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I was trying to remove a front roof panel and I broke the screw and there is no way I can get it out. Is there anyway I can replace the nut or do I have to by a replacement roof
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^^ get a screw extractor of the appropriate size, drill a pilot hole in the broken screw and twist it out.

If that is for one of the knobs that screw through the sound bar and secures the rear of the Freedom panel, you can souce a replacement knob once the broken part has been removed.

 

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Yes, pick up a screw extractor. I also use a left hand drill bit. A lot of times, the bit will hook and help back the broken bolt out.

Hard Top Hold Down Knob
 
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Left hand bit as others have said. One of the first tools I bought off the snap-on truck in 1996. Saved me many times. But plan on it not coming out and get the appropriate tap. You can drill out the center and retap the threads if you're lucky. The Toyota dealership had a tool for installing/crimping a nut insert in the doors for the mirrors after they came off the boat. One of these tools might work to crimp a new nutsert in place as well?
 

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Left hand bit as others have said. One of the first tools I bought off the snap-on truck in 1996. Saved me many times. But plan on it not coming out and get the appropriate tap. You can drill out the center and retap the threads if you're lucky. The Toyota dealership had a tool for installing/crimping a nut insert in the doors for the mirrors after they came off the boat. One of these tools might work to crimp a new nutsert in place as well?
Even a cheap set like the link shows works well. BTW my first left twist drills came off the Snap-On truck in 1975 and I still have them.😎 Neiko 01925A Screw Extractor and Left Hand Drill Bit Set, 10 Piece | Alloy Extractors | Cobalt HSS Drill Bits | - Ship Auger Bits - Amazon.com
 

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On the plus side, the Freedom Top knob is a relatively low-torque fastener, and I suspect the bolt portion is relatively mild steel. I think OP will be able to use a low-buck extractor and will successfully solve the problem.

If he was trying to deal with a snapped cylinder head stud, it would take a bit more care and better equipment to successfully back the offending item out.
 

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I am trying to figure out how that broke? like was said these are low torque finger tight deals. someone must have really reefed on it
 

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I am trying to figure out how that broke? like was said these are low torque finger tight deals. someone must have really reefed on it
Some folks just don't know their own strength and others just have no mechanical knowledge. Combine the two and this is what you get. :eek:
 

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I am trying to figure out how that broke? like was said these are low torque finger tight deals. someone must have really reefed on it
Some folks just don't know their own strength and others just have no mechanical knowledge. Combine the two and this is what you get. :eek:
Cross-threaded? Who knows.
 

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I only own a handful of snap-on tools, and their left handed drill/ez-out kit has paid for itself many times over. You don't want to go cheap and have an ez-out break off in the bolt. Those are a nightmare to drill out.

Be aware Snap-On quality is now a mere shadow of what it once was. There's no comparison between my 40-50 year old stuff from them and the stuff they now sell with their name on it. In some cases the off-brand stuff is the very same. Tools are something you no longer get what you pay for. No matter what you get these days you're just taking a shot in the dark. This is coming from someone who has made his fortune with tools for well over half a century.
 

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Be aware Snap-On quality is now a mere shadow of what it once was. There's no comparison between my 40-50 year old stuff from them and the stuff they now sell with their name on it. In some cases the off-brand stuff is the very same. Tools are something you no longer get what you pay for. No matter what you get these days you're just taking a shot in the dark. This is coming from someone who has made his fortune with tools for well over half a century.
That's sad.
I still have/use all of the Snap-on stuff I bought back in the 70's and 80's(as well as Mac, and Matco).
Even the multi-meters and test lights still work 100%.
My Snap-on "palm ratchet" has more use on it than any other tool !!!
 

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Same with Craftsman. Name was bought from Sears by a Chinese company and that's how Lowe's got their hands on the brand name.
 

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Craftsman stuff was always manufactured by numerous different manufacturers. One of which was New Britain Machine who made tools for dozens of different brand names. Nowadays most all brands are manufactured offshore and of questionable quality. I've been having fairly good luck with Neiko, Tekton and OEMTools to name a few. It just doesn't make sense to me to pay the big name prices and end up with no better quality. This is why I offered the OP a link to a Neiko product that I own and have used successfully so far but I assure you the quality is not what I expected many years ago.
 

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Craftsman stuff was always manufactured by numerous different manufacturers. One of which was New Britain Machine who made tools for dozens of different brand names. Nowadays most all brands are manufactured offshore and of questionable quality. I've been having fairly good luck with Neiko, Tekton and OEMTools to name a few. It just doesn't make sense to me to pay the big name prices and end up with no better quality. This is why I offered the OP a link to a Neiko product that I own and have used successfully so far but I assure you the quality is not what I expected many years ago.
I think that is a "universal truth" with almost anything someone might buy these days.

I have decades worth of various tools, and pretty much all tool acquisitions in the last 10-15 years are not made to the same standard. I used to like and have good luck with Craftsman, but now it is just another manufacturer among many offering inexpensively made tools. Here in the frozen north, Canadian Tire's Mastercraft branded tools used to be a close second behind Craftsman- now I almost feel they are a little better.
 

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I only referenced Snap on cuz its a tool thats paid off over the years. When I had a wrench in my hand 8hrs a day for 5yrs SO made sense. Now that I rarely touch a tool I could never justify it. In the 90s there was a huge difference between Craftsman wrench design and SO's. Now I really have no idea since the tools I bought back then are still all very useful and usable. Can't remember the last time I had to buy tools other than for some special purpose like ball joint sockets or a tile saw. Not to mention dad leaving me 69yrs worth of tool accumulation to sort through. I wish we would have gotten on board with metric when he was wrenching in the mid 70s. I must have 60 1/2" wrenches alone.
 
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