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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm going to do some beach driving this summer for the first time. I have a 2006 TJ 6spd and my wife has a 2004 TJ automatic. Which would be easier in the sand?
 

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If the sand is soft, like where I'm from, Pensacola, FL, the auto for sure. You'll have to shift very quick in a manual to avoid bogging down between gears and then spinning the tires. In my day (70s), it was hard to shift a CJ or older Jeep quickly, I'm sure an '06 shifts much better.

You need to air down your tires, go light on the accelerator, it's real easy to bury a rig to the frame and get stuck. Also follow the tracks of others whenever you can rather than forge your own, light on the steering wheel, let the front tires follow the ruts and essentially steer themselves. If you push through the track, you're likely going too fast.
 

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Either will be fine, and the only time you have to quickly shift is on a steep dune climb.

If you have never driven on sand, the #1 thing is to air down. Depending on your tire size, 10-15psi. 33's-10 psi, 31's-12psi, and any thing smaller 15psi.
 

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Low air pressure is your friend in sand. I have 33x13.5 Toyo MTs on 10 inch rims that I run at 2 psi and can run in 2 wheel dr on all but the steepest sand dunes. Been doing this for 40 years and have yet to lose a bead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If the sand is soft, like where I'm from, Pensacola, FL, the auto for sure. You'll have to shift very quick in a manual to avoid bogging down between gears and then spinning the tires. In my day (70s), it was hard to shift a CJ or older Jeep quickly, I'm sure an '06 shifts much better.

You need to air down your tires, go light on the accelerator, it's real easy to bury a rig to the frame and get stuck. Also follow the tracks of others whenever you can rather than forge your own, light on the steering wheel, let the front tires follow the ruts and essentially steer themselves. If you push through the track, you're likely going too fast.
I live on the Jersey shore and the sand at the beach is real soft. so I think I'll go out with my wife's automatic. Kinda stinks, I really enjoy driving the manual.
 

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I live on the Jersey shore and the sand at the beach is real soft. so I think I'll go out with my wife's automatic. Kinda stinks, I really enjoy driving the manual.
There ya go. My other home is Cape Cod, same sand as Jersey! Seems like I spent half my life driving miles down the beach, surf-fishing both in FL and on the Cape.

Out here in Washington State, the beach is hard-packed, like Daytona Beach, regular cars drive on it.
 

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I drive on the beach all the time in Delaware and I find those with a auto trans have it easier then us with a stick. With that said I only have a stick an drive on the beach and have never gotten stuck. As others have said airdown it will make a world of a difference. I have been on the beach with 30 lbs off air and it is very fiffacult to keep from bogging down when you change gears. Just airing down to 15 lbs it is so much easier to keep momentum between shifts. The jersey sand is the same as we have in Delaware so if it's been hot and dry for a while the sand will be soft and deep.
 

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dex that's not what the sand is like here (md shore).

you would actually need power to get down that hill if it were here. on the flat dry parts (only fools and kids who don't pay for their trucks drive on the wet sand on a saltwater beach) you have to dig a at least a foot down to get to anything remotely solid (ie wet).

let off the gas and you're stopped. period. hence the comments about having to shift quickly. you also have to be very careful about putting the power on. too quickly and you just dig four holes till you hit the axles.
 

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dex that's not what the sand is like here (md shore).

you would actually need power to get down that hill if it were here. on the flat dry parts (only fools and kids who don't pay for their trucks drive on the wet sand on a saltwater beach) you have to dig a at least a foot down to get to anything remotely solid (ie wet).

let off the gas and you're stopped. period. hence the comments about having to shift quickly. you also have to be very careful about putting the power on. too quickly and you just dig four holes till you hit the axles.
I am very familiar with the light fluffy dry sand too....that is where running the tires on low PSI makes night and day difference.
 

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Has anyone been to the Oregon Sand Dunes in Flourence? When Iwas there we didn't have the OllllO yet so we took a Sand Rail Tour, what a blast that was.
 

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There ya go. My other home is Cape Cod, same sand as Jersey! Seems like I spent half my life driving miles down the beach, surf-fishing both in FL and on the Cape.

Out here in Washington State, the beach is hard-packed, like Daytona Beach, regular cars drive on it.
Live on the cape too, love driving out on the beach! Have never really had a problem shifting with my 5 speed manual, the only problem comes if you take your good old time shifting.
 

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Pends on the beach. North part of St Aug my Jeep never sees 4wd, the south end does, but that's only if I have to stop or if I don't 'float' it just right. If I were on dunes I'd probably want an auto. The delay while shifting in deep sand might be just enough to sink her. Then again, if you aired down that shouldn't be a big concern. Personally I prefer to stay in 2wd just to see how far I can go.
 
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