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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a stupid question I should know but do not. I just bought a full garage. I have a 100 Gallon air compressor with steel lines and multiple hookups along the walls. To go with this I bought a 50ft Goodyear 1/2" ID air hose with MNPT threads so I can go anywhere in my garage with my airtools without losing pressure or running out of line. What is driving me nuts though is the way these are measured. It says the fitting is 1/2", but that is the ID, not the OD. The OD is probably closer to 3/4". When I look up adapters to connect my industrial ends it seems like they are 1/2" to 3/8" or 1/2" to 1/4" adapter. When I look closer it looks like the 1/2" on the adapters I see are to accept a 1/2" male adapter with the 1/2" being the OD not the ID. So what adapters do I need to connect one end to my air tools with the quick release, and the other end to my air lines on the walls? My air lines on the walls are all quick release, so I need to put a male end on that side. Here is a link to the hose I got.

Normally for something like this I would just take my hose to a store and start screwing things together to find the right adapter, but I dont have any stores near me that have those parts.

GOODYEAR 46562 1/2-Inch by 50-Feet 300 PSI Rubber Air Hose With 1/2-Inch MNPT Ends - Amazon.com
 

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The link is for 1/2" Male National Pipe Thread (MNPT or MPT), so your hose should have dual male ends (threads on outside). The matching piece for the threads would be a 1/2" FNPT (or usually just FPT). You must also select the one which will properly adapt to your air tool, which will depend on what you already have in it (if you do).

http://www.amazon.com/Interstate-Pn...al-Coupler/dp/B0039AOLSK/ref=pd_bxgy_hi_img_y

That is an example of what you want on the wall and one end of your hose.

http://www.amazon.com/Interstate-Pn...al-Coupler/dp/B0039J5E8W/ref=pd_bxgy_hi_img_y

This would go on the other end of the hose, and is how the hose connects to the wall.

http://www.amazon.com/Interstate-Pn...al-Coupler/dp/B0039JE5U0/ref=pd_bxgy_hi_img_z

This would go in the tool itself and work with the hose adaptor above.

If that doesn't help, I'm not sure I get the question. Btw, make sure your 'T' fittings on the wall are upside down, it will limit water flowing into your tools and help it flow back to the tank, where it can be drained.



Hoses, tubes, and pipes are all measured and sold by different standards, and there is about 4 common thread types in the US. It can be a chore.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Man you gave me great advice. I wish I had waited for someone to answer before I went and bought the wrong part. Oh well, $20 mistake. I will; be buying what you recommended now. And now I know the difference. Thanks
 

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My pleasure. Must be a pretty awesome shop with 100g capacity, you can 'cfm' your heart out, lol.

I used to be a tool dealer for one of the big 3, so I had to know that stuff. If ya have any other questions, just ask. :)
 

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Harbor Freight has a decent selection of pneumatic supplies, there is a few in and around Philly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
My pleasure. Must be a pretty awesome shop with 100g capacity, you can 'cfm' your heart out, lol.

I used to be a tool dealer for one of the big 3, so I had to know that stuff. If ya have any other questions, just ask. :)
Yeah it is a pretty good shop. It came with a detached house! LOL At least thats how I look at it, the wife sees things a little differently.

As far as Harbor Freight, I try to avoid them, unless I dont care about the part breaking or being of low quality.
 

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Yeah it is a pretty good shop. It came with a detached house! LOL At least thats how I look at it, the wife sees things a little differently.

As far as Harbor Freight, I try to avoid them, unless I dont care about the part breaking or being of low quality.
Good perspective.

I figured there was some reason a 100g was there - lifts make things easy. Now just wait until the inlaws see your nicely set up professional shop. :rofl: :hide:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Do you happen to know anything about these air powered hydraulic lifts? I haven't been able to find out any good details on these. Looks like no safety mechanism unless it is all the way up. I am thinking I should put something under it when I have it up just in case, but I don't know. I know these were around for a very long time so if I follow the same rules mechanics did working on these I will be fine. I just dont know if there is stuff I don't know about this style lift. I have only used two post up until now.
 

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Do you happen to know anything about these air powered hydraulic lifts? I haven't been able to find out any good details on these. Looks like no safety mechanism unless it is all the way up. I am thinking I should put something under it when I have it up just in case, but I don't know. I know these were around for a very long time so if I follow the same rules mechanics did working on these I will be fine. I just dont know if there is stuff I don't know about this style lift. I have only used two post up until now.
I use the air lift every time I do work to my jeep. I part-own a oil shop/mechanic shop and I have access to one when ever I need it. Lifting a jeep on one is probably the hardest thing to lift, since you only get a couple inches on each side to hold it on the frame. For the first couple feet of lift, you should adjust it, and once your jeep hits about 3 feet off the ground, give it a good shake and you will hear a snap noise which means the lift is settled and your good to go up. My jeep, at least, is always kinda shakey when I have it all the way up, especially when I was tearing off my exhaust last week, but it's pretty safe. . Never had an issue with the 5 years of me using it. Just remember, slow and adjust, and keep it level..
 

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As a matter of fact... (lol)

The single post x-mount types are certainly better than the 2 post v-mount because the arms don't lock into place on either and the v-type swing out way too easily (I saw 3 come down at 9.8m/sec/sec, if ya know what I mean). So be VERY careful to set the arms correctly, and double check all 4 are set each time (saw guys use 3 and not realize it until the car was at 6'). Of course, we also used to set the pins up too high and wedge them with a little piece of metal so there was NO safety at all, and I actually saw more problems with hydrolic 2-posts than our lifts leaking down. Those clickity-clacks make you so crazy you bungee the safety away then leave something under the vehicle. In the morning you see what won, an upside down vehicle or a squished rollcart / table / whatever. These are pretty unlikely scenerios, though. As stated, always - ALWAYS - give er a good shake at 6"-24".

Best thing? Raise it all the way up and set the pins at the end of the day, or lower it back down (even setting the whip or lift frame on some old rims). Then the pressure of the hydro-tank (read seals) is not holding up the vehicle for 12hrs+ unattended. And you're right, they used them everywhere up until the early 80s, I used em 15 years ago, and they still make em today. If it ain't broke...

Did you have any particular questions before I ramble on about lifts? Lmao.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the info guys. I guess what it is I am worried about is mechanical failure of the lift. I am guessing since it is hydraulic, even if someone hit the airline hard enough to break all the pressure out of the lift it would still take 10 sec or so to fall? Also, do I just open the big screw in the center of it and add hydraulic fluid? It hadnt been run in a long time before I bought it. As expected some moisure had collected in the lines, and the brunt of what I could not drain went into the lift. It also makes a bubble noise for a second when I first start lifting it up.

I am guessing where I am putting the pads to lift is a good spot? I shook the hell out of it a few inches off the ground, and then a little higher. It didnt budge at all. If you notice I have a crossmember for my traction bar in the rear, so putting the pads on the frame there is not an option. Plus, they kinda lock into where I have them a little better I think.
 

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I'd need a bit more info on which lift that is to be certain, but...
It has its own air holding tank. It fills with probably 35 gallons or so when you charge the tank (on most units). This pushes on probably 55+ gallons of hydraulic fluid to raise the lift when you push on the lever by allowing those 35 gallons to go into the lift. When you stop pressing the handle, the seal closes between the lift and the tank. The lift is then being held up by the hydraulics and air up to that seal, but not the air tank or the main compressor. When you flip the valve on the control it allows the ~35gal tank to empty, then pressing the lever allows the air trapped in the lift to escape back into the holding tank, lowering the lift.

Some units stab a rod through the anti-swivel rod (that aligator tooth thing) as a safety, most have a little pin or plate that drops at full or near full height. Usually when a seal fails with no safety, it will take hours for the vehicle to reach the ground. The biggest issue there is when things are left underneath, like pole jacks, work tables, etc. A pole jack under the chunk is a bad thing wihout safety pins, trust me. :)

I never saw an inground lift suffer immediate and catastrophic failure, only seals leaking or people setting cars improperly and droping em. That happens way more often than you'd think, btw.

Iirc, most fill under the centerplate in a little tube. Jack points look ok from my tiny screen; shake em shake em. Sadly I think your bubbling is water in the air/hydraulic part, and I don't think that is good, but I am not sure about what is causing that bubbling.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
So I got the adapters you told me to get. They are perfect. Nice and large and fit the hose. Now the problem I have is that I also got some 1/2"-3/8" adapter for the air hose thinking I could adapt it when needed to the old couplers. I was wrong. I am guessing the old couplers are actually 1/4" since none of them fit my 3/8" NPT adapter. So I think the 1/2"-1/4" adapters would work, but after all of this trouble I am just going to say screw it. Can you tell by this pic of the fitting on the pipe what type of threads these would be or if there is anything special in regards to what I need to buy in order to fit the 1/2" industrial couplers to this pipe? I figure at this poitn I will just switch everything over to the 1/2" and get a couple of adapters for anything smaller I work with.

I figured I would include a pic of the compressor. I just climbed up on top of my bathroom last night where it is to get a good look at it. Seems I have a Quincy 310 2 Stage compressor. My guess is that the tank is 80 Gallons. The motor looks to have been replaced and is a 2HP. I have no idea what kind of maintenance I should do to this thing. I did get some air tool oil and stuff. It does have a drain for moisture, which unfortunatly seems to need it. The first time I powered it up quite a bit of water was in the lines. Every time I open the drain moisture comes out no matter how many times I drain it. I know there are dryer things, I am just not sure where I put it.

Soooo many questions. LOL
 

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So I got the adapters you told me to get. They are perfect. Nice and large and fit the hose. Now the problem I have is that I also got some 1/2"-3/8" adapter for the air hose thinking I could adapt it when needed to the old couplers. I was wrong. I am guessing the old couplers are actually 1/4" since none of them fit my 3/8" NPT adapter. So I think the 1/2"-1/4" adapters would work, but after all of this trouble I am just going to say screw it. Can you tell by this pic of the fitting on the pipe what type of threads these would be or if there is anything special in regards to what I need to buy in order to fit the 1/2" industrial couplers to this pipe? I figure at this poitn I will just switch everything over to the 1/2" and get a couple of adapters for anything smaller I work with.

I figured I would include a pic of the compressor. I just climbed up on top of my bathroom last night where it is to get a good look at it. Seems I have a Quincy 310 2 Stage compressor. My guess is that the tank is 80 Gallons. The motor looks to have been replaced and is a 2HP. I have no idea what kind of maintenance I should do to this thing. I did get some air tool oil and stuff. It does have a drain for moisture, which unfortunatly seems to need it. The first time I powered it up quite a bit of water was in the lines. Every time I open the drain moisture comes out no matter how many times I drain it. I know there are dryer things, I am just not sure where I put it.

Soooo many questions. LOL
I would change the oil in the compressor yearly and change the V-belt yearly or as soon as you see a crack.
If that lift is as old as it looks, swap out the hydraulic fluid.
See is that compressor motor has any overload protection. If not call an electrician to check it all out.
You can buy an automatic air blowdown from Grainger for about $50. But I would just blow it down at the start of the work day. I assume you won't be running it non-stop.
For your air tools you can buy a filter to catch all the rust in that line. You can also buy an auto-oiler, but if its only used part time I would stick with an oiler that goes on the airline as you use the tool.

Lastly I've seen only 1 air over oil lift fail with no warning. That was a ruptured air line into the hydraulic tank. She dropped in about 5 seconds as the safety's were not in place.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Now I dont feel paranoid. I did pickup a 5ft piece of lumber that is about 10"X10" or more and weighs a ton. I am going to be putting it under my lift when working on it just to be safe.

So how much is it going to cost me to do the hydraulic fluid? And as far as the oil change for the compressor what do I use? I am assuming with regular maintence it will last a long time. As far as the overload protecting it is on its own fused box, as well as it is run off a breaker in my box. The electrical I am able to take care of fortunately. I have actually spend the past few weeks completely rewiring my new home.

I will have to look into theses oilers. And what the hell is an automatic blowdown?

It is funny I have been using air tools quite a bit, but never had my own compressor, not even a small one. I always used my father in Law's who has one about the same size as what I have now.
 

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It looks to me like you have maybe 1 1/4 or 1 1/2 pipe, with a plug down to 1/2, maybe 5/8, npt that the coupler is sticking out of. Sound about right? (There isn't any scale :/ ) You can always pull the coupler and head up to the big box store, they have a display of threads and such, as do some local friendly hardware stores or auto stores. It'll help you determine exact thread pitch and dia. It looks like a pretty standard AHC (Automatic Hose Coupling), but there are about 4 commonly used ones.

Your oil should be just good oil, unless the manufacturer calls for something different. No magic anything typically.

Your fluid will probably be a few bucks, those things hold a lot of fluid. Probably looking at something like a 55 gallon drum, but you may want to try and track down maker/model first to find out. I'm just not familiar enough with exchanging the fluid.

Never heard em called auto blowdowns, but I think y'all are talking about automatic compressor drains, or "pneumatic auto drains". They automatically empty the compressor of built up moisture at a determined level (instead of you having to drain the tank). An air dryer is a little different, it either sits adjacent (down stream) from the tank or at the end of the lines and removes moisture from the lines themselves before it can enter the tool. If you plan to paint, you'll need both.

If you do not use your tools often, oil them LAST. Oil em, blast them two or three quick bursts, then put them away. This coats the internals with oil before storage, when 75% of all air tool failure occurs (because of rust pitting). It won't hurt em to oil em first, but by the time you are done, they have no oil. If you work in a shop, oil em Friday or Saturday afternoon at quitin time.
 

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Now I dont feel paranoid. I did pickup a 5ft piece of lumber that is about 10"X10" or more and weighs a ton. I am going to be putting it under my lift when working on it just to be safe.

So how much is it going to cost me to do the hydraulic fluid? And as far as the oil change for the compressor what do I use? I am assuming with regular maintence it will last a long time. As far as the overload protecting it is on its own fused box, as well as it is run off a breaker in my box. The electrical I am able to take care of fortunately. I have actually spend the past few weeks completely rewiring my new home.

I will have to look into theses oilers. And what the hell is an automatic blowdown?

It is funny I have been using air tools quite a bit, but never had my own compressor, not even a small one. I always used my father in Law's who has one about the same size as what I have now.
Grainger sells them, you pipe it i to your tank drain and plug it in. You then set for time between activation and duration.
 

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