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I recently had an issue with my battery/alternator in my jeep and I replaced both of them. During the issue I noticed my amp was in protection but I thought once the issue was fixed, the amp would go back to normal. I was playing around with the wires and I noticed when I disconnected the amp wires that run to my head unit the amp would turn "off" but as soon as I reconnected them it would be back on. Amp is a Boss 1000W amp.Any suggestion on how to diagnose and fix would be appreciated. Thanks.
 

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So you're saying that after your new battery/alternator, your amp is always in protection as long as it is connected to power?

Check your connections. Unless the amp has a valid service issue, my first guess would be that you may have some speaker wires pinched or shorted together that causes it to go into protection.
 

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So you're saying that after your new battery/alternator, your amp is always in protection as long as it is connected to power?

Check your connections. Unless the amp has a valid service issue, my first guess would be that you may have some speaker wires pinched or shorted together that causes it to go into protection.
It went into protection because of the battery was bad/shorted and wouldn't put out enough or too many volts. I expected it to go out of protection when the issue was fixed. I'll check the wires and see but I don't think they would have been pinched anywhere
 

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Thanks for the additional info. Assuming nothing has changed with your wiring, I would bet that your amp is bad. I would hope that a bad electrical system condition would blow a fuse instead of toasting the amp, but not knowing how you have it installed, or how the amp implements protection, I'm leaning towards ....toast. Boss is a budget brand and that isn't always bad, but it may not be as hearty of a design as other amps.

I have a 12v power supply that I bought 30 years ago for super cheap. I use it for these cases to bench test an amp. If you have one or know someone who does, this would be your next step to be sure. Basically you would plug a home CD player into the amp and use its gain as a volume control to a small pair of speakers. If it still goes into protection then the amp is bad. Otherwise your Jeep install is suspect.
 

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There is normally a thick monster power cable going from the battery to the amp, and there is normally an in line fuse on that cable to protect the amp. If there is no in line fuse then, your amp is probably fried. Some amps also have a fuse on the amp itself. I would check those two fuses. Also, if your amp is going into "protection mode" regularly, then it is likely a heating problem. I had this problem with a budget amp myself. What I found out is that the speaker wire polarity and the RCA wires polarity, can cause the amp to heat up, and go into protection mode. It is also recommended to use larger gauge wires. Once I ran all new large gauge speaker wires, and made sure my amp was "in phase", and all the polarities correct, I didn't heat up and go into protection mode as much. I also got rid of the budget amp, which are know to have heat issues, and I got an Alpine amp, which is known to run cool. I no longer have heat issues, nor does my amp go into protection mode. You can check your amp periodically for heat by placing your hand on top of it when it goes into protection mode. Good Luck.
 

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There is normally a thick monster power cable going from the battery to the amp, and there is normally an in line fuse on that cable to protect the amp. If there is no in line fuse then, your amp is probably fried. Some amps also have a fuse on the amp itself. I would check those two fuses. Also, if your amp is going into "protection mode" regularly, then it is likely a heating problem. I had this problem with a budget amp myself. What I found out is that the speaker wire polarity and the RCA wires polarity, can cause the amp to heat up, and go into protection mode. It is also recommended to use larger gauge wires. Once I ran all new large gauge speaker wires, and made sure my amp was "in phase", and all the polarities correct, I didn't heat up and go into protection mode as much. I also got rid of the budget amp, which are know to have heat issues, and I got an Alpine amp, which is known to run cool. I no longer have heat issues, nor does my amp go into protection mode. You can check your amp periodically for heat by placing your hand on top of it when it goes into protection mode. Good Luck.
Just a small clarification, the in-line fuse is to protect the wiring not the amp.
 

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It went into protection because of the battery was bad/shorted and wouldn't put out enough or too many volts.
Shorting it couldn't make the battery put out too many volts and not enough volts wouldn't cause it to go into protection mode.

Do you by any chance have speakers connected in parallel with each other? If they are, that could definitely cause the amp to go into protection mode if their resulting halved impedances are too low for the amplifier's design or settings.
 

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These steps will help isolate the source of the amp going into protection.

Disconnect the load (ie...whatever speakers the amp is connected to)
Turn on jeep/radio, if the amp powers on as normal, the problem is in your speakers. Improper ohm load, blown speaker that has created a dead short, etc. Power different speaker/s to confirm.
If the problem continues

Remove the input signal (RCA’s or high level input wires)
Turn on jeep/radio, If the amp powers on as normal, the problem is coming from the signal side, too much/too little voltage on the input side can put some amps into protection.

If the problem continues, the amp will probably need to be replaced.
 
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