema Friday!
I think you forgot fish oil

These internet forums lifeblood is Oil threads!!
 

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Oils With Benefits...

- Olive oil.
- Canola oil.
- Flaxseed oil.
- Avocado oil.
- Walnut oil.
- Sesame oil.
- Grapeseed oil.

Plan accordingly. I'm mixing a batch up for later .... it's enema Friday!
On the Moto Guzzi boards we are fond of yak fat. It is better then dino oil or synthetic oil. And it is environmentally friendly. Other than the poop from the yaks.
 

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So I just did my first oil change on my 17 Rubi JKU and I decided to use 5W30 (Pennzoil Platinum ultra). The oil change went without a hitch and I really appreciate the Jeep design as far as placing the oil filter up top in the engine bay, unlike the twist off nonsense that I had to spend almost 30 minutes on each time with my Ram 2500 Cummins.

Anyways just a heads up to anyone debating use of the 5W30, I noticed that my oil pressure is not running at 99 psi when merging onto the freeway at a 6% grade like it used to before, and I noticed that it runs much quieter as well. The other thing that I noticed is that the temperature doesn't seem to sky rocket while idling like it used.

Just my experience in case anyone is debating between the 2. Anyone here have similar input?
yup same here!! Pentastar's where designed for 5w30. Had a 2011 dodge caravan with one of the first pentastars and the oil cap said 5w30 on it!
 
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Oil Threads are great..sometimes.:)

Pennzoil Ultra Platinum 5-30W works great in my 3.6 engine. And yes, the engine is quieter..and no it's not the placebo effect! Try it, you may like it..:happyyes:
 
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The "30" in "5w30" is the hot viscosity. In cold temps 5w20 and 5w30 should have the same viscosity. The difference would be as the oil is warmed up, like in a running engine. The 5w30 should be a little thicker, so it should (as you mentioned) have a slightly higher oil pressure at operating temp.

The only thing I can think of to explain what the OP is saying would be the fact that the Pentastar 3.6 is supposed to have a two stage oil pump set up, where it brings on the second stage when it wants more oil pressure. So the oil pressure can go from around 45 psi to around 90 psi depending on whether or not it is running the second stage oil pump.


Ty


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Hi, ALL
I work in the base oil industry and I had promised myself I would not comment further on the subject in public forums since I already heard so many stupid things about engine oils that I gave up to try to share technical information about this, but I like the theme and the people here seems to be more concerned to share good information than the average.
So, here are my comments:
- the recent reduction of the typical viscosity grade (from 10W30 to 0W20 for example in Honda vehicles) is not because the tolerances/clearances are smaller but because there is a lack of high viscosity base oils since the old refineries (known as Group I refineries, able to produce large amount of high viscosity oils), has being replaced by Group III refineries, that produce high quality base oils by hydrotreatment, but as side effect of this, lower viscosity base oils. The argument that low viscosity oils save fuel is not true since the oil will stay only a few minutes after the start up in low temperature to the low viscosity make some difference. And, especially for the people that live in really hot weather regions, there is the increase of the higher wear when the engine reaches higher temperatures.
There is no problem if the recommended oil for your car is 5W20 for example and, in case you live in a cold climate region, you look for a 0W20 and, in case you live in a hot region, look for a 5W30. In fact , you are creating a reserve of viscosity for eventual extreme temperature conditions.
- regarding synthetic and mineral oils: technically a 5W30 mineral oil is a SAE 5 grade oil with an viscosity improver additive to behave as a SAE 30 oil in high temperatures. On the other hand, a 5W30 synthetic oil, specially a ester-based oil, is a SAE 30 oil with a pour point depressant to work as a SAE 5 oil in low temperatures. At the beginning, there is not working difference between the oils, but in the limit of the use, i.e., when aged, the mineral oil will miss the lubricant capacity in higher temperatures by the consuming of the additive, and the ester-based oil will miss the capacity to works well in low temperatures, with a with an extra aggravating: the oxidation product of the esters are solid compounds and therefore, the oil will increase the viscosity for values above the recommended at the end as well. Of course, nothing of this happens if you change the oils in the recommended periods, and these intervals have a huge margin of safety. My comment is just to you understand how the oils work.
Regarding the API rating: This rating is related to the additive package the oil has, starting the SA, SB reaching the SN grade in the most recent formulations. SA to SH ratings are considered obsolete by API. The best grades in terms of lubricating performance are SJ and SL. The 2 most recent grades (SM and SN) introduced environmental restrictions (regarding greenhouse effect and metallic additives content) so, technically the SM and SN grades are inferior in lubrication performance and better to the environment.
My intention here is not to say what you should do, but just give to you the information for you decide what the best is for your condition, and sorry about the big text. :)
 

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My 2 cents, as an old guy I can tell you on older engines (back in the 70's) we routinely put in higher viscosity oil to increase oil pressure and to quiet engine noise. I ran 20w-50 in my 67 ford 352 with over 100,000 miles. The heavier viscosity really cut down on lifter tap especially at startup. Something to remember, even with the best oil, engines still wear and tolerance still slip over time so a higher viscosity should only help.
 

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Hi, ALL
I work in the base oil industry and I had promised myself I would not comment further on the subject in public forums since I already heard so many stupid things about engine oils that I gave up to try to share technical information about this, but I like the theme and the people here seems to be more concerned to share good information than the average.
So, here are my comments:
- the recent reduction of the typical viscosity grade (from 10W30 to 0W20 for example in Honda vehicles) is not because the tolerances/clearances are smaller but because there is a lack of high viscosity base oils since the old refineries (known as Group I refineries, able to produce large amount of high viscosity oils), has being replaced by Group III refineries, that produce high quality base oils by hydrotreatment, but as side effect of this, lower viscosity base oils. The argument that low viscosity oils save fuel is not true since the oil will stay only a few minutes after the start up in low temperature to the low viscosity make some difference. And, especially for the people that live in really hot weather regions, there is the increase of the higher wear when the engine reaches higher temperatures.
There is no problem if the recommended oil for your car is 5W20 for example and, in case you live in a cold climate region, you look for a 0W20 and, in case you live in a hot region, look for a 5W30. In fact , you are creating a reserve of viscosity for eventual extreme temperature conditions.
- regarding synthetic and mineral oils: technically a 5W30 mineral oil is a SAE 5 grade oil with an viscosity improver additive to behave as a SAE 30 oil in high temperatures. On the other hand, a 5W30 synthetic oil, specially a ester-based oil, is a SAE 30 oil with a pour point depressant to work as a SAE 5 oil in low temperatures. At the beginning, there is not working difference between the oils, but in the limit of the use, i.e., when aged, the mineral oil will miss the lubricant capacity in higher temperatures by the consuming of the additive, and the ester-based oil will miss the capacity to works well in low temperatures, with a with an extra aggravating: the oxidation product of the esters are solid compounds and therefore, the oil will increase the viscosity for values above the recommended at the end as well. Of course, nothing of this happens if you change the oils in the recommended periods, and these intervals have a huge margin of safety. My comment is just to you understand how the oils work.
Regarding the API rating: This rating is related to the additive package the oil has, starting the SA, SB reaching the SN grade in the most recent formulations. SA to SH ratings are considered obsolete by API. The best grades in terms of lubricating performance are SJ and SL. The 2 most recent grades (SM and SN) introduced environmental restrictions (regarding greenhouse effect and metallic additives content) so, technically the SM and SN grades are inferior in lubrication performance and better to the environment.
My intention here is not to say what you should do, but just give to you the information for you decide what the best is for your condition, and sorry about the big text. :)
Great post.

How much of a factor is time, and short drives on functional oil life? I've got a couple of rigs that only see 4k miles per year.

Mark

Sent from my SM-G935V using Tapatalk
 
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If I roll into the dealer (where I prefer to get my service done) and ask them to use 5w30 full synthetic, are they likely to complain?

Are they likely to even have it in stock? (I don't know if there are other Dodge/Chrysler/Jeep vehicles that normally call for 5w30 that they would stock for)
 

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Great post.

How much of a factor is time, and short drives on functional oil life? I've got a couple of rigs that only see 4k miles per year.

Mark
Tks, Mark

A simple question for a not so simple answer due to the variables involved: the mileage of my vehicles is similar and I change the oil every 2 years, but wait.

The oxidation of mineral oils (and synthetics too) at room temperature is no significant (if you leave a can of oil on the shelf, the can will run out before the oil), but the engine is a different environment since you have, in addition to temperature, contaminants being dissolved in the oil all the time.

The question is to quantify the effect of each of the parameters involved:

1) Temperature: I live in a region of very nice climate. The mean summer temperatures are between 66° F and 88° F and in the winter, between 54° and 74° F, ie there is no sub-zero or extremely hot temperatures so, the oil does not overheat with summer peaks and neither is it subjected to arctic conditions. The issue of high temperature is obvious; more temperature, more oxidation. The low temperature is different. At very low temperatures, below -4 F, if the oil already exhibits significant degradation (oxidation + contamination), the pour point depressants may already be depleted and the oil may solidify in the crankcase and precipitation may occur of the contaminants (sludge) and the separation of water eventually dissolved in the oil.
This precipitation can create a corroded area at the bottom of the casing, and when you turn the engine back on, the sludge, water and corrosion will be drawn through the oil pump and can clog conduits and damage the pump itself. Of course, this is an extreme situation, but that is the reason for the recommendation of the oil change every 6 months (with a little help from the Advertising and Marketing staff) ;-)

2) Fuels: Since fuels currently have a very low sulfur content coupled with injection systems, the contribution of fuels to oil degradation is greatly reduced so if you, even running little, have paths that allow the engine to reach normal temperature do not worry about it, but if your typical path is too short, condensation of the steam from the combustion while the engine is still cold will accumulate in the oil and the water helps the precipitation of the sludge (if the oil is already oxidized). A little longer ride once a week prevents this so, do not date the girl next door.
So, if you face rough winter conditions, I suggest you keep the recommended oil change intervals.

I need to admit, before to go for a 2 years interval, I have the advantage to have an oil lab to support my experiments. Initially I checked the oil conditions after one year and further after 2 years. After 2 years the oil was still in fairly decent condition, but I decided not to force it anymore because too much could happen in 3 years.

I hope that, with the information above, you can decide, considering you particular condition, if you can go beyond the 6 months interval or not.
 

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My 2010 Ford Ranger 2.3 runs quieter with 5W30. My 2016 Challenger R/T 5.7 Hemi also runs quieter/no ticking with 5W30. Glad I read that the Jeep 3.6 also runs fine on 5W30. Makes it simple......Pennzoil Platinum 5W30 for eveything.☺
 

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The best option is 3 qts 5w-20 & 3 qts 5w-30 and you end up with 5w-25.
Unfortunately the simple math of averaging doesn't work that way with oil. There is no SAE 5W25 grade, it will either be a 20 grade or a 30 grade oil. There is nothing between 9.3cST where one grade ends and the other grade begins. You are actually better off getting a "thick" 20 grade, or "thin" 30 grade oil than mixing two grades and having something inconsistent and messing with the ad packs of the two different grades.

20-weight viscosity range: 5.6 - 9.3 cSt @100C
30-weight viscosity range: 9.3 - 12.5 cSt @100C

Will mixing the two grades harm your engine? No, but it's really not as good as just running the same oil EG: Pennzoil Ultra, in the same grade. HTH someone.
 

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Unfortunately the simple math of averaging doesn't work that way with oil. There is no SAE 5W25 grade, it will either be a 20 grade or a 30 grade oil. There is nothing between 9.3cST where one grade ends and the other grade begins. You are actually better off getting a "thick" 20 grade, or "thin" 30 grade oil than mixing two grades and having something inconsistent and messing with the ad packs of the two different grades.

20-weight viscosity range: 5.6 - 9.3 cSt @100C
30-weight viscosity range: 9.3 - 12.5 cSt @100C

Will mixing the two grades harm your engine? No, but it's really not as good as just running the same oil EG: Pennzoil Ultra, in the same grade. HTH someone.
Yeah, that was kind of a joke.....:happyyes:
 

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I don't use any of them, but, does anyone use any oil additive like Lucas, and why?
 

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I don't use any of them, but, does anyone use any oil additive like Lucas, and why?
My shop recommended that I run Lucas stabilizer in 09 3.8 because we were trying to stem the oil consumption. Problem I had was that it thickened the oil so much that I had a dry start issue in the morning when it was below freezing. I have been running 0w oils to help that and they have removed that issue. Still going through a quart every 1500 miles but no dry start. 0W-40 in the summer 0w-30 in the spring and fall and 0w-20 in the winter.
 

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Yeah, that was kind of a joke.....:happyyes:
:) I gotcha now! You'd be amazed how many people think they can make their own custom viscosity by mixing different grades.
 

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I have had 4 3.6L wranglers and have used both 5w20 and 5w30 (always pennzoil platinum) and never noticed one iota of difference. My last 3 have had EVIC so I can monitor oil psi and temps etc. drive the same sound the same get the same mpg.
So any 3.6 L jk can use either safely ?
 
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