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First ever Jeep- Have a 2015 wrangler manual transmission - I notice the downshift /decel-acceleration pattern that used to work with my VW GTI/Saab stick shifts does not translate with the Jeep - what is approach to curve handling at highway speeds with a manual transmission so I don't feel like I have lost contact with road?
 

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I just slow down.
 
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This ain't no road hugger, ya gotta slow down. What you will also notice is that if you take an off ramp to fast your skid control will kick on, especially if it is a "tight" one with an extreme decreasing radius turn. Slow it down is the best advice you are going to get with this one.
 

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Thanks All...anyone know of a "JK" handling/skills training school in the north east?
 

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Depends if you want understeer or oversteer. Pretty much every car on the road these days is set up to understeer, the Saab like a pig but the GTI much less. The JK is gonna understeer like a mofo, it's a function of physics and suspension set up.

Assuming you are balanced entering the corner you should be in the right gear to hit the apex on your power curve. For a tad more oversteer brake a little harder than you might otherwise and transfer more weight to compress the front suspension, then drive on the throttle: more will push you into understeer, less into oversteer. Lift off too quickly and you will be introduced to 'lift-off oversteer' and the scenery.

The Jeep of course wasn't designed to oversteer and a SWB vehicle will behave badly in such circumstances, but that doesn't mean it can't be done, you just need to be quick and (preferably) not on a public road when you go exploring. Remote, damp traffic circles at dead of night are a reasonable place to explore handling. I say damp because you want your rubber to lose traction before your doorhandles touch the blacktop.

Contrary to popular belief, you drive a vehicle near the limit on the throttle not with the steering wheel.

This is however a bizarre conversation because the vehicle was designed to excel OFF the road... not on! I've completely changed my driving style for the JK and do believe it has made me a better/slower person!
 

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"Contrary to popular belief, you drive a vehicle near the limit on the throttle not with the steering wheel.

This is however a bizarre conversation because the vehicle was designed to excel OFF the road... not on! "

:appl:


IMHO, the most likely result of attempting to achieve on highway throttle-steering skills via interweb instruction of even pristine quality, in any rendition of JK, is weighed heavily toward some kind of catastrophic blunt-force trauma.
 

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Monotube shocks would offer more force on the tires and suspension, to keep the tires in contact with the road.

Front and rear swaybars might help if you have any body roll. (if you don't already have those)

I don't think either of these would prevent you from enjoying your Jeep offroad.

But as others say, you're really limited on what you can do, the whole vehicle was built to excel at what it does, go offroad. :)



...
 

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Driving any high center of gravity vehicle fast around a bend is asking for trouble. Add the fact that the Wrangler suspension doesn't give you a feel for the road at all like a sporty car would. Not even mentioning the awful grip levels of the tires on asphalt. The Wrangler rolls dives and squats terribly compared to anything sporty. It's awful for what you want to do.

Just resist the urge to do it. Take it easy. Arrive alive.
 

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First ever Jeep- Have a 2015 wrangler manual transmission - I notice the downshift /decel-acceleration pattern that used to work with my VW GTI/Saab stick shifts does not translate with the Jeep - what is approach to curve handling at highway speeds with a manual transmission so I don't feel like I have lost contact with road?
The principles are the same as with any other RWD vehicle: you decelerate before entering the curve, and you gently accelerate as you enter.

Unlike a FWD or front-biased AWD, RWD will help actually help you turn when you gradually press on the gas IN the curve. It will seem counterintuitive at first coming from a FWD car, but eventually you get the hang of it.

My first four Wranglers were all stick shifts: they can be surprisingly fun to drive on twisty roads, especially with the stiffer Rubicon suspension.

Good luck and be safe,

Aldo
 

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My Rubicon decelerates quite noticeably when I downshift...as it should given the gearing. I also just don't drive like a moron and find that it handles corners quite well. It's a high center of gravity vehicle known for flipping over when driven by idiots who don't know how to drive sensibly so if you keep that in mind you'll probably be fine.
 
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