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I have the JKURX 2014. It claims to have "performance" suspension though I don't know exactly how it differs from any other JK suspension. I can only tell you I like it a lot. The combination of suspension and tires is very, very nice.

Seriously, I am having a hard time lifting it (~2.5" lift and 35"). I worry it would lessen the DD ride quality.
 

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I enjoy it as well! I added a heavy front bumper and still it rides nearly the same. The only time I'll be upgrading is when my stock tires need to be replaced.
 

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Paul, why would you want to lift it? I know "lifting" is a knee-jerk reaction. And if you just want the look of a lifted jeep, more power to you. But unless you are running into off-road situations you can't conquer in your stock JKURX, and where the extra 1.5" of clearance you'd get from 35" tires will suddenly make all the difference, there's no need at all to do so.

Now, unlike you, I come from a place where the stock suspension on a Wrangler seems like absolute crap, but a lift and larger tires will only serve to make that worse. The truck wallows all over the road, floats and dives and bounces over every bump, leans like it's going to scrape its door handles going around curves. My steering inputs have only the most casual relationship with the direction of travel.

But all of those traits are necessary (apparently) if I'm to enjoy the truck's off-road prowess, which is why I bought it and what I'm doing with it. Having a blast.

But the last thing I want to do is make its on-road behavior any worse if I don't need to. If I did anything to it, it would be to replace the shocks (without lifting the truck) with a set that controls damping much better than the red Rubicon units my Willys came with. But I'm not to that point right now.

Cheers!
 

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Now, unlike you, I come from a place where the stock suspension on a Wrangler seems like absolute crap, but a lift and larger tires will only serve to make that worse. The truck wallows all over the road, floats and dives and bounces over every bump, leans like it's going to scrape its door handles going around curves. My steering inputs have only the most casual relationship with the direction of travel.
Have you driven a lifted Jeep. I would argue mine handles BETTER with the lift, less body roll, doesnt wallow any more than stock and stearing crispness hasnt seemed to suffer the least.

The only negative I have noticed is that the small bumps arent absorbed quite as much but that could also largely be due to the fact that larger tires often have a higher load rating and thus stiffer sidewalls.

PaulMcHale, the best thing I can do is recommend you try and track down some fellow jeepers in your area or a good shop with some test vehicles and take some different lifts on a short test drive and judge for yourself. Not all lifts degrade handling, many actually improve it.
 

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I've got the Moab (Sahara based), but the suspension is a pretty good dual purpose component. I have steel bumpers and rails and I recently added a front winch. With the added weight, my springs are now overly compressed and it's time to upgrade the springs and shocks. I will be adding a modest lift for modest tires, but I'm likely to go with the RK 1.5 or AEV 2.5 as the on road handling will be improved or the same as stock.

For those that are only interested in improved ground clearance, I'd highly recommend a 255/80/17 tire from BFG (KM2 MT) or Cooper (Discoverer Maxx AT). This will add about a half inch of clearance as it's a 33, and no other upgrades are required since it is the same width as factory.
 

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Have you driven a lifted Jeep. I would argue mine handles BETTER with the lift, less body roll, doesnt wallow any more than stock and stearing crispness hasnt seemed to suffer the least.

The only negative I have noticed is that the small bumps arent absorbed quite as much but that could also largely be due to the fact that larger tires often have a higher load rating and thus stiffer sidewalls.

PaulMcHale, the best thing I can do is recommend you try and track down some fellow jeepers in your area or a good shop with some test vehicles and take some different lifts on a short test drive and judge for yourself. Not all lifts degrade handling, many actually improve it.
As I indicated, improvements in body control could definitely be made by substitution of the shocks for better damped units. Your lift kit most likely includes better shocks.

But every single thing about the process of lifting a vehicle diminishes its road manners. Check out every single road-racing vehicle in the history of road-racing. Check out the best-engineered luxury cars out there.

Lifting raises the center of gravity. It lengthens suspension travel. It lengthens the various polar moments of suspension pieces, increasing the leverage (force) which the body uses against the frame to "wallow." If better shocks are used they can hide or cover up these inherent failings of a lifted vehicle, BUT (and here's the important part): the same shocks fitted to a stock (lower) ride-height Wrangler will make an even greater improvement in on-road handling. And if compared to the lifted Jeep, you would be able to tell that the lower one (with improved shocks) handles better on-road.
 

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But every single thing about the process of lifting a vehicle diminishes its road manners. Check out every single road-racing vehicle in the history of road-racing. Check out the best-engineered luxury cars out there.
IF engineering dynamics were the only factor then I totally agree with you. However, as you yourself highlighted, the quality of the parts used are a huge piece of the puzzle.

Raise a vehicle with superior components and you can have all the same manner (or better) than stock. Add in the fact the often increased wheel offset, wider tires/wheels and you actually have, even with the higher center of gravity, a vehicle that is less susceptible to rollovers etc.
 

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I don't know about the 2014 suspension but man I love my 2007 suspension , I guess with all the changes jeep has made over the years they got a really good suspension now with the 2014
 

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The idea behind lift is to fit bigger tires. If you use the rationale above, then lowering your Jeep will also increase on road performance. The idea in a suspension upgrade is to maximize it for your intended use. Lift it as little as possible to fit the tires and improve the shocks/ springs as necessary. If you don't need the clearance, lower your Jeep or get a Subaru. I'm guessing that the stock height is perfect for your needs, but it might not be for everyone's.

Then there's the cool factor of lifted Jeeps. Some are willing to sacrifice handling just to get the look they want. Keep Jeepin!
 

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Happy with the suspension, in fact its the first Wrangler I bought because of that. I tried I think a 2003 Rubicon when they came out and was horrified, then I took a trip to Hawaii a couple of years ago and rented a newer JK Wrangler for the week, and fell in love with it!
 

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The idea behind lift is to fit bigger tires. If you use the rationale above, then lowering your Jeep will also increase on road performance. The idea in a suspension upgrade is to maximize it for your intended use. Lift it as little as possible to fit the tires and improve the shocks/ springs as necessary. If you don't need the clearance, lower your Jeep or get a Subaru. I'm guessing that the stock height is perfect for your needs, but it might not be for everyone's.

Then there's the cool factor of lifted Jeeps. Some are willing to sacrifice handling just to get the look they want. Keep Jeepin!
If you're speaking to me, KS, we are on the same page. I'm not confused at all about these aspects of a Jeep, and it's why I bought one. If I were only going to use it for road work, then yes, I would actually lower it. But I'd also replace the mud terrains with Michelin Pilot Super Sports in a 25-series sidewall, replace the solid axle with a fully independent suspension front and rear, beef up the master cylinder and fit 15" brake discs and six-piston calipers, etc. :D In fact, (and this is the point) I wouldn't get a Wrangler at all. I already have Porsches with that specification.

But by the same token, if I have no rocks to crawl in the southeast (well, not many anyway), and the extra 1.5" of clearance a set of 35s give me isn't worth the diminished handling they saddle the Jeep with, I see no reason to engage in the (oftentimes) knee-jerk reaction of fitting a set of cheap wheels, a budget lift and a set of 35s on the truck, just because "that's the first thing everybody does when they get a Wrangler."

Now, if (or when?) I start running into situations off-road that would have been cured or improved with a lifted suspension, sure, I'll go that route after much research into what is the best solution for my newfound problems. In fact, even if I don't run into such problems, I may very well beef up the stock Rubi shocks with a set of good replacements, without touching the springs. I also may widen the track with spacers. Neither of which has anything to do with the act of "lifting."

And I continue to submit that an unlifted Jeep running the same shocks/springs/spacers/wheels/tires as yours, would handle better than yours on-road.

I know I'm new on this particular forum, and hope I'm not coming off as simply argumentative for the sake of argument; that's not my intention. I just hate to see a lot of people throwing $350 at their Jeep's suspension, getting a particular "look" that says "This dude/dudette is a serious off-road playa," then never utilizing the advantages that lift kit might bring to the Jeep, while suffering the diminished road manners every day they drive it.

But in the end, it's all good, as the kids say. :beerdrinking:
 

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As I indicated, improvements in body control could definitely be made by substitution of the shocks for better damped units. Your lift kit most likely includes better shocks.

But every single thing about the process of lifting a vehicle diminishes its road manners. Check out every single road-racing vehicle in the history of road-racing. Check out the best-engineered luxury cars out there.

Lifting raises the center of gravity. It lengthens suspension travel. It lengthens the various polar moments of suspension pieces, increasing the leverage (force) which the body uses against the frame to "wallow." If better shocks are used they can hide or cover up these inherent failings of a lifted vehicle, BUT (and here's the important part): the same shocks fitted to a stock (lower) ride-height Wrangler will make an even greater improvement in on-road handling. And if compared to the lifted Jeep, you would be able to tell that the lower one (with improved shocks) handles better on-road.
I would have to agree with you on just the coils and shocks part. However, a complete lift will not handle worse than stock. A long arm kit will get your axles recenter, a drag link flip kit will tremendously help steering, and better coils/shocks will help with ride comfort. Have you ridden in a coilover Jeep, even with just short arms it rides better than stock.
 

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If you're speaking to me, KS, we are on the same page. I'm not confused at all about these aspects of a Jeep, and it's why I bought one. If I were only going to use it for road work, then yes, I would actually lower it. But I'd also replace the mud terrains with Michelin Pilot Super Sports in a 25-series sidewall, replace the solid axle with a fully independent suspension front and rear, beef up the master cylinder and fit 15" brake discs and six-piston calipers, etc. :D In fact, (and this is the point) I wouldn't get a Wrangler at all. I already have Porsches with that specification. But by the same token, if I have no rocks to crawl in the southeast (well, not many anyway), and the extra 1.5" of clearance a set of 35s give me isn't worth the diminished handling they saddle the Jeep with, I see no reason to engage in the (oftentimes) knee-jerk reaction of fitting a set of cheap wheels, a budget lift and a set of 35s on the truck, just because "that's the first thing everybody does when they get a Wrangler." Now, if (or when?) I start running into situations off-road that would have been cured or improved with a lifted suspension, sure, I'll go that route after much research into what is the best solution for my newfound problems. In fact, even if I don't run into such problems, I may very well beef up the stock Rubi shocks with a set of good replacements, without touching the springs. I also may widen the track with spacers. Neither of which has anything to do with the act of "lifting." And I continue to submit that an unlifted Jeep running the same shocks/springs/spacers/wheels/tires as yours, would handle better than yours on-road. I know I'm new on this particular forum, and hope I'm not coming off as simply argumentative for the sake of argument; that's not my intention. I just hate to see a lot of people throwing $350 at their Jeep's suspension, getting a particular "look" that says "This dude/dudette is a serious off-road playa," then never utilizing the advantages that lift kit might bring to the Jeep, while suffering the diminished road manners every day they drive it. But in the end, it's all good, as the kids say. :beerdrinking:
I think we're on the same page. My Jeep has remained stock for 18 months because it suits my needs. However, I now have a little too much weight up front requiring an upgrade. Now the fact that I can upgrade lift slightly and increase tire size slightly while maintaining my stock ride is a bonus as I can go from a 32" to 33" tire in the process, thus improving my off road capabilities slightly while making minimal/zero compromises to on road manners.
Not everyone has interest in improved performance or has the same end game as you or I. While I don't get it necessarily, I do understand it. To each their own.
 

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I would have to agree with you on just the coils and shocks part. However, a complete lift will not handle worse than stock. A long arm kit will get your axles recenter, a drag link flip kit will tremendously help steering, and better coils/shocks will help with ride comfort. Have you ridden in a coilover Jeep, even with just short arms it rides better than stock.
Actually, yes, I have. My good friend has a 2006 TJ Rubicon with such a suspension, along with Mickey Thompson 35s, new fenders to cover them, and a few other suspension goodies. It rides and drives much worse than mine, but that may not be a fair comparison because I don't know anything about how the TJ compares to the JK as far as a basic platform to start with. In other words, he could have improved his TJ with the upgrades and it still not be as good as a stock JK.

Back to my points: if you fitted some of your excellent upgraded aftermarket equipment to a stock height (or even lowered) JK, it would enjoy all of the advantages you are experiencing on your lifted Jeep, PLUS the considerable advantage of a significantly lower CG. Maybe ya'll are just gonna have to trust me on this one, or we agree to disagree, but in road-going vehicles, low CG (all else being equal) is a tremendous advantage in the performance arena. Lowering the CG (within reason -- not allowing the car to sit on the bump stops or putting in springs so stiff that the tires lose contact over the tiniest ripple in the pavement) -- lowering the CG has tangible benefits to a car's manners on road. Left-right-left transitions are where this is the easiest to feel. Again, all else being equal with the quality of the equipment under the fenders.
 

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I just added the AEV 2.5" JK DualSport XT and i'm still running the stock 32" BFG's (for now) and it handles great. Frankly, living in the burbs of Philly, with the pot holes, i might as well be off-road. That said the new suspension has handled these chewed up roads much better than the stock rubi suspension.

my off-road preferences are sand, mud, snow, and Pa roads ;)
 

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I just added the AEV 2.5" JK DualSport XT and i'm still running the stock 32" BFG's (for now) and it handles great. Frankly, living in the burbs of Philly, with the pot holes, i might as well be off-road. That said the new suspension has handled these chewed up roads much better than the stock rubi suspension. my off-road preferences are sand, mud, snow, and Pa roads ;)
Good to know... My Rubi is getting the AEV 2.5 installed today. The pot holes in my neighborhood are far worse that the fire roads I trail when hunting in PA.
 

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Good to know... My Rubi is getting the AEV 2.5 installed today. The pot holes in my neighborhood are far worse that the fire roads I trail when hunting in PA.
There were more than a few times this winter I could have used a spotter on my daily commute! Haha
 

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If you're in love with your stock suspension, put a budget boost on it with some 9000xl shocks. Your ride will improve a bit thanks to the shocks, you'll retain the stock feel and get 2-2.5 inches of lift depending on the kit. Get the right shock length and you could easily upgrade to 2.5 inch springs in the future.
 

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There were more than a few times this winter I could have used a spotter on my daily commute! Haha
Ugh, our Pa winter was awful. The Farmer's Almanac said it would be harsh and it was right on. Hope this winter is mild.
 
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