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Looks like I am going to be purchasing a welder to do some mods for my YJ. Can anyone tell me if I should get a 220 volt over a 110 volt, should I get a mig over a tig and should I get gas over flux core.
 

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get a 220 and a mig, fig is to hard to do in tight positions under your jeep and mig is perfect for what your gonna do, i would get a miller or lincoln
 

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MIG is a pretty good option as far as home welders are concerned. Buy a quality unit, Lincoln, Miller, Hobart are all good names. If you want a tool that lasts, stay away from the stuff Harbor Freight sells. I have a Hobart Handler 140 which is a 110V unit. It's fine for anything up to 1/4", great for sheet metal. I welded new pans in my YJ with it as well as patching a hole in the tub.

Voltage range is a toss up. If you are set up for 220V in your shop and can afford the welder, that's the route to go. You can dial down a bigger welder a lot easier than you dial up a liitle one. Duty cycle is important. That's the number of minutes you can weld before you give the unit a break.

Go with gas. Using an argon/co2 mix with solid wire will give you much better welds than the flux cored stuff. Check out the prices on bottles and refills from multiple shops. Sometimes there's a fair difference in prices.

Use good wire. I keep seeing guys scrimp on wire and it's not worth it. Lincoln wire is pretty good. The quality is consistent plus you can get it at Tractor Supply, Lowes, and Home Depot.

It's always nice to have a welder cart to hold your unit and gas tank. A good helmet is a plus as well.

Hope this helped.
 

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The arc on a MIG is very 'tight' or small compared to a stick welder. That's why some weldors refer to them as 'short-arc' machines. In order to get good penetration be sure to actually put the arc where you want the penetration to occur. Do not rely on letting the metal flow from one side to the other. The thicker the metal the more important this is. Thin metal, not so important.
 

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My welder is a Lincoln Pro-Mig 180. It runs off 220, and is capable of Mig, Flux core, and if i buy a spool gun it will do aluminum too. It came in a ready to weld kit with a spool of both solid core (MIG) and innersheild (Flux) wire, several different tips, a regulator for the Argon bottle, welding gun with both gas and gasless nozzles, ground, cheese dick handheld face shield, a sweetass instruction DVD, and a few other odds and ends.

Here's the link.
http://www.lincolnelectric.com/en-us/Equipment/Pages/product.aspx?product=k2481-1(LincolnElectric)

I picked mine up for $500 new in unopened box, Looks like Lowes has them for $670 before tax, Amazon want's almost $800!

Shop Lincoln Electric 240-Volt MIG Flux-Cored Wire Feed Welder at Lowes.com

http://www.amazon.com/Lincoln-Electric-Wire-Welder-K2481-1/dp/B0016Q7C94
 

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I grabbed a tub that needed patchwork before I could install it. I grabbed an Esab 220 volt mig welder off of Craigslist for $700 with a full size argon/carbon bottle and a full spool of wire. Model is Migmaster 251. I was debating over a 110 home depot style welder and a nice 220 volt welder that would have little limitations. I was not setup for 220 at the time. It did not take much at all to setup 220 in my garage, especially since I know people and was able to pickup scrap electrical parts. The dials are not "slotted" on my machine, compared to a Lincoln or Miller where you have predetermined slots on the dial. Therefore in essence I have infinite voltage and speed combinations. I welded the thin stuff on the tub, and I am now welding the thicker stuff on the frame. The Esab works like a dream. I have practically no limitations on what I can weld. For a couple hundred bucks more compared to a home depot setup, it was well worth it and I got a sub panel in the garage now and the service upgraded because of it. A bottle fill/swap costs me under $20 and the $80 spool of wire that came with it will probably last me for years to come. I hear that flux cored stuff really smokes bad.

Shop around long enough and you'll get a good deal.
 

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I have two welders, a cheap fluxcore (use good wire, like lincoln and you'll be fine) that I got from Harbor Freight for $150 and a nicer gas Miller that I got after I became a bit more proficient. Truth be told, the HF welder does 90% of what I need. If you're just going to do a bit here and there, that may be all you need too. Now, if you're going to spend a few hours a week welding, spring for the nicer stuff.
 

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get a 220 and a mig, fig is to hard to do in tight positions under your jeep and mig is perfect for what your gonna do, i would get a miller or lincoln
What the hell is a fig welder?!? Do we also need pear or apple welders?!? ;)

Seriously, I agree, get a 220 MIG and get one that is set up for gas as well. Lincoln, Hobart and Clarke are all good ones. Remember, you get what you pay for so stay away from HF!
 

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What the hell is a fig welder?!? Do we also need pear or apple welders?!? ;)

Seriously, I agree, get a 220 MIG and get one that is set up for gas as well. Lincoln, Hobart and Clarke are all good ones. Remember, you get what you pay for so stay away from HF!
Lol
 

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The arc on a MIG is very 'tight' or small compared to a stick welder. That's why some weldors refer to them as 'short-arc' machines. In order to get good penetration be sure to actually put the arc where you want the penetration to occur. Do not rely on letting the metal flow from one side to the other. The thicker the metal the more important this is. Thin metal, not so important.
I've been running into more and more areas where a stick would be ideal - too tight for the mig. Might have to upgrade to 2 welders...
 

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Get a millermatic 210 or 211 can't remember, its what I have and its a auto set and runs off gas
 

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I have an Eastwood 175. It's a 230v machine and lays down a really nice bead - as nice as the Miller and Lincoln I've also used.. It was $500 delivered and included a spoolgun, 035 and 030 mig wire and a roll of aluminum wire as well. Awfully hard to beat for the $$$.

Only issue is - if you want it to be portable - prolly want a 110v unit that can be used anywhere. I have a 50ft extension for the 230 but have needed longer.
 

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A 110VAC is sometimes handy for the smaller jobs where 220 isn't readily available, although I do prefer my 220.




If you can afford it - I HIGHY recommend a good hood as well. My sight isn't what it use to be & a high quality hood made a big difference for me.

I have 4 different hoods - I prefer this Speedglas hands-down.


 

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Discussion Starter #14
Finally got the welder plus..

Santa was good to me. I got a Eastwood 200 Tig welder that is 110/220 volts a Eastwood 175 Mig welder 220 volts only and a Eastwood 60 Plasma cutter 220 volts only. Know putting a 220 volt outlet in the garage. All of this for just under $1800.00. They have a 30 day no hassle return and a 3yr warranty.
 

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X2 on the Lincoln Pro-Mig 180. Go with flux cored wire .030 cored wire. They are a very versatile welder. The key to a good weld is getting the metal you are welding clean... use a wire brush or sanding wheel.
The Flux Cored wire is my choice because it is way more forgiving... the slag is easy to chip or wire brush away... welds better over questionable steel and you don't have to worry about wind blowing the gas away while welding...
Auto Darkening welding hoods are good as well..... they're nice when working in confined spaces....
I run a welding and fabrication business that also installs our own steel products... the Lincoln is what we use in the field / jobsites...
 

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Santa was good to me. I got a Eastwood 200 Tig welder that is 110/220 volts a Eastwood 175 Mig welder 220 volts only and a Eastwood 60 Plasma cutter 220 volts only. Know putting a 220 volt outlet in the garage. All of this for just under $1800.00. They have a 30 day no hassle return and a 3yr warranty.
Have you tried the Eastwoods yet? I was completely surprised at the quality on such inexpensive welders. Haven't used the spoolgun yet but some Al work is on the bench right now.
 

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I've got the Hobart 210MVP - it'll run on either 220V or 110V, and comes with both plugs. It's more limited on thickness at 110V, of course.

It'll also do gas or flux core. Up to 3/8" thick material. I use it exclusively with gas, so I can't comment on the flux core performance.

Great little welder. Not the cheapest, but very versatile for a home shop.
 

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I had to do the same plus bought a 25ft extension cord to match online for $63. I needed to get around the barn a little to do projects like the jeep.
 
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