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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone! I'm considering starting a business manufacturing winch lines and similar recovery gear in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. I'm wondering if you would like to tell me a bit about what you were looking for when you bought your last synthetic winch line, and give me feedback on some prototype designs that I've been working on.

What is important to you on a synthetic winch rope?

What do you wish your winch rope had or could do that it does not?

Is it worth the extra expense to buy a rope that's made in Canada or the USA from domestic manufactured rope, such as Amsteel Blue?
 

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I wish you success, your stuff looks nice and the quality looks tops. Like any other business startups it takes a long time to get started and get your name out there. I would also say that the UTV market is much larger then the Jeep market with this type of product, all their vehicles are off-road and like my Polaris Ranger I carry these items on board. Good Luck

trainman
 

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yes North American made is important to me, but so is affordability. I like what you did to protect both ends.
 

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I don't think I've used a hook in years. There are so many good d rings and shackles that I'd rather use. If you can put some options for those from the get go then I think you have another great starting point.


Current build: 2016 JKUR Hardrock #HardrockREVjku
Past builds: '79 & '81 CJ7, 93 ZJ, 04 TJ Rubi
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There are so many good d rings and shackles that I'd rather use. If you can put some options for those from the get go then I think you have another great starting point.
Good point! I have the contact issue for someone at Factor55, and an going to get in touch with him next week. I'm thinking that the Splicer would make a nice pre-installed option.

Do you think that people would go for a line with a bare thimble and Crosby G209A 3/4" 7ton shackle pre-installed?
 

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Good point! I have the contact issue for someone at Factor55, and an going to get in touch with him next week. I'm thinking that the Splicer would make a nice pre-installed option.

Do you think that people would go for a line with a bare thimble and Crosby G209A 3/4" 7ton shackle pre-installed?


Factor 55 is quality for sure. Another company trying to get out in the market with some of their aftermarket gear is AMI Styling. They've got a number of products one of which is an interesting take on d-rings. They might be willing to team up on some stuff.


Current build: 2016 JKUR Hardrock #HardrockREVjku
Past builds: '79 & '81 CJ7, 93 ZJ, 04 TJ Rubi
 

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Check out the recovery gear from Southeast Overland. Their kinetic ropes are first class. Great products, competitive prices, and very good CS. I like to support small businesses wherever I can.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Another company trying to get out in the market with some of their aftermarket gear is AMI Styling. They've got a number of products one of which is an interesting take on d-rings.
I just took a look at their site. Holy crispy crap!!
:jawdrop:
$180 for two shackles? Their 2:1 design factor means that their breaking strength is 36,000 lb.

A Crosby G209A 3/4" shackle with a hoisting working load limit of 7 tons, and 4.5:1 hoisting design factor, has a breaking strength of 63,000lb. At a 3:1 winching design factor they will safely pull 21,000lb. I can get them for less than $25 USD.

The AMI shackles do look pretty, though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Check out the recovery gear from Southeast Overland. Their kinetic ropes are first class. Great products, competitive prices, and very good CS. I like to support small businesses wherever I can.
Yes, they make excellent gear, that's for sure!
 

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What I am looking for and what really needs to be developed is a line that is not impacted by UV. The chemists need to get busy.
 

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What I am looking for and what really needs to be developed is a line that is not impacted by UV. The chemists need to get busy.
I found a good solution to protecting my synthetic rope. I ordered a couple 4 foot pieces of 5/8 inch heats hiring tubing from Amazon and covered the last (hook end) of the rope with it. Part of the outer layer on the drum is protected by the heat shrink part Especially important, the portion that is exposed from the fairlead to where the hook is secured is covered. I playing-dipped the part of the rope securing the hook. To cover the drum I cut a piece of old truck bed liner to fit over it.
 

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Oh I have my rope protected from the eliminates but if I used it a lot it would not be. Replacing a rope every 2 years is expensive and I am thinking the manufactures can do better.
 

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My most important aspects when I shopped for my synth winch line. I have a 12K winch which is common. I didn't need an inner anchor attachment, since my winch has a round hole to insert the line into on the drum. That may be important for others, but it wasn't for me. I ended up having to cut the anchor off the line I purchased.

My most important aspects, listed highest to the lowest of preference priority.
- Price <$200 USD
- > 18K lb load capacity
- 3/8" diameter
- > 90' length
- 3 meters inner heat guard to protect line from drum heat
- 1 meter outer covering for UV protection
- Stainless steal thimble loop
- Dark neutral color (Black/Grey)
- Ability to purchase line separately, or package and save with other items such as Aluminum Hawse fairlead
 

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I found a good solution to protecting my synthetic rope. I ordered a couple 4 foot pieces of 5/8 inch heats hiring tubing from Amazon and covered the last (hook end) of the rope with it. Part of the outer layer on the drum is protected by the heat shrink part Especially important, the portion that is exposed from the fairlead to where the hook is secured is covered. I playing-dipped the part of the rope securing the hook. To cover the drum I cut a piece of old truck bed liner to fit over it.
I want to know more about your bumper modification to fit the winch in it. Do you have a writeup on it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I found a good solution to protecting my synthetic rope. I ordered a couple 4 foot pieces of 5/8 inch heats hiring tubing from Amazon and covered the last (hook end) of the rope with it. Part of the outer layer on the drum is protected by the heat shrink part Especially important, the portion that is exposed from the fairlead to where the hook is secured is covered. I playing-dipped the part of the rope securing the hook. To cover the drum I cut a piece of old truck bed liner to fit over it.
I have to say, that install is GORGEOUS.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I found a good solution to protecting my synthetic rope. I ordered a couple 4 foot pieces of 5/8 inch heats hiring tubing from Amazon and covered the last (hook end) of the rope with it. Part of the outer layer on the drum is protected by the heat shrink part Especially important, the portion that is exposed from the fairlead to where the hook is secured is covered.
Out of curiosity, do you experience harsh winters? If so, how much winter action has your heat shrink seen? I'm considering using heat shrink on a couple parts of my line, and am wondering if it gets brittle in the cold.
 

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Out of curiosity, do you experience harsh winters? If so, how much winter action has your heat shrink seen? I'm considering using heat shrink on a couple parts of my line, and am wondering if it gets brittle in the cold.
I don't have harsh winters. I'm usually in the Memphis, TN or Atlanta, GA area. I haven't noticed any issues with it, but then again, I've never used below about 50 degrees. But after some cold periods, I pulled my rope out and rewound it just to exercise the winch and I didn't notice any changes. The 8 feet of rope that has the tubing on it is a lot stiffer than the unprotected part but still flexible enough to wind easily on the drum. Not sure what very cold weather would be like. The product I used was two four foot length of Uxcell dual wall, adhesive lined heat shirk tubing, 5/8" before shrink, 3:1, shrink. It has a temperature raring of -55 to 125 degrees. About $7 each.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
The 8 feet of rope that has the tubing on it is a lot stiffer than the unprotected part but still flexible enough to wind easily on the drum. Not sure what very cold weather would be like. The product I used was two four foot length of Uxcell dual wall, adhesive lined heat shirk tubing, 5/8" before shrink, 3:1, shrink. It has a temperature raring of -55 to 125 degrees. About $7 each.
Ok, thanks. I'm using double-walled shrink tubing as well, however it's not nearly that cheap in my part of Canada, even from the industrial supply houses. In my case, I paid $21 CAD (about $16 USD) for a 5' section of 3/4" double-walled tubing. So far I'm just using it in my prototypes to provide a soft section around the thimble, to avoid scratching hawse fairleads, and around the lug ends to keep them from abraiding the line on the drum.

Maybe I will put a chunk on a section of line and toss it in the freezer to see how stiff and/or brittle it gets...
 

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One of the biggest issues with rope is MAINTENANCE. if you don't clean it the dirt and dust acts like sand paper and wears away the fibers until they fail.

THis is CO and UT grit I washed out my Masterpull line

 
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