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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Over the past week it's been getting pretty hot here (around 80 degrees) and I've noticed the engine was running just a hair hotter than usual. Now I figured it was no big deal because of the weather, but twice on the really hot days when I would stop and turn the engine off I could hear the anti-freeze bubbling pretty loudly back into the overflow reservoir and from what I've read that's one of the symptoms of a blown head gasket. I don't have any of the other symptoms of a blown head gasket but I really don't want to run it like this and do more damage.

Just looking for some insight here, I'll likely end up taking it to the stealership and have them take a look at it but I figured I'd ask the experts first :drinks:
 

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When doing research on the same thing the biggest piece of helpful info I got was to check my oil.... If it cloudy/milky then coolant has gotten into it and that was a big sign of a blown head gasket.

That is where I would start, it's a quick look.
 

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A blown head gasket will pump compression into the cooling system when the engine is running, not after you shut the engine off. When the engine is running cylinder compression will escape the combustion chamber between the engine block and cylinder head and end up in the cooling system through the "blown" head gasket. I think you have another less expensive over heating issue at this time, please have it diagnosed and repaired or you will end up with a blown head gasket. Typically, a blown head gasket is the result of overheating the engine.
 

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My rig was running around half way between the 210 notch and the next one recently. Turned out to be the thermostat. Swapped in a new Stant for around $20, and she is back pegged just below 210 as it should be. I would recommend the more expensive one (not sure of the part number, but like i said still only $20). It has a small hole in it from the factory that allows the air to "burp" out, reducing possible temperature spikes caused by air in the system from the swap. Stay away from the failsafe t-stats!
 

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T-stat & radiator cap are a cheap start. If it's still geting hot...run a leak-down test to see if it's pushing compression into the coolant system. My head is at the machine shop right now for this same problem...replacing head gasket.
 
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