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My wife could do it herself, she used to do that sort of stuff herself until I came along.
If they are using stock parts the brakes should last just as long. If they use cheaper aftermarket parts it is not uncommon for the brakes to wear out sooner.
I would think you could find a fellow Jeeper to help you install a set of the Dynatrac brakes.
Honestly, this type of stuff from dealers gets my blood boiling. If I was even close to her I would offer to change out the brake pads, rotors, or even install a big brake kit. I am sure we can find some Jeep folks here that might be able to help.
 

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The first thing you need to do is find a good trustworthy mechanic. Ask around among your friends. If there is a local Jeep club, hook up with them, even if it's only online. On the Facebook page for our local Jeep club, withing the last week there was someone asking just that. What local mechanics we use other than the Jeep dealer. There were about 3 good answers with explanations.

Then when you get an answer, go by and talk to them. Take a notebook and pencil/pen and ask them some question. If they try to blow smoke or are disrespectful because you are female, cross them off your list and go to the next one. Have a good one give you a quote and ask if they will install brakes if you supply the parts. If they say yes, you have a winner.

Here is the reason - the over the counter price for the 2 rotors and 4 pads for the front at the dealer list for $365. for the rear, it's $377 or a total of $742. That's parts only then they charge you flat rate labor (x hours at y $/hr). They use a flat rate book that says it shout take x hours. (Most mechanics can do it faster). The rate is their labor rate for hour. If it takes 4 hours at $100 an hour that's $400 or a total of about $1142. Then they add in shop supplies and taxes. That's pretty close to your $1200.

On the other hand, you can purchase those same parts online for about $260 for the front and $268 for the rear or a total for the parts of $528, plus shipping and taxes. If you take it to your local mechanic and he gets the parts at O'Reilly's for example, it will be about $371 your cost (on line listing) plus maybe $150-$200 to install them. So now we are down to $571 plus supplies and taxes on the parts.

But it could be better. Quadratec lists the PowerStop Z16 Front Rotors and Pads for $82.65 and Rear rotors and pads for $77.98 for a total of $160.63 for the 4 rotors and pads that are equivalent to your stock brakes. Their Z23 rotors and pads which are an upgrade go for $373. But you then need to find someone to install them. A friend perhaps who does mechanic work or that shop that will install your parts.

There are several reasons the mechanic might let you get the parts. Yes, they get a discount, but even if it's 20% that would be about $75, but he has to do the research or discuss with the supplier which parts he needs, then either send someone to get them or give up some of his discount to get them delivered. Then it is billed to him so he has to process the invoice and verify that it is correct and pay it. All of that takes time, which you can get done for him. That time he can be working on a vehicle and getting paid for it.

While my '17 Chief is not at the point of needing brakes, the Powerstop Z23 is what I will be having installed by my mechanic. My '03 TJ had a full brake job done two years ago with the Powerstop Z16 rotors and pads and rebuilt calipers and all new hoses. You might also want to consider having the hoses replaced at the same time as well. They do degrade internally over time. They won't impede the application of the brakes but if the internal layer is degrading, it may keep them for releasing and wind up dragging the brakes and wearing them out more quickly than normal.
 
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By the way, the stock tires for a JK/JKU Sahara are P255/70R18 or 32" tall tires. You have the 275/70R18 tires or one size up at 33.2". Big tires would indicated 35" or larger tires. The 33s should not put much more of a load on your brakes than the 32" stock tires.
 
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You can buy everything on line, rotors, pads and all from Powerstop. Then just flag some guy down in a Jeep to install them for you. If you want to see how it's done just check U tube. You're a little too far away for me. Check a local Jeep club.
 
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It's a shame that this sort of dealership treatment happens to women. When walking into a dealership, assume they are going to use every advantage at their disposal to make as much money off of you as they can. Check out the brake pads on my wife's subaru that "only had 5% life left" according to the dealer. They also wanted to flush her brake fluid because it was slightly brown.
 

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The service writer at my local dealership used to try to "upsell" my visit with a lot of nice but unneeded service work. Don't think they do it just to women, they do it all all who are not well versed in mechanics. I think they have learned over the years finally that I won't be upsold.

Any good shop can do a decent job on brakes. It's is a very common and repeated procedure if you put a good number of miles on a vehicle. Back in the day shops used to turn the rotors, not because the rotors really needed it, but for comfort. The pads wear a little off the rotors as the pads are wearing and they develop a little ridge on the outer edge of the rotor, and over time cut small grooves in the rotor. If the rotor is in good shape (ignore the very small concentric grooves) then you can get by with just changing pads. In fact, 40 years ago that was the norm. The first time I saw a friend update his brakes (and mine at the same time) it was as simple as removing the wheel, unclipping the old pads, spreading the caliper pistons, inserting the new pads, replacing the clips, remounting the tire and done. Now it will take a while for the pads to fully seat themselves and until that time they feel a bit funny and are noisy, but after a couple up hundred miles all is good.

To avoid that seating time, shops used to take the rotors off and have them turned to slightly smooth the surface. I had a set of rotors on a truck that were turned twice - they went through three sets of pads. There is a downside to turning rotors and that is time. While the rotors are off, the vehicle is sitting in a shop bay taking up space that could have a vehicle being serviced. But as the price of rotors dropped, they started to just replace the rotors. Some of the newer rotors on more consumer vehicles (ie: cars, minivans) start out thin and can't be turned. I don't know about the Jeeps, and finding places to turn rotors these days is getting more difficult. Some auto parts store will still do it.
 

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A good shop may also advise an upgraded braking system that would last longer if you really are wearing your brake pads out in 18k miles. I replaced my rear rotors and pads in February this year at 70k miles on my 2017 JKUR. I have the front upgraded rotors and pads ready to be installed when needed, or sooner before the weather turns too cold to work under the car port. I have replaced my stock 32.1" tires with 32.6" tires. So the increased rotor diameter and dual piston calipers should more than offset my braking ability.

As others have advised above, check for some clubs in the state section here or on social media sites to find some local help.
 

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The service writer at my local dealership used to try to "upsell" my visit with a lot of nice but unneeded service work. Don't think they do it just to women, they do it all all who are not well versed in mechanics. I think they have learned over the years finally that I won't be upsold.

Any good shop can do a decent job on brakes. It's is a very common and repeated procedure if you put a good number of miles on a vehicle. Back in the day shops used to turn the rotors, not because the rotors really needed it, but for comfort. The pads wear a little off the rotors as the pads are wearing and they develop a little ridge on the outer edge of the rotor, and over time cut small grooves in the rotor. If the rotor is in good shape (ignore the very small concentric grooves) then you can get by with just changing pads. In fact, 40 years ago that was the norm. The first time I saw a friend update his brakes (and mine at the same time) it was as simple as removing the wheel, unclipping the old pads, spreading the caliper pistons, inserting the new pads, replacing the clips, remounting the tire and done. Now it will take a while for the pads to fully seat themselves and until that time they feel a bit funny and are noisy, but after a couple up hundred miles all is good.

To avoid that seating time, shops used to take the rotors off and have them turned to slightly smooth the surface. I had a set of rotors on a truck that were turned twice - they went through three sets of pads. There is a downside to turning rotors and that is time. While the rotors are off, the vehicle is sitting in a shop bay taking up space that could have a vehicle being serviced. But as the price of rotors dropped, they started to just replace the rotors. Some of the newer rotors on more consumer vehicles (ie: cars, minivans) start out thin and can't be turned. I don't know about the Jeeps, and finding places to turn rotors these days is getting more difficult. Some auto parts store will still do it.
I have an old man at work, his dad made a living back in the 60s or 70s by re-shoeing disc brake pads. Back when disc brakes came about, the pads were expensive. They had a machine that would scrape off the old pad material, and then they had a kit of generic sized pad materials that they would rivet to the pad backer.

Funny how stuff like that is unheard of now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Well being of whatever gender does not mean one is unable to do maintenance x on a vehicle. Now, one might not want to do it, but boy/girl/man/woman/whatever, don't make one more or less capable of fixing cars 😉

You can do it, but it's totally ok if you don't want to.

As for the wearing: living on montaneous area and daily driving your Jeep, I'd say getting ~20k out of brakes is totally normal.
I wasn't try to gender label but unfortunately I am not into fixing vehicles. Sorry if I hurt anyone's feelings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Unfortunately you’re being taken for a ride at $1200 for brake pads. It’s quite a simple process to change pads yourself (especially with the help of very good YouTube videos out there!). I’d suggest asking one of your friends that might help you out the first time and tackle it yourself. After the first time doing it yourself you’ll be like, “dang…that was too easy and those darn scoundrels taking advantage of me…how dare them!”
not for brake pad but the rotors and pads for front and rear
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Welcome to the forum. Brake pads at 20k means you are probably riding the brakes when you should be using your gears. Still, that is a very high bill for new brake pads. Completely new brakes? $1,100? That I would have to see as the pads are what wear out unless you have warped the rotors as well.

I installed the Dynatrac big brake kit on my 2014 and it was just terrific.

If your Sahara is an auto transmission you might want to learn how to use the gears in braking. It is not hard. Before I launch into that discussion are you braking with gears on those mountain roads?
Yes it is automatic. I never use the gears, I was told that if i down shift i could damage the engine (at least that is what bertera told me.
 

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not for brake pad but the rotors and pads for front and rear
As explained, that is a fairly steep price for a brake job, replacing rotors and pads. But honestly, if you take it to a dealer that is typical. They are not typically an economical place to get work done. Of more concern is if they are correct that your pads are worn out again or if they are just lying to you. As mentioned, it is not uncommon for a dealership to lie to you about needing work done. They are notorious for doing that. The brake pads should have a wear indicator tab on them, that tab will start making a squealing noise when the pads are getting near worn out. If it is there, or near there, your pads are near worn out. If it isn't near there, your pads are not near worn out.
It is possible that your pads are worn out already. But if they are, something is wrong. Whether it is a mechanical issue like the brakes dragging or someone riding the brakes without realizing it. JK brakes do not wear out that fast, unless something is wrong. Having slightly larger tires is not going to do that.
If you have no desire to work on your own vehicle, that is fine. But if you are going to pay someone to do that for you it would be a good idea to find a reputable, honest, mechanic. It kinda sounds like the one you have now may not be that. Or something is wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Honestly, this type of stuff from dealers gets my blood boiling. If I was even close to her I would offer to change out the brake pads, rotors, or even install a big brake kit. I am sure we can find some Jeep folks here that might be able to help.
Thank you. I wish I had time to learn to do it myself, but work in the hospital and all kinds of crazy shifts. I do not have anything to lift my jeep especially since it has a 2" lift. When I asked Bertera if there was a local shop around to do modifications, they couldn't even tell me.... they had no idea and they sold me the Jeep. I don't mind paying for quality and work but I work long shifts and drive very little distance to work and I can't imagine blowing through brake pads and rotors every 18K. If this is usual than I may have to sell. I love my jeep especially. I feel safe being elevated. I wish I knew who I could trust.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
As explained, that is a fairly steep price for a brake job, replacing rotors and pads. But honestly, if you take it to a dealer that is typical. They are not typically an economical place to get work done. Of more concern is if they are correct that your pads are worn out again or if they are just lying to you. As mentioned, it is not uncommon for a dealership to lie to you about needing work done. They are notorious for doing that. The brake pads should have a wear indicator tab on them, that tab will start making a squealing noise when the pads are getting near worn out. If it is there, or near there, your pads are near worn out. If it isn't near there, your pads are not near worn out.
It is possible that your pads are worn out already. But if they are, something is wrong. Whether it is a mechanical issue like the brakes dragging or someone riding the brakes without realizing it. JK brakes do not wear out that fast, unless something is wrong. Having slightly larger tires is not going to do that.
If you have no desire to work on your own vehicle, that is fine. But if you are going to pay someone to do that for you it would be a good idea to find a reputable, honest, mechanic. It kinda sounds like the one you have now may not be that. Or something is wrong.
Bertera mentioned 3mm on my front pads. Can't remember the back.... No noise yet.... just a squeaky brake pedal when releasing pedal which I had for quite a few years..... I had asked them to fix it (maybe a little grease) but they always forget. I just assumed being in a bouncy rugged jeep.... these things are normal....
Yes I need to stop going to Bertera.... Hopefully I can find someone trustworthy near me... I'm presently looking. Thanks
 

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I wasn't try to gender label but unfortunately I am not into fixing vehicles. Sorry if I hurt anyone's feelings.
I for one am getting too old for having feelings on the inter of webz 😃

Just as a father of a bunch of girls, I'm always trying to fade the lines between what who is capable of what 👨‍🔧👩🏼‍🔧
 

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It's VERY common that mechanics will tell you your brake pads need replacing when looking at them.

And sometimes it's actually true.

Changing out brake pads isn't much harder than changing an air filter or filling the tank with gas. If you're not able to inspect the brakes yourself ask the mechanic to let you look at them yourself while it's on the lift or they're easy enough to remove, have him bring them out to you and show them to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
By the way, the stock tires for a JK/JKU Sahara are P255/70R18 or 32" tall tires. You have the 275/70R18 tires or one size up at 33.2". Big tires would indicated 35" or larger tires. The 33s should not put much more of a load on your brakes than the 32" stock tires.
even with a 2" lift?
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 ·
even with a 2" lift?
It's VERY common that mechanics will tell you your brake pads need replacing when looking at them.

And sometimes it's actually true.

even with a 2" lift?
Than
even with a 2" lift?
even with a 2" lift?
Thanks I wasn't sure but 33.2 sounds about right..... I special ordered them when I bought the jeep 5 years ago.
even with a 2" lift?

Changing out brake pads isn't much harder than changing an air filter or filling the tank with gas. If you're not able to inspect the brakes yourself ask the mechanic to let you look at them yourself while it's on the lift or they're easy enough to remove, have him bring them out to you and show them to you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
The first time I had rubbing (metal on metal) but this time I was just in for a routine oil changes. Plus can they tell if your pads are worn without removing the tires? I forgot my wheel locks so they couldn't even rotate my tires.
 

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They can se, if they are good, and depending on your wheels. Usually they will use a small mirror to check it out. I did a quick Google Search for Jeep Shops in West Springfield. There was one that had all five star ratings. I have never used them myself, and frankly live in Arizona and never been closer than Boston to you. It is called "Vehicle Repair Center of Western Mass". Their phone number is 413-306-3193 and they are at 414 Park St. They will probably be more than quaified to do your brakes. If you have any questions, people here will probably be more than able to help you out. Incidentally, I am able to do front and rear brakes on a jeep in less than an hour.
 
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