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even with a 2" lift?
The lift has nothing to do with it. It just means the springs are a little taller. If may affect handling if not done right as you are changing the geometry of the stock suspension. Depending on the brand it may right a bit rougher and if the track bar was not adjusted you could have off set axles and or bump steer. If you haven't noticed poor handling then the lift was probably done correctly.

What affects brake pads is the number and pressure of the application. For example if you see the red light several blocks ahead and you come off the gas and coast down until you have to apply the brakes, then you get better wear than if you come up and have to apply heavy braking to stop in time. Jack Rabbit starts and stops are rough on gas mileage and brakes.

For example I now have over 30K on my '17 Chief with the same brakes yours came with. My pads are still in good shape. However, I live in the table flat S. Georgia and most of my driving is in the country and on rural highways. I may go miles before I have to stop.

Mountainous curvy roads have a tendency to eat brakes.

Who does your tire rotations? I would not have the dealer do it. I have an independent tire shop do mine (have for 3 decades) and simply ask them to check the brake pads while they have the wheels off.

Plus when your pads get too thin you will know it quickly. There have little metal tell tales then when rubbing against a rotor squeal like a banshee. But, at that point they need to be replaced ASAP, so do your planning ahead of time. Find a mechanic that has a good reputation and ask him if he will install your parts.
 
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We got somewhere around 50,000 miles out of our stock pads, and they still had plenty of life in the front pads when we changed them. We upgraded the brakes to larger rotors because we run much larger tires. Bigger tires can increase the load and wear on the brakes, but a small difference like going from 32” tires to 33” tires just isn’t going to make a noticeable difference. You should easily get way more than 20,000 miles out of your brakes. If you aren’t, something is wrong. Driving habits and city driving vs highway driving do make a difference, but it should not be that extreme.
The suggestion to have a tire shop that rotates your tires check the brakes when they rotate them is a great suggestion, especially if the tire shop isn’t one that also does brakes. That way they have no reason to lie. You should get the tires rotated at least every oil change.
The stock jack can lift a tire off the ground. The lift doesn’t change that, as the jacking points are the axles and they are the same height off the ground regardless of lift height. The tires do raise the axles slightly, but only half the increase in tire diameter. So with tires an inch larger in diameter the axles are only a half inch higher off the ground. Still easily within range of the stock jack. Good thing too, or you would be screwed by a flat tire.
 

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As for the tell tail metal wear indicator that rubs, I heard what I thought was the wear indicator squealing and was researching what rotors and pads to order (replacement brake kit and Big Brake Kits). I thought I had some time. I was washing my wheels one day and noticed a lot of dust (that didn't wipe off) on my right rear wheel. I had worn my RR brake pads to the metal and had damaged (excessive scratching on the rotor). I drove to the local Autozone and purchased what they had on the shelf for rotors and brake pads and installed them that day. The 1.5 to 2 hour brake job took me 4 hours due to the RR rotor not wanting to come loose from the hub. Sure made the left side seem easy 😁. I kept getting up and walking to stretch my back.
 

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not for brake pad but the rotors and pads for front and rear
Even still. That’s way to much for rotors and pads. Rotors are super easy to change. And they want to change the rotors with only 20,000 miles on them? I’d really like to take my fractional caliper to them to see how much life they still have left. It just seems those crooked people are taking you for a ride. 😤
 

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I bought a Jeep Wrangler sahara unlimited in 2016. Presently I have 43k on it. I have a 2" lift and 18x9 265/70R 18 BFG KO2 tires. Although I get my vehicle serviced regularly, I required new brakes in 2019 at only 24k which I was told is fairly common. I do live an elevated area and travel up/down the mountain (paved roads) for 17 miles every other day. I just brought my vehicle in for an oil change and a squeaky brake pedal (I've had for at least 3 years) and was told I need front and rear brakes again. Is this common. I only put on 18,945 miles since the last brake job. My question is ..... do I need better brake pads? I can't keep paying 1200$ every 20k for new breaks. I am not sure why they are not picking up the wear of the brake pads during my oil changes. But I read somewhere that a lift and bigger tires require tougher brake pads. Any info would be apreciated.
They do, more rotating mass to stop.
Try going to a ceramic/asbestos blend next time on your pads. They'll stop better and last longer and have less dust.
If your tires and wheels are just too big for your breaks, you need to go to a "big brake" kit which will include rotors, pads and calipers.
Average cost should be around $200 per axle for a stock break job, even if they need to turn the rotors. fwiw
 

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Discussion Starter · #46 ·
They can se, if they are good, and depending on your wheels. Usually they will use a small mirror to check it out. I did a quick Google Search for Jeep Shops in West Springfield. There was one that had all five star ratings. I have never used them myself, and frankly live in Arizona and never been closer than Boston to you. It is called "Vehicle Repair Center of Western Mass". Their phone number is 413-306-3193 and they are at 414 Park St. They will probably be more than quaified to do your brakes. If you have any questions, people here will probably be more than able to help you out. Incidentally, I am able to do front and rear brakes on a jeep in less than an hour.
Thank u
The lift has nothing to do with it. It just means the springs are a little taller. If may affect handling if not done right as you are changing the geometry of the stock suspension. Depending on the brand it may right a bit rougher and if the track bar was not adjusted you could have off set axles and or bump steer. If you haven't noticed poor handling then the lift was probably done correctly.

What affects brake pads is the number and pressure of the application. For example if you see the red light several blocks ahead and you come off the gas and coast down until you have to apply the brakes, then you get better wear than if you come up and have to apply heavy braking to stop in time. Jack Rabbit starts and stops are rough on gas mileage and brakes.

For example I now have over 30K on my '17 Chief with the same brakes yours came with. My pads are still in good shape. However, I live in the table flat S. Georgia and most of my driving is in the country and on rural highways. I may go miles before I have to stop.

Mountainous curvy roads have a tendency to eat brakes.

Who does your tire rotations? I would not have the dealer do it. I have an independent tire shop do mine (have for 3 decades) and simply ask them to check the brake pads while they have the wheels off.

Plus when your pads get too thin you will know it quickly. There have little metal tell tales then when rubbing against a rotor squeal like a banshee. But, at that point they need to be replaced ASAP, so do your planning ahead of time. Find a mechanic that has a good reputation and ask him if he will install your parts.
Thank you... bertera has done any and all work on my vehicle.... I went there because if I had any problem....I was under warranty....unfortunately my fist brake job obviously was not and now I have no warranty. I will never use them again ...I find them rude and incompetent
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
It's a shame that this sort of dealership treatment happens to women. When walking into a dealership, assume they are going to use every advantage at their disposal to make as much money off of you as they can. Check out the brake pads on my wife's subaru that "only had 5% life left" according to the dealer. They also wanted to flush her brake fluid because it was slightly brown.
yes they recommended full set of brakes and brake line flush too....
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
The lift has nothing to do with it. It just means the springs are a little taller. If may affect handling if not done right as you are changing the geometry of the stock suspension. Depending on the brand it may right a bit rougher and if the track bar was not adjusted you could have off set axles and or bump steer. If you haven't noticed poor handling then the lift was probably done correctly.

What affects brake pads is the number and pressure of the application. For example if you see the red light several blocks ahead and you come off the gas and coast down until you have to apply the brakes, then you get better wear than if you come up and have to apply heavy braking to stop in time. Jack Rabbit starts and stops are rough on gas mileage and brakes.

For example I now have over 30K on my '17 Chief with the same brakes yours came with. My pads are still in good shape. However, I live in the table flat S. Georgia and most of my driving is in the country and on rural highways. I may go miles before I have to stop.

Mountainous curvy roads have a tendency to eat brakes.

Who does your tire rotations? I would not have the dealer do it. I have an independent tire shop do mine (have for 3 decades) and simply ask them to check the brake pads while they have the wheels off.

Plus when your pads get too thin you will know it quickly. There have little metal tell tales then when rubbing against a rotor squeal like a banshee. But, at that point they need to be replaced ASAP, so do your planning ahead of time. Find a mechanic that has a good reputation and ask him if he will install your parts.
My last brake issue I heard that tell tale sign and they said my rotors were effected. This time I hear nothing yet and they say I need new rotors...I'm not buying that...
 

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Discussion Starter · #49 ·
The lift has nothing to do with it. It just means the springs are a little taller. If may affect handling if not done right as you are changing the geometry of the stock suspension. Depending on the brand it may right a bit rougher and if the track bar was not adjusted you could have off set axles and or bump steer. If you haven't noticed poor handling then the lift was probably done correctly.

What affects brake pads is the number and pressure of the application. For example if you see the red light several blocks ahead and you come off the gas and coast down until you have to apply the brakes, then you get better wear than if you come up and have to apply heavy braking to stop in time. Jack Rabbit starts and stops are rough on gas mileage and brakes.

For example I now have over 30K on my '17 Chief with the same brakes yours came with. My pads are still in good shape. However, I live in the table flat S. Georgia and most of my driving is in the country and on rural highways. I may go miles before I have to stop.

Mountainous curvy roads have a tendency to eat brakes.

Who does your tire rotations? I would not have the dealer do it. I have an independent tire shop do mine (have for 3 decades) and simply ask them to check the brake pads while they have the wheels off.

Plus when your pads get too thin you will know it quickly. There have little metal tell tales then when rubbing against a rotor squeal like a banshee. But, at that point they need to be replaced ASAP, so do your planning ahead of time. Find a mechanic that has a good reputation and ask him if he will install your parts.
Bertera does it when I get my oil change.
 

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So, I think you need to try the Jeep shop that AzScooter found.

Ask the shop to change your brake pads for now and also ask them about a big brake kit.

Also, downshifting will NOT mess up your tranny unless you do severe downshifts and a lot of them.

Try this in a parking lot or some place you have room:
  • slap the auto stick left (you are now in manual mode)
  • make sure you are not slapping the stick forward or back until you are in manual mode
  • slap it forward for down a gear and back for up a gear (I hope I got the order right it has been a while since I was in a JK)
  • slap it right and hold about 1 second or 2 to go back to auto
  • If you forget and come to a stop in a higher gear than 1st it will automatically downshift for you but it will keep you in manual mode.

When I am driving around our mountain roads I am downshifting all the time to control the Jeep. I seldom hit the brakes. This is especially useful on long steep downgrades where you can let the tranny slow the Jeep.
 

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I would suggest you try Westside Tire and Auto Service. They seem to have a good rating on the net, and also meet one of my requirements - that they also serve the commercial truck business as well. Commercial truck operators will not become a repeat customer to a company that doesn't give them reliable service. The tire dealer I use down here seems to be similar - independent (not a franchisee of a chain), commercial business model and the photo of their manager gave me the last piece. What's important in the photo is not the manager or the desk he's behind, but the window behind him. The window into the shop where you can watch what is going on.


The forewoman at my tire store has forgotten more about tires than I will ever know. I have been a customer, that when it comes time, I don't need to go down there (it's a 30 minute drive), I just call. Most of my prep dealing is by phone. The owner will fire any tech that puts an air wrench on a lug nut to tighten it. They can use them to remove the lug nuts, but the go back on with a torque wrench. If I buy my tires, they rotate them for free. And I buy all my tires from them. They can get any brand.
 
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That is the Mopar list price for pads and rotors plus installation labor at the dealers rate. The over the counter price for the four rotors and 2 sets of pad (F&R) is $742. That's parts only. Then you add installation labor, shop supplies and taxes and you can easily get to $1200.

Seven years ago I was quoted over $700 by my dealer to do just the front on my '08 Town & Country. I had my tire shop do all four for a bit over $500. I had all four brakes on my TJ replaced two years ago - including hoses and calipers for $705 at an independent shop. I provided the parts and my mechanic did the work. Without replacing the calipers (definitely needed at 130K miles) it would have been less than $500.

Aftermarket parts are about half what factory parts run. In some cases, most especially in brakes, they are many times more effective as well as less expensive. Dealer parts have you captured. You go in and ask to have the brakes replaced. You may or may not ask how much. Even if you do, many times you wouldn't have another quote to compare to.

I had my oil changed the other day at my dealer and it was a bit over $50, it used to be under $30. But I will continue to let them change the oil because of the quirky oil cooler housing which will crack if you tighten the filter housing cap too much. The TJ will now have the oil changed at my tire dealer for $28.
 

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I’m going to give a big x2 to whoever recommended the powerstop. I had to replace my rear stocks at 10k miles (driving style and 35 inch tires). However I put the z36 brake pads on the existing rotors (please don’t hate) and now have 18k miles on these pads and they look almost new. I don’t remember if the picture below was the fronts or backs, but I did replace all 4 and they were cheap (again, old man memory, just check Amazon once you get the right part number)

I found it was so easy to change my brake pads, I actually got mad that I ever had someone else do it I in fact then changed the pads and rotors on my daughters Audi A4, but wouldn’t recommend, German engineering made it a bit harder
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I was quoted $680 from the dealer for just rear brakepads and rotors.. I went with the Dynatrac big break kit for all 4 corners and got it for $995
 

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I run 37 12.50 and use wilwood brakes and they last longer than that for less money. You need to turn rotors as well as replace pads with some of their hd pads.
 

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The only thing that can be a bit annoying when changing brake pads is re-compressing the cylinder if it pushes out. I always use a very big pipe wrench so as not to scar the piston and slowly push it back in.
 

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I’m going to give a big x2 to whoever recommended the powerstop. I had to replace my rear stocks at 10k miles (driving style and 35 inch tires). However I put the z36 brake pads on the existing rotors (please don’t hate) and now have 18k miles on these pads and they look almost new. I don’t remember if the picture below was the fronts or backs, but I did replace all 4 and they were cheap (again, old man memory, just check Amazon once you get the right part number)
I run 37 12.50 and use wilwood brakes and they last longer than that for less money. You need to turn rotors as well as replace pads with some of their hd pads.
The industry has convinced everyone that the rotors need to be replaced or turned every time the pads are replaced. This is not true. In fact in the early days of disc brakes, the rotors were not turned each time. Most who replaced the pads themselves did not have the rotors turned.

We all know rotors will develop surface rust if allowed to sit for a period, but then the first few applications of the brakes removes the rust as the pads are pressed into the surface. However at both the inner and outer reaches of the rotors where the pads do not rub, a small lip develops, composed of surface rust and dirt and grime from the road. If you simply change the pads, it is unlikely that the new pads wipe the exact same path as the previous pads, so there can be a bit of noise and vibration associated with the application of the brakes for the first hundred miles or so until the pads either remove that small ridge or develop a grove in the pad to accommodate it.

Everyone reads the instructions included with the new pads about the brake in right. Several moderate to aggressive accelerations to 40 MPH and braking to 10 MPH and repeat several times. If you are installing new rotors or just turned rotors that's not necessary, but it is there for those who have replaced pads to get the pads and rotors worn together. Forty years ago rotors were very expensive and turning them not common. Later shops started always having the rotors turned to avoid complaints about how the brakes felt from customers. But, when you take off the rotors and send them out to be turned, the vehicle sits there taking up a lift. When rotors got cheaper they quit turning and started replacing rotors to get the job out faster. In some cases the manufacturer went to thin rotors to start with that could not be turned so one more push to replace the rotors - after all the customer is paying for it - right?

If you rotate your own tires - the rotor is sitting right in front of you. A good time to check the surface. If it is smooth with no grooves or gouges caused by foreign material between the pads and rotors and if you need pads, why replace the rotor? If I had to change the pads after 10K miles, I doubt I would change the rotors. If the rotors have been on for 40-50K miles and are encrusted on the end and have some worn groves in them, I would probably replace them along with the pads.

Very few turn rotors anymore. For one thing if you have them turned, you have to find a place to turn them. Then you have to have a place to leave the vehicle on either jack stands or lift while the rotors are out being turned. It is unlikely you will find a shop that will do a brake job and have the rotors turned.
 
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