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I’m getting ready to undertake replacing the oil pump on my 2013 Jeep wrangler and am looking for tips, recommendations, resources, etc.

History:

About a year and half ago the Jeep started spitting the P06DD code, I don’t believe it ever went into limp mode (based on how others have described it) but I did experience considerably power lose. For about a week it was rolling the dice rather the code would pop or not… after about a week the code was always there. This is the first mechanical issue I've had with the Jeep with over 100k miles on it. Money was tight at the time and I didn’t need to drive it, so I parked it. This past weekend I pulled it out with the intention to get it going again.

From doing research on this code it seems it could be a couple things, the oil pressure sending unit, the oil pressure sensor, or the oil pump itself. I’m electing to just replace it all, unless one of you gurus recommends otherwise. I have found a PDF walkthrough on the oil pump replacement and video for the oil pressure sending unit (linked below). I’m hoping you kind members of this forum can help me with a few questions and provide any tips, recommendations, or additional resources….

Questions:

  1. While I’m undertaking this I’d like to go ahead and replace any “ware and tare” components that are “right there” while replacing the aforementioned components, any recommendations on what to go ahead and replace?
  2. Any recommendations for the replacement oil pump? Part #s? I’ve seen some posts about Crown Automotive oil pumps, is this just for the older jeeps?
  3. How difficult is this going to be in a driveway? I have access to a lift but would prefer not to drive / haul it to that location.
  4. Any tools recommended to make things easier?

Resources:
Oil Pump Removal PDF

 

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I also have a '13 and I've replaced the oil pressure sensor (same thing as sending unit) twice since owning it. Jeep had issues with these units and revised them several times. I've had no problems since the last replacement a couple years ago. If it's failing, it can produce several different codes including the one you got. The power loss you experienced is from the engine not being willing to rev above ~3200 once the code hits. It's designed to protect the engine from damage due to lack of lubrication.

You can definitely do both in your driveway, although having a covered space to protect you from the elements would be better. Before you replace the oil pump, I would replace the sensor and see if that clears this up for you. It's an easier and cheaper job. I would also stick with OEM parts for this. You're not going to want to be re-doing these repairs again because a cheap aftermarket part failed in a year.

I have the service manual procedure I could dig up if you need it. Getting the sensor out can be done with standard tools, although there's very little clearance for the sensor itself. A Crowfoot wrench or oil pressure sensor wrench would probably work best.
 

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I imagine it's much more likely to have a bad sensor than a bad oil pump.
I'd definitely do the oil pressure sensor first and see where that takes you.
While you're at it, replace the oil temp sensor as well - they're located next to each other:

GUID-09-013-000-2710795.jpg
Oil temperature sensor (1) and oil pressure sensor (2)

On that engine, those two sensors are critical to the management of the dual-speed oil pump, which is turn is critical to the variable valve timing system.

The oil pressure is high (65 psi min, usually 85-ish) whenever oil is cold (<190F approx.) or when oil is at operating temp and rpm above 3,500 approx.
If oil is at operating temp (>190F) and rpm under 3,500 the pressure drops to a low setting (29 psi min, usually 40-ish)

So change the sensors then verify that the oil pressure is sufficient and changes as described above. And if not then think of replacing the oil pump.
 

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^^^^ what he said.

Plus you could even change the oil cooler assembly together with the switches as well.

The oil cooler assembly comes with these swiches and cost around $300 and it appears to fail often enough to justify preemptive replacement. So while you are in there, it would make sense to change it all.
 

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^^^^ what he said.

Plus you could even change the oil cooler assembly together with the switches as well.

The oil cooler assembly comes with these swiches and cost around $300 and it appears to fail often enough to justify preemptive replacement. So while you are in there, it would make sense to change it all.
Changing the oil cooler housing does add a fair amount of extra work since it requires you drain and then refill/burp the cooling system. To do that right you should really be using vacuum since it can be difficult to get all the air out of that engine otherwise. The housing's not that hard to get to, and if it isn't broke, I wouldn't fix it.
 

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Changing the oil cooler housing does add a fair amount of extra work since it requires you drain and then refill/burp the cooling system. To do that right you should really be using vacuum since it can be difficult to get all the air out of that engine otherwise. The housing's not that hard to get to, and if it isn't broke, I wouldn't fix it.
You don't need to drain the entire system, just take a bit of coolant out. You can use a transfer pump or suck some coolant out of the radiator through the filler neck and into a container, so that coolant level is just below the oil cooler housing assembly.

Once the job is done, you can just fill everything back from the container into the radiator and the rest that did not fit back into the radiator, fill into the overflow bottle.

There is no need to use vacuum to bleed the system. Shop mechanics use it to get a bit of convenience and speed (and in some cases even that is questionable). Burping a system isn't hard if you know what you are doing and especially if you have time for a few full warm up and cool down cycles.

Further keep in mind that those switches are in plastic threads. When you undue them and they happen to be stuck, you will likely be using some rather excessive torque in their removal process. As a result you can easily introduce a crack starting at the threads and notice this newly created leak only later after your put everything back together.
 

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@Wrangleur - the Jeep recommended method is to drain the system and refill using vacuum. This is what I did when I replaced my housing and it ensures there aren't any air pockets and makes refilling quick and easy. To be fair, I was due for a coolant change around that time anyway.

I'm not saying you're wrong for draining a little coolant out and then going through a traditional bleed procedure. It does however seem like enough people have issues getting all the air out of the pentastar cooling system as it is (all those people complaining of hearing gurgling, general poor cooling performance, etc..) that introducing that complexity to replace a part that isn't broken probably doesn't make sense. Plus $300 isn't the cheapest, and if it turns out the OP's oil pump actually is the problem, he's going to have to buy that too.

I honestly can't remember if the housing threads are plastic or if they have a metal insert for the sensors. I changed my sensor twice before replacing the housing and when the housing failed, it wasn't the sensor port. Mine failed at the oil input port and I think it was the o-ring that finally gave up. I couldn't see any obvious cracks.
 
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