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Hey everyone..

So like the title says.. I am moving from Miami to Arizona. The trip is about 2,200 miles. I've towed trailers before but not at this distance and not with a JKU.

The 5x8 U-Haul trailer is 900lbs without anything in it. I'm adding my personal belongings: All light: A couch, desk, 2 coffee tables, 2 shelves and maybe 15 boxes of random items.

I'll be driving very slow and being very cautious in regards to overheating. Just had a fresh oil change. Anything else you guys can recommend for me would be a huge help. I'm a bit nervous, tbh.

Thanks!
 

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I routinely tow a pop-up camper with my JKU with no problems at all. It weights a little over 2,000 lbs. My JKU is rated to tow 3,500 lbs. I honestly would not think twice about towing the U-haul trailer with furniture.
 

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Hey everyone..

So like the title says.. I am moving from Miami to Arizona. The trip is about 2,200 miles. I've towed trailers before but not at this distance and not with a JKU.

The 5x8 U-Haul trailer is 900lbs without anything in it. I'm adding my personal belongings: All light: A couch, desk, 2 coffee tables, 2 shelves and maybe 15 boxes of random items.

I'll be driving very slow and being very cautious in regards to overheating. Just had a fresh oil change. Anything else you guys can recommend for me would be a huge help. I'm a bit nervous, tbh.

Thanks!
Sounds like you're within guidelines for your Jeep, FWIW you can find the tow ratings HERE

Pre-2012 auto JKs should add a trans cooler. 2012 + autos already have one. No worries if it's manual. Also a big brake kit is a great add-on for towing and every day driving.

As far as u-haul they will not rent to a soft top. So if you have a hard top you're OK, if you have a soft top you'll need an alternate plan.

Good luck and have fun :thumb:
 

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I’d tow that trailer with a Kia Rio @ 80+mph. Nothing to worry about. Make sure you’re hitched up right, chains crossed into a basket, trailer is riding at correct height, trailer is loaded correctly and all your tires are inflated correctly. Most of their trailers are equipped with surge brakes so you have some type of brakes on the trailer.


 

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Moved my mother in law from Iowa to Texas pulling a 6x12 loaded with household goods and furniture. It was before I was lifted and I have 3.73 auto. No issues other than keeping braking distance longer. Basic trailer safety and you'll be fine.
 

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The tow rating for a JKU automatic is 3,500 pounds. The load limit for most 5'x8' trailers (including the weight of the trailer) is 3,500 pounds.

I would not classify a couch as light, even if it's not a hide-a-bed, but what you list certainly would not over load the trailer.

Unsolicited advise - put the couch up front. Make darn sure the entire rig is as level as you can get it. Having the rear of the JKU down a little will not hurt. I would measure to a point on the rear of the vehicle, say the edge of the flare over a rear tire with the Jeep unhooked and empty. Try to keep the depression to about 1" with the trailer hooked up and loaded. Try to keep as much out of the rear of the Jeep as you can. You don't want a lot of weight in the rear of the Jeep with the trailer hooked up and loaded.

As I am sure you can remember either a nose up or nose down trailer can be a very mean pull. I have a 5'x 10' open utility trailer I use to haul my golf cart and zero turn when needed. I pull it either with my JKU or the TJ (it's light enough with the golf cart so the TJ does a good job). I invested in one of these to keep it level with either Jeep:
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B008CE06ZA/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


I am going to assume you already have the either the towing package on the JKU or an aftermarket hitch and 4 flat connector. Otherwise U-Haul will install them for $$$$.

Somewhere I have a picture of a 4x6 U-Haul enclosed trailer behind my 1966 TR-4A when moving from Norfolk, Va to Key West, Fl when I was in the Navy in the training command between the time I got my wings and reported to my Fleet ASW Squadron at NAS Norfolk. I rented another one to get back to Norfolk when I finished the flying in Key West. Course there was no furniture in it, just lots of personal stuff that wouldn't fit in the TR-4A. That was in the fall of 1966. The TR-4A did just fine, never got over heated.

The JKU should do fine. I wouldn't go too slow, around 55-60 should do fine. Yeah, U-Haul says 45, but at that speed it will seem like you are crawling. Of course the JKU would do a bit better with 3.73, but my 2015 did fine and it had 3.21s. My Chief has the max towing with 3.73s and I wouldn't hesitate to haul that trailer with either one.
 

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The tow rating for a JKU automatic is 3,500 pounds. The load limit for most 5'x8' trailers (including the weight of the trailer) is 3,500 pounds.

I would not classify a couch as light, even if it's not a hide-a-bed, but what you list certainly would not over load the trailer.

Unsolicited advise - put the couch up front. Make darn sure the entire rig is as level as you can get it. Having the rear of the JKU down a little will not hurt. I would measure to a point on the rear of the vehicle, say the edge of the flare over a rear tire with the Jeep unhooked and empty. Try to keep the depression to about 1" with the trailer hooked up and loaded. Try to keep as much out of the rear of the Jeep as you can. You don't want a lot of weight in the rear of the Jeep with the trailer hooked up and loaded.

As I am sure you can remember either a nose up or nose down trailer can be a very mean pull. I have a 5'x 10' open utility trailer I use to haul my golf cart and zero turn when needed. I pull it either with my JKU or the TJ (it's light enough with the golf cart so the TJ does a good job). I invested in one of these to keep it level with either Jeep:
https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B008CE06ZA/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Solid advise. Loading is key.
 

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The tow rating for a JKU automatic is 3,500 pounds.
Great packing advise!

But to clarify not all JKU have a 3500 tow rating, only the 3.73 and 4.10 geared JKU get that rating (auto or manual). OP didn't state what year his JKU was nor did he clarify auto or manual trans, so his tow rating could be as little as 1,000 pounds max.

The link in my post above lists all model years and their ratings.
 

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I towed a 5x8 utility trailer from Arizona to Alaska with my 2015 JKUR. I have 4.10 gears and the auto and it did just fine. I was at 2000 to 2500 lbs. You won't hit any significant mountain ranges, so you'll be just fine.
 

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look into pods. i towed a 4x8 with a 2004 Liberty from boulder to LA when my daughter finished college. it worked out fine, but i wouldn’t do it again, and didn’t when we moved to SF. by the time you factor the cost of u-haul, wear and tear on your rig, brakes, tires, engine, accommodations unless you do it in a day, etc, it might be a wash. pods drop the container at your doorstep (or hers), you pack it up. they come get it, and drop it off at new location. no muss, no fuss.
 

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Just make sure you load it correctly. You need around 350 lbs of tongue weight if the trailer is at max weight.

Load it too front heavy or too back heavy will cause stability problems. That is even more critical in a short wheelbase vehicle.

I tow a pop up camper all the time to the trails. I have a 2 dr so weight balance is even more critical. I did add a friction sway bar which helps a lot in keeping the tail from wagging the dog.

Just be smart with how you load it, allow plenty of stopping distance and go for it.
 

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Just make sure you load it correctly. You need around 350 lbs of tongue weight if the trailer is at max weight.

Load it too front heavy or too back heavy will cause stability problems. That is even more critical in a short wheelbase vehicle.

I tow a pop up camper all the time to the trails. I have a 2 dr so weight balance is even more critical. I did add a friction sway bar which helps a lot in keeping the tail from wagging the dog.

Just be smart with how you load it, allow plenty of stopping distance and go for it.
Some additional information is required here. 10% tongue weight is a goal and not a requirement. If you don't have 350 lbs of payload available you run the very possibility of not having enough weight on the front end and lose control because you can't steer. This is much more serious than not enough tongue weight.

On the other hand to little tongue weight can lead to speed induced trailer sway. 10-15 percent tongue weight is what is required if you intend to run the speed limit (up to 80 mph) provide you have the payload that will allow that much tongue weight. You can drop below those norms provided you are willing to slow down, as low as 5%. I normally when pulling heavy keep my tongue weight down to about 7% but I never exceed 60 mph.

And that leads to the moral of the story. Regardless if your tongue weight is 10% plus or 5% slow down. In 90% of trailer accidents speed is the biggest cause.
 

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Most well built trailers are structured so that even if they are empty they have enough tongue weight as a percentage of their total weight they track true and don't sway. Of all the trailers I have hauled over the years, only one was structured so that when empty it did not have enough tongue weight.

That was a canoe trailer that had been donated to the local Scout camp. I took it on as a project and took it to a friend of mine and we evaluated it. (It also had a bent tongue from someone backing it up too sharply. We replace the tongue on it and moved the axle back 6" so that it had enough tongue weight to track properly. When I pulled it back out to the camp (empty) it pulled like a dream and heavily loaded with 10 canoes and gear it still pulls like a dream.

The 350 pound of tongue weight is a max not a target Over 350 pounds of tongue weight the Jeep will be too rear heavy, one of the reasons the max trailer weight when loaded is 3500 pounds.
 

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… and maybe 15 boxes of random items.

I have had some reluctant experience helping "friends" move. Those 15 boxes can easily add up to 500 lbs. :hide:
 

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I recently towed UHaul 5x8 trailers 300 miles, twice. No problem.

I have a JKUR that had 4:10 gears at the time but with 35" tires so it was undergeared.

As mentioned above you'll need the hardtop on to rent the trailer, check the tow rating of your particular Jeep based on transmission and gearing, load trailer heavier toward the front.

UHaul make loading easier by having the wheels far back, so it's very hard to load them tail-heavy anyway.

The biggest UHaul trailer I've towed with the JK was a dual axle 6x12 and that was a handful! But the 5x8 is easy.

Just monitor your temp. Also whatever gear you use to climb a hill, use the same on the way down. Personally I drive right at the speed limit whenever towing.
 
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