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Hey Fellas I put on new:

- Teraflex HD ball joints
- RE Forged Adj trackbar
- RE steering stabilizer/bracket/bolts
- MOOG tie-rod
- MOOG drang-link

I took it to Firestone to get an alignment, its way better now then it was when I was done but it still feels a little weird, maybe it need to break in.

HOWEVER, Firestone could not align the castor on one side, its in the "red" do I need to upgrade something to get this aligned correctly?
 

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Hey Fellas I put on new:

- Teraflex HD ball joints
- RE Forged Adj trackbar
- RE steering stabilizer/bracket/bolts
- MOOG tie-rod
- MOOG drang-link

I took it to Firestone to get an alignment, its way better now then it was when I was done but it still feels a little weird, maybe it need to break in.

HOWEVER, Firestone could not align the castor on one side, its in the "red" do I need to upgrade something to get this aligned correctly?
There are different ways to be able to adjust caster. The two common options are adjustable or longer lower front control arms or geometry brackets.
How much lift, if any, do you have?
For Jeeps with no lift you should not need to adjust caster, but if you do I would suggest adjustable lower front control arms. For Jeeps with lift, geometry brackets become an option. As you lift, not only does caster decrease but control arm angle increases. That reduces the ability of the front control arms to freely allow suspension travel over bumps. Geometry brackets restore the original angle of the control arms, which is near horizontal, in addition to allowing you to adjust caster.
So, with a lifted Jeep you can add longer or adjustable lower front control arms or you can add geometry brackets. It is even possible to run both adjustable arms and geometry brackets. But that is getting into the deep end of the pool.
For adjustable arms, I am running the TF Alpine arms, but I really like the Core 4x4 arms and kinda wish I had gone with them. The Alpine arms are pretty easy to adjust, however, and get the node there.
For geometry brackets the Rancho's are top of the heap.
 

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I have a 2" spacer lift with 35's but expect to upgrade to a real suspension lift sometime soon. Can you provide a link to the adjustable control arms or brackets you are referring to, is it something like this;

https://www.extremeterrain.com/tera...justable-flexarm-kit-for-03-lift-0718-jk.html
This should get you started-
https://www.allensoffroad.com/suspension-systems-lift-kits/Core-4X4-Control-Arms

https://www.allensoffroad.com/suspension-systems-lift-kits/rancho-suspenion/RS62103
 

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I have a 2" spacer lift with 35's but expect to upgrade to a real suspension lift sometime soon. Can you provide a link to the adjustable control arms or brackets you are referring to, is it something like this;

https://www.extremeterrain.com/tera...justable-flexarm-kit-for-03-lift-0718-jk.html
That is close but not quite.
An option for the brackets would be
https://www.northridge4x4.com/part/...ncho-control-arm-geometry-correction-brackets
While adjustable lower front control arms can be had at the Allens Off Road sire as linked previously or you could go with something from TeraFlex but like this
https://www.northridge4x4.com/part/control-arms/1415500-teraflex-alpine-front-lower-flexarm-kit
I do like the Core4x4 arms from Allen. But I will admit that the Alpine arms from TF are easier to adjust. Synergy adjustable arms are also on the easy side to adjust.
https://www.northridge4x4.com/part/...facturing-adjustable-control-arms-front-lower
But they are expensive, even compared to TeraFlex Alpine arms. And the Apline arms have what I think is a nicer adjustment system.

I want to point out, the Rancho brackets are also adjustable, they have four different holes you can use for the upper arms. Each set of holes for the upper arms gives you a different amount of additional caster from stock. The brackets will typically give you a better ride quality as they not only adjust caster they also improve the control arm angle. The angle of the control arms should be near horizontal. As you lift the control arm angle gets steeper. That increased angle requires more force to compress the suspension, so the ride becomes less compliant. The geometry brackets restore the control arm angle to near horizontal, and thus return the suspension compliance to near stock levels. It will be less of a difference with a 2" lift, but if you intend to go with more lift down the road you may want to consider the brackets.
 

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That is close but not quite.
An option for the brackets would be
https://www.northridge4x4.com/part/...ncho-control-arm-geometry-correction-brackets
While adjustable lower front control arms can be had at the Allens Off Road sire as linked previously or you could go with something from TeraFlex but like this
https://www.northridge4x4.com/part/control-arms/1415500-teraflex-alpine-front-lower-flexarm-kit
I do like the Core4x4 arms from Allen. But I will admit that the Alpine arms from TF are easier to adjust. Synergy adjustable arms are also on the easy side to adjust.
https://www.northridge4x4.com/part/...facturing-adjustable-control-arms-front-lower
But they are expensive, even compared to TeraFlex Alpine arms. And the Apline arms have what I think is a nicer adjustment system.

I want to point out, the Rancho brackets are also adjustable, they have four different holes you can use for the upper arms. Each set of holes for the upper arms gives you a different amount of additional caster from stock. The brackets will typically give you a better ride quality as they not only adjust caster they also improve the control arm angle. The angle of the control arms should be near horizontal. As you lift the control arm angle gets steeper. That increased angle requires more force to compress the suspension, so the ride becomes less compliant. The geometry brackets restore the control arm angle to near horizontal, and thus return the suspension compliance to near stock levels. It will be less of a difference with a 2" lift, but if you intend to go with more lift down the road you may want to consider the brackets.
The synergy arms are stout, easy to install, quiet, and held up well for a few years in the rusty northeast for me. Reviews have been positive. I liked their bushings and the ease of the clamping mechanism, plus the finish is well done. A lot more robust than stock, they do weigh about 50% more.
 
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