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So I’m at the dealer today for some routine maintenance and started a conversation about lifts and any advice or recommendations based on issues he’s seen come in the shop.

He told me don’t lift your Wrangler or add bigger tires. It will change the geometry and stress the driveline causing lots of problems up to and including failed axels.

So I asked if they installed Mopar lifts and if so so do the same concerns exist. He said it was a factory lift designed to address concerns with the driveline and wouldn’t recommend any 3rd party lifts. Since I’m out of warranty (2013 JKUS) I asked if he’d seen any issues with the Teraflex 2.5 coil/shock lift I’m planning. He repeated his statement and said “Do it at your own risk”.

So my question to all with Teraflex and AEV lifts: have you experienced any driveline catastrophes? Is this just the dealer being cautious based on seeing too many failures from shoddy work?

Any add-on’s you would recommend in addition to the lift kit to reduce driveline stress?
 

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What dealer is this? I wanna make sure I never use them.
 

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he could have just said he didnt know jack **** about lifts.....
 

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Print off the items included in the “Mopar” list and one comparable from Teraflex or Rock Krawler and ask the dealer how Mopar is designed differently.

Your dealer is talking out of his bum and has no idea what he is talking about. I’m not saying I’m smart, but that’s a stupid comment.

Yes lifting will put your suspension geometry out of sorts but a quality lift kit will include items to put it back in sync.


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It makes good business sense for the dealer to tell you this and frankly, IMO he needs to do this to protect himself and Jeep from liability and lawsuits. I would think a Jeep dealer might be hesitant to give a customer a thumb's up or encouragement to install any third party lifts for those reasons, in the event something goes wrong, someone is in a crash, etc. and a plaintiff's personal injury lawyer starts pointing fingers.

To be clear, I'm not saying the dealer is necessarily right (but some of the stuff he mentioned is correct- lifts do change geometry and larger tires do put more stress on components, but we all know that and hopefully we address those issues as much as possible when doing our respective builds), just posting my thoughts about why the dealer responded in that manner.

My best friend owns two new car dealerships, and I have heard so many horror stories about dealing with the general public so I am more understanding about dealer motivations.

Perhaps others have had different experience with Jeep dealers. Has anyone ever had a Jeep dealer install a third party lift for you?
 

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@Ugoderosa my dealer installed my Rock Krawler lift. Been there numerous times for warranty claims without any issues.
Ok, thanks, that is interesting to me. I guess I never thought about having my dealer install a third party lift because I assumed they would decline. Learn something new everyday.
 

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Print off the items included in the “Mopar” list and one comparable from Teraflex or Rock Krawler and ask the dealer how Mopar is designed differently.
Why does it even matter? The OP's Wrangler is out of warranty so what the service dept thinks, is not relevant.


Though, I could add that the dealer might have seen some really bad lift installs, over the years, installed by people who couldn't tell a wrench from a toaster. :D
 
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Of course a lift done poorly can create issues. I did a ton of research on this forum before doing mine - on a brand new 2017 JKUR. You owe it to yourself to educate yourself by reading. I can’t summarize here but I determined that a 2.5” AEV lift was right for me. I’ve had zero issues so far. I’m at 15k. I did use the geometry correct brackets although not everyone does.

When you go over 2.5”, there is more correction that is needed to avoid various issues that can arise — steering, drive shaft angles, etc. Less potential issues with a 2-2.5 as I understand it.

Plan to run 35”-37” tires? Of course that also can create premature wear issues. I went with 33” as a good compromise between what I wanted to achieve and not risking too many issues down the road with a new Jeep. And I use mine as a daily driver so I wanted to ensure good road handling.

I’m quite happy with my set up. YMMV. Read up.


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So my question to all with Teraflex and AEV lifts: have you experienced any driveline catastrophes? Is this just the dealer being cautious based on seeing too many failures from shoddy work?
I agree with everyone's comments so far. It just sounds like that "service advisor" doesn't know what he's talking about. Or isn't mod friendly. Heck, the service advisor at my dealership always wants to see what mods I've done whenever I come in because he's also "a wheeler",

To answer the OP's question (and I'm sure many others will testify similarly), I drive a '16 Rubicon and have the AEV 2.5" Dualsport XT with 35" tires and have re-geared for the bigger wheels. I wheel just about every weekend; sometimes its crawling on the technical trails and other times it's overlanding to some remote spot in the Sonoran Desert. My wife follows me just about everywhere in her non-modified '18 Rubicon.

While there is no denying that the stresses on my drive train are different than on my wife's (because of my bigger tires, lift, rooftop tent, full cargo area kitchen) I have not seen any drive train failures in 17,000 miles.

Will it eventually cause things to wear faster than if you leave it stock? Absolutely. That's simple physics. But it's not like you are going to blow up a pumpkin after 10 miles because you loaded too many groceries in the back.
 

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Ok, thanks, that is interesting to me. I guess I never thought about having my dealer install a third party lift because I assumed they would decline. Learn something new everyday.
Before i shopped around for lifts, i shopped around local offroad shops...
Several wouldn't touch customer supplied lift kits. They had issues with missing components and what not. They won't even price match online vendors, but thats ok... thats their rule.

Same with Dealers. They can only install their specified brands. Mopar, RE, and Teraflex to name a few... no RK, MC, and the rest.

Only 1 dealer let me purchase my own kit, and install it.

My oem warranty ends next month but it did save me $$ since i had several dealer warranted visits.
 

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Why does it even matter? The OP's Wrangler is out of warranty so what the service dept thinks, is not relevant.


Though, I could add that the dealer might have seen some really bad lift installs, over the years, installed by people who couldn't tell a wrench from a toaster. :D
My exact same thoughts 2 sentences in to his post. What would be the difference between the receptionist at the dentists office saying the same thing the dealer said? Neither is a responsible party in the matter.
 

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He told me don’t lift your Wrangler or add bigger tires. It will change the geometry and stress the driveline causing lots of problems up to and including failed axels.

Your dealer is correct.


On the other hand, driving it will cause stress and the axles to eventually fail too, so you shouldn't do that either.
 

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Why does it even matter? The OP's Wrangler is out of warranty so what the service dept thinks, is not relevant.


True, but some people actually listen and trust what the dealer tells them. It then gets repeated to others as what their dealer told them.


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So I’m at the dealer today for some routine maintenance and started a conversation about lifts and any advice or recommendations based on issues he’s seen come in the shop.

He told me don’t lift your Wrangler or add bigger tires. It will change the geometry and stress the driveline causing lots of problems up to and including failed axels.

So I asked if they installed Mopar lifts and if so so do the same concerns exist. He said it was a factory lift designed to address concerns with the driveline and wouldn’t recommend any 3rd party lifts. Since I’m out of warranty (2013 JKUS) I asked if he’d seen any issues with the Teraflex 2.5 coil/shock lift I’m planning. He repeated his statement and said “Do it at your own risk”.

So my question to all with Teraflex and AEV lifts: have you experienced any driveline catastrophes? Is this just the dealer being cautious based on seeing too many failures from shoddy work?

Any add-on’s you would recommend in addition to the lift kit to reduce driveline stress?
Unpopular opinion here. The rep was not wrong. He was as truthful as he could be while not over committing or disparaging the mopar branded kit. The way you related the answers they gave would make any brand lawyer happy.

If you modify your jeep, you absolutely increase the driveline stress. There is no way to reduce it. It is what it is.

So the question you should be asking is how to build/mod to increase the amount of stress the driveline can take. You will find that list to be quite extensive and expensive. (this is the world I live in, and drag my wallet into kicking and screaming)
 

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So I’m at the dealer today for some routine maintenance and started a conversation about lifts and any advice or recommendations based on issues he’s seen come in the shop.

He told me don’t lift your Wrangler or add bigger tires. It will change the geometry and stress the driveline causing lots of problems up to and including failed axels.

So I asked if they installed Mopar lifts and if so so do the same concerns exist. He said it was a factory lift designed to address concerns with the driveline and wouldn’t recommend any 3rd party lifts. Since I’m out of warranty (2013 JKUS) I asked if he’d seen any issues with the Teraflex 2.5 coil/shock lift I’m planning. He repeated his statement and said “Do it at your own risk”.

So my question to all with Teraflex and AEV lifts: have you experienced any driveline catastrophes? Is this just the dealer being cautious based on seeing too many failures from shoddy work?

Any add-on’s you would recommend in addition to the lift kit to reduce driveline stress?
Technically and legally speaking he is correct. By lifting your vehicle you are changing the geometry of the suspension and by installing bigger wheels you are adding stress to the axles. But I doubt any catastrophic event will occur to your drive-line. Some components lifespan might be shortened though, let say a factory driveshaft CV joint is designed to last 60K Miles and to break the next day your jeep is out of warranty, in case of a lift the driveshaft angle is changed and therefore the cv joint might break within the warranty period :)
 

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Once you start modding you’ll have to find a different dealership for your warranty work.
He is already out of warranty
 
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