Jeep Wrangler Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

I'm going to be doing a clutch replacement on my 2015 JK soon. I'm going to be ordering the following parts:

Clutch Kit - LUK 01061
Master Cylinder - LUK LMC603
Slave Cylinder - LUK LSC582

I'm looking to get a new flywheel too but can't seem to find one anywhere online for the 2015 JK. Can anyone help me out with any recommendations?

Am I missing any parts that I need to order? Any recommendations on other brands?

Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
I agree, for years I have heard that you do not re-face flywheels (all vehicles).. the hot spots return!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
LUK clutch is a good choice. I would stay away from anything centerforce and wise decision to do the master and slave at the same time. Make sure you do replace the pilot bearing that will come in your kit.

Flywheel info:

Check flywheel runout whenever misalignment is suspected. Flywheel runout should not exceed 0.08 mm (0.003 in.). Measure runout at the outer edge of the flywheel face with a dial indicator. Mount the indicator on a stud installed in place of one of the flywheel bolts.

Common causes of runout are:

•heat warpage
•improper machining
•incorrect bolt tightening
•improper seating on crankshaft flange shoulder
•foreign material on crankshaft flange

Flywheel machining is not recommended. The flywheel clutch surface is machined to a unique contour and machining will negate this feature. Minor flywheel scoring can be cleaned up by hand with 180 grit emery or with surface grinding equipment. Remove only enough material to reduce scoring (approximately 0.001 - 0.003 in.). Heavy stock removal is not recommended. Replace the flywheel if scoring is severe and deeper than 0.076 mm (0.003 in.). Excessive stock removal can result in flywheel cracking or warpage after installation; it can also weaken the flywheel and interfere with proper clutch release.

Clean the crankshaft flange before mounting the flywheel. Dirt and grease on the flange surface may cock the flywheel causing excessive runout. Use new bolts when remounting a flywheel and secure the bolts with Mopar Lock And Seal or equivalent. Tighten flywheel bolts to specified torque only. Overtightening can distort the flywheel hub causing runout.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
929 Posts
LUK clutch is a good choice. I would stay away from anything centerforce and wise decision to do the master and slave at the same time. Make sure you do replace the pilot bearing that will come in your kit.

Flywheel info:

Check flywheel runout whenever misalignment is suspected. Flywheel runout should not exceed 0.08 mm (0.003 in.). Measure runout at the outer edge of the flywheel face with a dial indicator. Mount the indicator on a stud installed in place of one of the flywheel bolts.

Common causes of runout are:

•heat warpage
•improper machining
•incorrect bolt tightening
•improper seating on crankshaft flange shoulder
•foreign material on crankshaft flange

Flywheel machining is not recommended. The flywheel clutch surface is machined to a unique contour and machining will negate this feature. Minor flywheel scoring can be cleaned up by hand with 180 grit emery or with surface grinding equipment. Remove only enough material to reduce scoring (approximately 0.001 - 0.003 in.). Heavy stock removal is not recommended. Replace the flywheel if scoring is severe and deeper than 0.076 mm (0.003 in.). Excessive stock removal can result in flywheel cracking or warpage after installation; it can also weaken the flywheel and interfere with proper clutch release.

Clean the crankshaft flange before mounting the flywheel. Dirt and grease on the flange surface may cock the flywheel causing excessive runout. Use new bolts when remounting a flywheel and secure the bolts with Mopar Lock And Seal or equivalent. Tighten flywheel bolts to specified torque only. Overtightening can distort the flywheel hub causing runout.
Why do you not recommend centerforce?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,479 Posts
The LUK kit includes the release bearing! I've read that you shouldn't resurface the flywheel on a jeep, is that wrong?

I was looking at the Centerforce Billet Steel Flywheel 700476.
I would replace the flywheel if I had even the slightest amount of doubt. I would also look into Centerforce II clutch and related parts if you haven't placed your order yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
43 Posts
Why do you not recommend centerforce?
I've had a number of issues over a number of installs in years past (to be fair, none in the Jeep world). Too soft pedal, too hard, interia blocks jamming, idle rattles, disc coming apart, etc. I gave up on them long ago but it seems you'll also find similar unfavorable reviews recently too on the forums. I personally cannot justify the cost vs claimed benefit over just a quality replacement like oem or Luk.

I would replace the flywheel if I had even the slightest amount of doubt. I would also look into Centerforce II clutch and related parts if you haven't placed your order yet.
The flywheel is a dual mass design and not like the standard one piece designs of old. They are pricey and while I'm the last person to dissuade someone from knocking it all out while you're in there, if it's within the above tolerances and at a cost of $450+, there's really no need to replace.

Edit: And to add to the list of things wise to replace; add the clutch fork and pivot ball. Wear on these results in some of the creaking noises some are hearing.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,479 Posts
I've had a number of issues over a number of installs in years past (to be fair, none in the Jeep world). Too soft pedal, too hard, interia blocks jamming, idle rattles, disc coming apart, etc. I gave up on them long ago but it seems you'll also find similar unfavorable reviews recently too on the forums. I personally cannot justify the cost vs claimed benefit over just a quality replacement like oem or Luk.



The flywheel is a dual mass design and not like the standard one piece designs of old. They are pricey and while I'm the last person to dissuade someone from knocking it all out while you're in there, if it's within the above tolerances and at a cost of $450+, there's really no need to replace.

Edit: And to add to the list of things wise to replace; add the clutch fork and pivot ball. Wear on these results in some of the creaking noises some are hearing.
Yes, we agree. I said if I had any doubt I'd replace it. If it passes muster I'd clean it up and use it again. Dropping a transmission twice is something I try to avoid.

I think we agree on the Centerforce clutch too. I tried LUK, Ram, OE, and factory remanufactured once, [never again for that] in other applications and hands down the Centerforce II clutch was the best. That's what I would use in a Wrangler based on past performance.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top