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Discussion Starter #1
So I am getting a low charge code and my aftermarket voltage gauge says I am only charging at about 13.1 volts. Sooo.....

If I am going to have to replace the alternator, I figured I might as well upgrade to an aftermarket. Currently run a single AGM battery but the plans are to eventually go to a dual setup.

For those of you that have upgraded who did you go with, why, and what has your experience been with the upgrade?

I have done a little research and will probably go to something in the 240 amp range.

Looked at Mean Green-Seems high for an extra 40 amps.

Singer-Options up to 300 amps, seem to have a few quality issues.

Mechman-some quality issues.


Any other higher amp alternators I should look at?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Do you need the higher current? Have a lot of accessories? If not, stay stock.
Not a ton of accessories, but plan on adding the 2nd batt and a fridge at some point.

Nothing set in stone, but not something I am well versed in. Ive always just gone with the autozone replacement in the past. I've always pretty much considered them disposable.
 

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Stay stock as the more power the alternator produces the more force is required to turn it which means belt slippage and premature belt and pulley wear and possible fail. also most of the high output alternator's require higher RPM for max output, this requires higher engine RPM or smaller belt pulley [see 1st listed problem].
The oem alternator is more than enough to maintain 2 battery's with power to spare.
 

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Stay stock as the more power the alternator produces the more force is required to turn it which means belt slippage and premature belt and pulley wear and possible fail. also most of the high output alternator's require higher RPM for max output, this requires higher engine RPM or smaller belt pulley [see 1st listed problem].
The oem alternator is more than enough to maintain 2 battery's with power to spare.
Alternator only produces more power if there is a higher draw. A 240A unit requires no more force than a 87A unit if the draw is only 20A.

My comments are in respect to cost, why spend extra money if there is no need. With no extra load a 240A unit does nothing except cost more.

Now with a second battery and a fridge, it might be needed.
 

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Alternator only produces more power if there is a higher draw. A 240A unit requires no more force than a 87A unit if the draw is only 20A.

My comments are in respect to cost, why spend extra money if there is no need. With no extra load a 240A unit does nothing except cost more.

Now with a second battery and a fridge, it might be needed.
Agreed. My '96 Land Cruiser came with "only" an 80 amp. alternator. I ran dual batts. fridge, compressor, winch. Never had an issue in over 6 years. My fridge draws around 3-5 amps once it's cooled down. My PUMA compressor pulls a max of 40 amps. Granted, the winch can pull ~150+ amps under full load, but how often do you put it under that high a load and for how long?
 

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A couple of points if thinking about going with a larger alternator. The first is you will need to upgrade your wiring. The stock wiring IMO is to small. The second would be if you are going to go with Genesis Dual Battery setup the Smart Isolator is only rated to 200 amps.

I am always one who always goes bigger than what is needed and will probably upgrade to a 200 amp alternator when mine craps out. But from what I have seen it is not really needed. With my setup I can watch the charge state. At idle with everything turned on, minus the winch and that includes a 1000w stereo at full blast it took over 15 minutes to lose a tenth of a volt out of one of the batteries. But how often would that be the case.
 
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