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The wobble is bad. I am not much of a mechanic, but I know how to turn a wrench. I spoke with a mechanic and he said my dampener. When I spoke with someone at qtec, they told me all I would need was part# 16301.9001. They called it the Rubicon Express OE Replacement Steering Stabilizer. I know that the parts are universal, I just want to confirm this will be ok for an 07 X Unlimited.
Does anyone know of a better part or option for a more reliable fix? Ive seen skyjackers used in some vids I've seen. I feel like this is something I can fix on my own.. rather than have the dealership do it for $800 like they quoted me.

Thanks for any help.
 

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The best option you have is Planman's step-by-step process described in the link KJeeper provided above. The diagnosis is simple, systematic and it works. It will identify which joint is the problem. Start by having your tires dynamically balanced because they are often the trigger not necessarily the root cause of DW.

The proposed steering stabilizer will just mask the problem at best.
 

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My buddy bought a used '09 rubicon JKU and his stearing dampener when out within about 6 months of buying it. He said he would hit a certain spot on the highway and presto, death wobble. Had the deal change it out under warranty and back to normal.

I personally have seen alot of issue with people going offroading and not tightening their control arms at least every other time out. I tighten mine before and after I hit the trails. I figure that those are the suspension parts getting the most motion; especially with the sway bars disconnected. If the bolts get a little loose on the front control arms that this is going side to side really easily.
 

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My buddy bought a used '09 rubicon JKU and his stearing dampener when out within about 6 months of buying it. He said he would hit a certain spot on the highway and presto, death wobble. Had the deal change it out under warranty and back to normal. I personally have seen alot of issue with people going offroading and not tightening their control arms at least every other time out. I tighten mine before and after I hit the trails. I figure that those are the suspension parts getting the most motion; especially with the sway bars disconnected. If the bolts get a little loose on the front control arms that this is going side to side really easily.

The steering stabilizer in no way. is a cause for DW. Matter of fact .. A jeep should be able to drive without one. It's job is to dampen larger hits and take some stress off the steering joints/box.
What does happens a lot .. DW will cause the stabilizer to go bad. Then The Dealership will replace the stabilizer. the owner thinks it's gone but then returns.

DW is a bad track bar 99% of the time, This includes loose bolts, worn holes, bad bushings, or broken welds.

Loose CA's can contribute to DW (instigate) but not the main cause.
 

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I'll let ya guys know how much of it takes the beating(steering dampener).. My steering dampener went out and boom! Weld broke off the track bar, just ordered a new one and had it double welded.. Part should be in Monday, .. I have new tie rods and drag link ends etc. .. So we'll see, and wouldn't having new shocks help absorb some of the impact from the steering components and more towards the shocks and springs?
 

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I'll let ya guys know how much of it takes the beating(steering dampener).. My steering dampener went out and boom! Weld broke off the track bar, just ordered a new one and had it double welded.. Part should be in Monday, .. I have new tie rods and drag link ends etc. .. So we'll see, and wouldn't having new shocks help absorb some of the impact from the steering components and more towards the shocks and springs?
Reverse that. A broken track bar/weld will blow out the stabilizer.
Dealers will keep throwing new stabs at the problem not fixing the root cause. = track bar.
 

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I agree, .. It was funny cause when I changed my tie rods and stuff I was able to check that little shock and it was blown out, but hadn't broke the weld yet. The day I ordered it, is when I hit one little bump on my home, and it broke off :(.. Sigh .. It's ok.. I'm beefing it all up now, everything is stock as far as tires etc.. No lift , just aftermarket parts for OE replacements
 

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Steering stabilizers help control bumpsteer & in doing so aid in masking 'death wobble', as bumpsteer is usually the main initiator of 'death wobble'-mostly assisted by faulty/loose components or 'out-of-spec' mods (although occasionally a simple tire/wheel balance problem can initiate DW also).

The "cause" of death wobble is in the design/nature of steerable solid live axle suspensions, period..

The fact that the axle is 'solid' (not independent) means that whatever happens to one side is transmitted to the other. Couple this with a relatively short 'kingpin arc' (distance between upper & lower ball joints) in order to achieve a reasonable inclination (among other things) & your left with a 'tire scrub radius' not exactly conducive for decent road manners.

What all this means is; the 'tire scrub radius' (or portion of tire in contact with the road that is 'scrubbing'/not rotating while turning) causes the tire to resist (fight) the turn, so on a solid axle this 'resistance' is transmitted across the axle causing the same effect on the opposite tire, & so on & so on, until the frequency resonates into "Death Wobble" & the vehicle must be slowed/stopped to reduce/eliminate the resistance/frequency.

Of course as mentioned, loose suspension components are the main culprit initiating this unwanted reaction, with certainly the track bar & attachment points being high on the suspect list. And of course any movement away from parameters (ie-lift, wheel offsets, etc..) only aggravates the onset of symptoms into occurring earlier.

Make no mistake about it though, this is a 'design limitation' issue with this type of suspension & can not be totally 'cured', only managed..
Jeep Wranglers weren't built to win Lemans, & the Rubicon version is literally on the ragged edge between great 'solid axle' off-road performance & decent reliable roadability..

I can almost hear the screaming now "If the Manufacturers know what the problem is, why don't they fix it?" Mainly because the problem isn't theirs, it's mostly a condition of 'modded' vehicles-or vehicles with excessively worn parts (& they're in the vehicle repair business also!)..

Of course the only 'true fix' is an independent front suspension.. but who wants that??

Hope this helps...
 

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Steering stabilizers help control bumpsteer & in doing so aid in masking 'death wobble', as bumpsteer is usually the main initiator of 'death wobble'-mostly assisted by faulty/loose components or 'out-of-spec' mods (although occasionally a simple tire/wheel balance problem can initiate DW also). The "cause" of death wobble is in the design/nature of steerable solid live axle suspensions, period.. The fact that the axle is 'solid' (not independent) means that whatever happens to one side is transmitted to the other. Couple this with a relatively short 'kingpin arc' (distance between upper & lower ball joints) in order to achieve a reasonable inclination (among other things) & your left with a 'tire scrub radius' not exactly conducive for decent road manners. What all this means is; the 'tire scrub radius' (or portion of tire in contact with the road that is 'scrubbing'/not rotating while turning) causes the tire to resist (fight) the turn, so on a solid axle this 'resistance' is transmitted across the axle causing the same effect on the opposite tire, & so on & so on, until the frequency resonates into "Death Wobble" & the vehicle must be slowed/stopped to reduce/eliminate the resistance/frequency. Of course as mentioned, loose suspension components are the main culprit initiating this unwanted reaction, with certainly the track bar & attachment points being high on the suspect list. And of course any movement away from parameters (ie-lift, wheel offsets, etc..) only aggravates the onset of symptoms into occurring earlier. Make no mistake about it though, this is a 'design limitation' issue with this type of suspension & can not be totally 'cured', only managed.. Jeep Wranglers weren't built to win Lemans, & the Rubicon version is literally on the ragged edge between great 'solid axle' off-road performance & decent reliable roadability.. I can almost hear the screaming now "If the Manufacturers know what the problem is, why don't they fix it?" Mainly because the problem isn't theirs, it's mostly a condition of 'modded' vehicles-or vehicles with excessively worn parts (& they're in the vehicle repair business also!).. Of course the only 'true fix' is an independent front suspension.. but who wants that?? Hope this helps...
Awesome, this is good info to know, it's cool to know not just the average everyday jeep driver reads these forums but also professionals in the automotive industry as well.. Thank you for the helpful information :)
 

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Another large contributor (not cause) to 'Death Wobble' is unsprung weight..
By its very nature unsprung weight is difficult to manage, this is why in most racing applications unsprung weight is reduced as much as possible, in order to allow the suspension to better respond to (or 'manage') road conditions/irregularities.

Remember that when you lift those vehicles for more clearance..
Bigger tires, larger wheels, beefed up axles, all contribute to unsprung weight, making any shimmy/wobble that much more difficult for the suspension to manage.

All the reasons I've stated (& more) are why if you chose to mod these vehicles, you must be extra diligent with regard to maintenance.
'Mod" & maintain what you plan to use, or live with the consequences.
Too high-Too much for your needs, & you will be paying a price (one way or another) for something that has no use, & your 'fun' Jeep could quickly become a burden.

Most everything is a give & take, gain a little here-lose a little there..
If you want a more capable off-roader, you're gonna have to surrender some street manners, you simply can't get something for nothing..

It's really as simple as that...
 
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