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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
for my 2012 JKUR, I am pretty sure I am going to go with the Teraflex 2.5 kit. I know LCA's are highly recommended. I don't want to spend a lot, but I do want a quality LCA. Does anyone have any recommendations on LCA's?
 

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I have that same lift and went with the rancho geo brackets. I am now looking at the synergy fixed arms to upgrade my clearance. They seem to get great reviews. You would do well with any of the well reviewed names. Rock crawler, TF, currie, Metal Cloak. Just look for reviews, there are many on here.
 

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I'm very happy with my Core 4x4 arms. I installed a full set of their Tier 2 configuration arms and found their build quality to be outstanding. With authentic Currie Johnny Joints, solid welds, what is there not to like? I bought my set through Core4x4 on eBay. Go for the full set of 8 arms if you can afford it. You won't be disappointed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Geo brackets are your cheapest option. Next up fixed arms TF or Synergy less then $200 iirc
AOR sells CORE 4x4 adjustables, thats going to be the cheapest adjustable arm.
I think i would rather do the arms than brackets. trying to keep stuff from hanging too far under the jeep.

Fixed vs Adjustable - any difference? I'm not going to go any larger than the 2.5 and 35's.
 

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Aactually, one advantage that's often overlooked is the ability to square the axles to the frame when you use adjustable control arms. Fixed arms are fixed length and can, of course, correct for caster, but only as an estimate based on the approximate lift height. Adjustables do that more precisely, at least potentially, AND can be adjusted independently left and right side to correct for the often meaningful differences in tolerances built into the frame and it's mounting points. When squaring up the axles to the frame, you can find a surprising amount of variation that you can then correct for. Most shops don't do it, but the good ones do. It's worth the extra 30 minutes or so with a tape measure under the jeep getting it dead nuts square and adjusting the control arms to fit when the axles are square to the frame. It'll track better, have better tire wear, and the bushings will last longer because they're under less strain. The same applies for setting the proper lengths for the upper control arms, really. You first get the lower arms installed, squaring the axles to the frame, loosely bolted, not torqued down. THEN you install ONE upper control arm and asjust it for caster in the front axle. When caster is good, you adjust the other side upper control arm to whatever length it needs to be to have the bolt easily go into the mount. This causes the control arms to not be fighting eachother. There's usually a small difference left to right in length, just like in the lowers that you've squared up the axle with. Now, do the same thing for the rear to set your pinion angle. One upper first, find and set the angle, then install the other upper to fit. Now you just torque everything down once the Jeep is down and carrying it's own weight on all four wheels.
 

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Aactually, one advantage that's often overlooked is the ability to square the axles to the frame when you use adjustable control arms. Fixed arms are fixed length and can, of course, correct for caster, but only as an estimate based on the approximate lift height. Adjustables do that more precisely, at least potentially, AND can be adjusted independently left and right side to correct for the often meaningful differences in tolerances built into the frame and it's mounting points. When squaring up the axles to the frame, you can find a surprising amount of variation that you can then correct for. Most shops don't do it, but the good ones do. It's worth the extra 30 minutes or so with a tape measure under the jeep getting it dead nuts square and adjusting the control arms to fit when the axles are square to the frame. It'll track better, have better tire wear, and the bushings will last longer because they're under less strain. The same applies for setting the proper lengths for the upper control arms, really. You first get the lower arms installed, squaring the axles to the frame, loosely bolted, not torqued down. THEN you install ONE upper control arm and asjust it for caster in the front axle. When caster is good, you adjust the other side upper control arm to whatever length it needs to be to have the bolt easily go into the mount. This causes the control arms to not be fighting eachother. There's usually a small difference left to right in length, just like in the lowers that you've squared up the axle with. Now, do the same thing for the rear to set your pinion angle. One upper first, find and set the angle, then install the other upper to fit. Now you just torque everything down once the Jeep is down and carrying it's own weight on all four wheels.
That is exactly how i setup mine. I try and instruct others to as well. I took my lowers and matched them up. Set lengths, Placed arms together so both bolts will slide through the 2 arms. Mounted up the lowers, jack under pinion (front +2 rear -2). Uppers set to match the mount holes ... All 4 bolts slide through easily. I know for sure my rear uppers dont match exactly. All that matters, the axles are square.
Too many people rely on the manufactures numbers. Set and throw the arms in that way.
Sometimes you will see mounts ripped from the housing from the binding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you all for the help. I think i'll look at the adjustables. I appreciate it.
 

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To clarify, you're installing the uppers, one at a time, with the differential supported to control it from tilting, while the weight of the jeep is on all four tires. You raise and lower the jack to correct caster/pinion angle and then install one upper to hold that setting. The other upper you will then install to whatever length is required to have the bolt slide through easily and mount up. Not uncommon to find 1/8" or a bit more difference between the sides, just like the lowers.
 

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To clarify, you're installing the uppers, one at a time, with the differential supported to control it from tilting, while the weight of the jeep is on all four tires. You raise and lower the jack to correct caster/pinion angle and then install one upper to hold that setting. The other upper you will then install to whatever length is required to have the bolt slide through easily and mount up. Not uncommon to find 1/8" or a bit more difference between the sides, just like the lowers.
Rear its a easier to have stands under the axle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
are the Rough Country ones any good, or should I go with the Teraflex LCA's? reason i ask is the rough country are significantly cheaper.
 

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are the Rough Country ones any good, or should I go with the Teraflex LCA's? reason i ask is the rough country are significantly cheaper.
Rough Country generally have a bad reputation. I would steer clear of them. You often get what you pay for, and Rough Country is a good example. If you're looking into adjustables, check out Core4x4 on eBay. Extraordinary value and quality. They offer several build options, from Clevite (OEM style) bushings on both ends, to poly bushings on both ends, to Currie Johnny Joints on one or both ends. Best combination for a street/trail rig would be Johnny Joints on one end and Clevite on the other, in Tier 2 configuration. Good luck!
 

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The Joints on the arms are the key component and RC isn't and never has been in the game when it comes to "good" arms . I prefer Johnny Joints in each end of my lower fronts . They hold the front axle in place better than any other joint you would use on the road plus flex as much as any. Adjustable arms are the only arms I would consider. Our Jeeps evolve to much to pass up the adjustability for a few bucks more .
 

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think about the metalcloak springs since they are progressive. They give a much smoother ride than stock. Go to their website. Drool some. They have a lot of nice options. More expensive than rough country but the kits are well thought out and well constructed. If you're going to do all the work, another 400 to 500 over the cheap kit is likely worth it in the long run.

Prime the components, paint 'em red and they look good too.

It's not just vertical flex but the joints on the arms will rotate further around the long axis than a pressed in bushing when you go through articulation movements. That helps the side-to-side travel without binding up as bad or as easily than the stock, stamped steel arms.
 

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I've been told that arms really don't do that much for flex other than front lowers. Is that true? Is it worth it doing the rest?
The construction of the joint matters a great deal, actually. Assuming the control arms are constructed of the same material, same weld quality, it's all about the joints and their design and composition. Now, Rough Country arms are not in the same league in terms of construction as the top tier arms, and their joints are not anywhere near as good. How the Jeep "rides" is all about the joints. How the arms hold up to abuse is all about the construction of the arms, steel thickness, etc. You'll find lots of people here are big fans of Currie Johnny Joints. For that reason I went with Core4x4 arms with Johnny Joints on one end and Clevite bushings on the other, Tier 2 configuration as the manufacturer calls them.
 

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Not the amount. Only make the suspension work easier without binding.
There is an element of bushing bind in the stock Clevites that I think can keep you from achieving full droop. I know my rear will drop a little more if I sit on the tire and force it... I have to think that it would go on it's own with some high mis-alignment joints.

If you want adjustables, take a good look at the Core 4X4 arms, great stuff at an excellent price.

I run the Synergy fixed arms and I'm a huge fan of their Dual Durometer joint on both ends. 100% no maintenance, high mis-alignment and awesome low NVH performance.
 
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