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For the true red neck mechanic....

I have read about axles warping when welding a truss on a dana 35,because when the weld cools after turning cold,it contracts and bends the axle slightly...

My idea one night in jeep heaven.....

(drum roll)

Lets say you welded the truss on top......

Just put welds on the bottom of the axle to mirror the same length,width etc...

of welds on top.....so the top hot welds contracting,would match the hot welds on the bottom cooling and cancel one another out....

So yes,you would just be welding the bottom of the axle,literally just putting beads on nothing,to cancel out the contraction of the top welds....So no axle warpage....

Yes this is in true redneck style....

A country boy can survive.What do you think Jeepsters?
 

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Lmaooooo i get the logic behind it, but i doubt you'd be able to ACCURATELY do that lol. In simple words what hes saying guys is to fight the upward "smiling" warpage from welding a truss by laying random beads on the bottom "frowning"
 

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Or just preload it with a chain and boomer.
Ive always been interested in this. Im having my truss put on soon and was considering this. Cant you also over preload as well? Im pretty sure the shop i was looking at welds them on the jeep they just strip them and pre heat them a bit. Im so nervous about having it done. The whole warping and welding to cast has be sweating lol
 

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Welding steel to cast steel isn't a trick at all. They cool at essentially the same rate. The cast is bound to have more impurities in it though, which can be seen in the weld pool while welding.

Welding steel to cast iron is different. Yes, there is trash in there...but also the 2 metals cool at a substantially different rate, which is what causes the weld to crack. This is why you want it to cool slowly...you're essentially slowing the cooling rate of the steel to match the inherently slower cooling rate of the iron, which prevents seperation.
 

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Welding steel to cast steel isn't a trick at all. They cool at essentially the same rate. The cast is bound to have more impurities in it though, which can be seen in the weld pool while welding.

Welding steel to cast iron is different. Yes, there is trash in there...but also the 2 metals cool at a substantially different rate, which is what causes the weld to crack. This is why you want it to cool slowly...you're essentially slowing the cooling rate of the steel to match the inherently slower cooling rate of the iron, which prevents seperation.
By the way when are you coming up to help with my welding project?
 

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By the way when are you coming up to help with my welding project?
Man...I'd love to this summer. The Rubicon trip is off...still have to plan a trip for that time frame, so may go up to Montana a little before August...be up around Missoula.

Been a long time since I've been up that way, but Missoula isn't too far from W. Washington...and a lot closer than from here!
 

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Don't do that... If you're paranoid about ruining a housing, build a jig. Then grind your truss until it fits as tight as possible to the housing. Flush all over. Tack it in starting at the center and moving out every 4-6". Then do 1" stitch welds off of your tacks, moving from side to side. When you can touch your last stitch with your bare hand then do another. Welding is 80% prep and process, even if rednecks don't like that.
 
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