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I did for a bit for a small lift and bigger tires. Did exactly that. If your think eventually you are going to be offloading also then i wouldn't waste my time or money on it. Because you will then want to put a different lift on.
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the feedback. This is for my fiance's '16 JK unlimited and she wants a larger tire look and the original tires are worn out, so now is the time.
 

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I would say go for it. I don't do any extreme rock crawling but I do offroad quite a bit and I haven't had any problems with the lift. I installed it by myself in my garage and it was a pretty easy install. It does take some time to do it right though.

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I take it the alignment will be affected and need a professional 4 wheel alignment.
Without adding anything beyond what is in that lift you can't adjust anything other than Toe in an alignment. But the numbers you get for Castor (make sure they give you a print out with the numbers for Toe, Camber, and Castor, and that can be useful for deciding if you need to add anything to correct your Castor. As you lift, Castor goes down. Castor is what makes your steering stable. Less Castor means less stability, to put it as simple as possible.
That said, that is a popular lift. But many who use that lift add things. Some add longer sway bar links instead of the cheap brackets it uses for the front sway bar links. Two options, add longer links in back and use the stock rear links up front, or replace the front links with quick disconnect links.
Two options for Castor correction, should you need it, are geometry brackets or longer / adjustable lower front control arms. With a lift that minimal the front lower control arms are pretty popular, but either can work.
When you lift, it will move the steering to one side and it will shift the axles side to side. You simply adjust the drag link to re-center the steering wheel. And the axles shifting will not cause any real issues, but it may bother you aesthetically, in which case you can get adjustable track bars to re-center the axles. Or ignore it as it won't cause any actual problems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Without adding anything beyond what is in that lift you can't adjust anything other than Toe in an alignment. But the numbers you get for Castor (make sure they give you a print out with the numbers for Toe, Camber, and Castor, and that can be useful for deciding if you need to add anything to correct your Castor. As you lift, Castor goes down. Castor is what makes your steering stable. Less Castor means less stability, to put it as simple as possible.
That said, that is a popular lift. But many who use that lift add things. Some add longer sway bar links instead of the cheap brackets it uses for the front sway bar links. Two options, add longer links in back and use the stock rear links up front, or replace the front links with quick disconnect links.
Two options for Castor correction, should you need it, are geometry brackets or longer / adjustable lower front control arms. With a lift that minimal the front lower control arms are pretty popular, but either can work.
When you lift, it will move the steering to one side and it will shift the axles side to side. You simply adjust the drag link to re-center the steering wheel. And the axles shifting will not cause any real issues, but it may bother you aesthetically, in which case you can get adjustable track bars to re-center the axles. Or ignore it as it won't cause any actual problems.
Thanks for the additional info., makes sense knowing what is affected and needs corrected. Not totally following why the axles shift, since nothing will be 'loose'. From my perspective, the spacers are preloading the coils more, causing a higher stance.

Think I'll order this kit, the recommended Teraflex front brake line anchor kit and go from there once I install it to see what tweaks are needed. Add longer sway bars links, adj. track bars, ect. once it's all together. Probably go with longer shocks(assuming +2") when the oem need replaced(75,000mi currently).

With this being her daily driver, trying to achieve a more aggressive look but still be a highway vehicle, similar to what Jeep sells with more $ packages.
 

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Thanks for the additional info., makes sense knowing what is affected and needs corrected. Not totally following why the axles shift, since nothing will be 'loose'. From my perspective, the spacers are preloading the coils more, causing a higher stance.

Think I'll order this kit, the recommended Teraflex front brake line anchor kit and go from there once I install it to see what tweaks are needed. Add longer sway bars links, adj. track bars, ect. once it's all together. Probably go with longer shocks(assuming +2") when the oem need replaced(75,000mi currently).

With this being her daily driver, trying to achieve a more aggressive look but still be a highway vehicle, similar to what Jeep sells with more $ packages.
The suspension on a JK / JKU is a very simple solid axle design. It uses control arms to locate the axles front to back and track bars to locate the axles side to side. Each axle has four control arms working as a set, and one track bar. The track bar works in an arc, so as the axle moves down / away from the chassis it move towards the side of the vehicle the track bar is pivoting on. On the front axle the track bar pivots on the drivers side, so the axle moves towards the drivers side when you lift. The rear axle pivots on the opposite side, and as such moves towards the passenger side when lifting. Most lifts use a rear track bar bracket to change the angle of the rear track bar and thus partially / mostly counter that effect in the rear. But due to the steering and the way it works up front you can only change the front track bar if you also change the drag link (the two must remain parallel or you end up with bump steer).
Anyway, as you lift your Jeep the front axle moves towards the drivers side and the rear axle moves towards the passenger side. Also, the front axle moves slightly reward and the rear axle moves slightly forwards, because the control arms also move in an arc. If you lift enough it is common to use longer control arms to re-center your axle front to back to counter that effect as well. But I reckon that is beyond where you are going.
Additionally, standard MO is to loosen up the pivot points when you install a lift. That is because most of the pivot points (track bar, control arms) use rubber type bushings that have a "center" and you want that "center" to be at ride height under the weight of the vehicle. So you loosen the pivot points (it will also make it easier to extend the suspension far enough to install the spacers easier), install the spacers, then with the vehicle wheels on the ground and the weight of the vehicle on them you torque the pivot points to the required tightness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Now I'm following the axle shift from increasing the height(arc). This will be my first lift, so trying to educate myself so as not to cause problems. Appreciate the in-depth information/heads up install tips. Will probably get adjustable track bars later, the offset will probably bug both of us.lol
 

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I have installed no less than 10 AEV 2" lifts and they work great and other than centering the steering wheel not much else has needed to be done. I personally would pick up a set of oem rear swaybar links to use instead of the wonky front swaybar link brackets but other than that they are well thought out.
 

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Just my opinion, if you are only looking to fit 33"s then you could just go with a leveling kit and save some $$. If you decide in the future to run bigger tires, you didn't sink too much into it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The AEV kit arrived today, everything makes more sense after reading through the directions. I take it most go for the level stance vs the factory rake, by removing the rear stock spacer. With the rake purpose being for towing application. It'll be a week before I have a chance to do this project. After that, I'm going with Cooper AT3 4S P285/70R-17 on and get it aligned.
 

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I went for the rake and mine looks like it sits fairly level. I also have a 35 inch spare, aev tire carrier, and fuel caddy. I dont have a winch or anything on the front so that might be why.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I installed the kit last Saturday and had new tires put on today. Left both stock coil spacers in with the rear only ending up a 1/4" higher. Definitely the beefier stance we were looking for. The Teraflex brake line anchors are the way to go in the front. Here are some numbers of the difference in height: AEV kit with stock tires front +2.5"/rear +1.75" from stock, lift & tires front +3.25"/rear +2.5" from stock. Appreciate all the input!
 
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