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I’m having a hard time pinpointing what could be causing slow acceleration and white knuckle steering on my 2013 4door. I’ve had a lift and 35s for 2 years now. Drove great. I added an aftermarket front bumper and winch and it went downhill from there. (Note: rear bumper is still factory. Will change after these issues are resolved). Could be a coincidence, but I’m wondering if anyone else had the same experience after adding these and where I should start to fix this. The acceleration issue is mainly when accelerating to highway speeds. Just feels like my Jeep is ridiculously heavier and have to push on the pedal much further than normal. The steering issue is around 40-50mph. I know this is common, but I didn’t have the issue until adding the extra weight up front.
 

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I’m having a hard time pinpointing what could be causing slow acceleration and white knuckle steering on my 2013 4door. I’ve had a lift and 35s for 2 years now. Drove great. I added an aftermarket front bumper and winch and it went downhill from there. (Note: rear bumper is still factory. Will change after these issues are resolved). Could be a coincidence, but I’m wondering if anyone else had the same experience after adding these and where I should start to fix this. The acceleration issue is mainly when accelerating to highway speeds. Just feels like my Jeep is ridiculously heavier and have to push on the pedal much further than normal. The steering issue is around 40-50mph. I know this is common, but I didn’t have the issue until adding the extra weight up front.
Extra weight, improper gearing, transmission issues, engine issues or any combination can cause loss of acceleration power. Steering issues can be diagnosed by check the track bar, drag link, and tie rods. If those are tight and do not have any play I would also check your ball joints. You can do this by jacking up the wheel and use a lever such as a shovel to pry up on the bottom of the wheel. If you get any up and down movement you will need to replace the ball joints. Not a difficult task if you have the right tools. You do need to pull the axles to do this.



What gears are you running? If you still are running factory gears you also may want to consider a regear. I run 4.56s with my 2014 JKU, AEV bumpers, and 35's. Many go with 4.88s if you live in hill country or pull a trailer this the gearing I would go with.
 

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:welcome: to the Forum..:wavey:
 

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Welcome to the Forum BCurt,

The only thing I can add to what jaysong suggests is check your tire pressure and have an alignment done by a shop that knows how to do alignments on lifted vehicles.
I don't know if JKs have adjustable rear suspension. If they do, ask for a 4 wheel alignment. If the rear isn't adjustable, you want at least a "thrust angle" alignment.
A top quality alignment by a quality shop will cost more than a "tire store" or "franchise muffler store" alignment.
For your situation a "tire store" alignment could easily be a waste of time and money.

A quality wheel alignment includes a close examination of all suspension and steering related parts for wear and/or damage, check/set tire air pressure, a before alignment printout and a final printout.
A visual inspection may not discover damaged suspension components. If you have damaged suspension components, you may get a call while your Jeep is on the alignment machine.
Make sure to tell the service writer or manager why you want an alignment.

One reason for the final printout not to be in spec is the shop called the owner with an estimate of repairs for worn and/or damaged parts and the customer declined. If the customer declined the repairs, a quality shop probably won't do an alignment. There still might be a diagnostic fee for the inspection and perhaps a second charge if they attempted an alignment, found damage and the customer declined. They should still give a preliminary and second unfinished printout.
The only other reason for the final printout to not be in spec is the experienced technician did a preliminary alignment and took the vehicle for a test drive and didn't like how the vehicle drove. Since a lifted vehicle isn't "stock" an experienced technician may have to change the specs to compensate for the lift and to cause the vehicle to drive properly.
Before paying for the alignment, have the manager go with you while you drive the vehicle and you attempt to duplicate the "white knuckle" steering. If it's cured, you can happily pay the bill. If it isn't cured, hopefully whomever drove you to the alignment shop waited for you to come back from the test drive.

My intuition is that you're dealing with two different issues. The white knuckle steering may be what's called "death wobble" or it may be something else, but for safety sake I strongly suggest you get it repaired promptly.
If the sluggish acceleration goes away, then my intuition is wrong, but in any case, get the steering fixed before delving into the sluggish acceleration.

Good Luck, L.M.
 
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