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hello all, did an all wheel pad change the other day. First time, took about 2 hours. The bottom line is it is very easy to do for a basic at home mechanic :). The total job cost me about $120. There are dozens of videos on youtube for this. Some pointers:


  • if you have oem wheels, you do not need any fancy jacks, I've used a brick under my oem jack to get a bit of extra lift and also added a jack stand once up, just in case
  • if was a bit of a pain to remove the wheel nuts using the stock breaker, probably they over tightened them at the factory or dealership on delivery. I actually used an old paining metal broom handle I had in the garage to get extra leverage
  • wheels are heavy so I was careful to remove them not to break something in me :)
  • once off, it was easy, you actually need just a 15mm thin wrench and for the other 13mm side you can just use a ratchet set (which I think everyone has)
  • the biggest pain was removing the back pads. They have almost disintegrated. My car has 50k and just started squeaking a few days before the change. oem pads were not that great I guess. This was my first pad change. I got semi metallic NAPA for the back. The fronts were actually in good shape. so I wonder if the back wear out quicker due to rear drive. the oem clips were good so i reused them.
  • the bottom line is this is very easy to do if you take your time on a nice sunny day and i am no mechanic
  • second time will take an hour less i am guessing
  • i do have a rather big torque wrench to tighten the lug nuts back up
  • my expenses were $110 for the pad set and $4 for the C clamp to push the pistons back in
  • the piece of mind that the dealer did not f it up is priceless

 

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I just did a set of power stop brakes on mine. It is super easy. Just make sure you put the retaining clips for the pads on correctly. You will see how they line up if you look closely (ask me how I know) lol


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hello all, did an all wheel pad change the other day. First time, took about 2 hours. The bottom line is it is very easy to do for a basic at home mechanic :). The total job cost me about $120. There are dozens of videos on youtube for this. Some pointers:


  • if you have oem wheels, you do not need any fancy jacks, I've used a brick under my oem jack to get a bit of extra lift and also added a jack stand once up, just in case
  • if was a bit of a pain to remove the wheel nuts using the stock breaker, probably they over tightened them at the factory or dealership on delivery. I actually used an old paining metal broom handle I had in the garage to get extra leverage
  • wheels are heavy so I was careful to remove them not to break something in me :)
  • once off, it was easy, you actually need just a 15mm thin wrench and for the other 13mm side you can just use a ratchet set (which I think everyone has)
  • the biggest pain was removing the back pads. They have almost disintegrated. My car has 50k and just started squeaking a few days before the change. oem pads were not that great I guess. This was my first pad change. I got semi metallic NAPA for the back. The fronts were actually in good shape. so I wonder if the back wear out quicker due to rear drive. the oem clips were good so i reused them.
  • the bottom line is this is very easy to do if you take your time on a nice sunny day and i am no mechanic
  • second time will take an hour less i am guessing
  • i do have a rather big torque wrench to tighten the lug nuts back up
  • my expenses were $110 for the pad set and $4 for the C clamp to push the pistons back in
  • the piece of mind that the dealer did not f it up is priceless

Thanks for the information, I had always been told front brakes wear out fastest/first. Seems with some of the newer vehicles it's the rear that go first. Someone else told me their rear need to be replaced, their front was still good, this was on a non-Jeep. I don't remember what kind of car, I thought it was strange the rear went first. Probably because of the sophisticated anit-sway, non-slip & down hill decent systems, I guess?

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Do not use a brick or block under a jack or stand due to it braking and causing pain as the jeep lands on you. When you replace pads the rotors should be turned or replaced. When you compress the caliper to install the new pads open the bleeder so you don't force old and dirty fluid back into the system.
 

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Do not use a brick or block under a jack or stand due to it braking and causing pain as the jeep lands on you. When you replace pads the rotors should be turned or replaced. When you compress the caliper to install the new pads open the bleeder so you don't force old and dirty fluid back into the system.
Good advice on the bleeder; you can do a partial fluid change that way just by changing your pads. Masonry bad, solid wood and steel good.
 

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Do not use a brick or block under a jack or stand due to it braking and causing pain as the jeep lands on you. When you replace pads the rotors should be turned or replaced. When you compress the caliper to install the new pads open the bleeder so you don't force old and dirty fluid back into the system.
good advice on all of it. Just putting new pads on without turning or replacing rotors is likely to reduce braking ability and cause squealing brakes.
 
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