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Discussion Starter #1
In other threads I've mentioned that in the next couple of months I'll be having my JK regeared to 4.88s and eLockers added. I've got a 2.5" lift and 35s.

Another thing I'd like to do, while they're doing all that, is to replace the stock diff covers with something stronger and more durable. As most of you know there's about a million choices out there and all say they're the best.

So I'm turning to you guys, my favorite source of Jeep information, to give me food for thought and recommendations on what covers to have installed during the regear. This Jeep will only be used for trails/mud and not for rock crawling if that makes a difference. I'm guessing it would.

I suspect that whatever I decide on I should let the garage doing the work order the covers because they could get them less than I could order them online.

So what makes a diff cover something I should avoid, and what do I want to be sure and look for?
 

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There are plenty of options for diff covers. And I don't think I have seen a bad choice. But there are some differences between them.
We have ARB covers, the main thing I like about them is the fill hole is large in diameter and oriented so you pour oil down into it instead of having to fill it sideways. I also like the dip stick vs the others that have an over flow hole that may or may not be where you need it to be.
I also lean towards cast iron covers for their strength and rigidity.
Beyond that, there are differences in looks, and differences in price.
 

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I don't have ARB diff covers but the features might be a deal breaker for me next time. I have SOLID brand. Very, uhh... solid lol. No bells and whistles, but very beefy and may be the lowest priced covers with high quality imo.

The secret to refilling a diff with a more bulbous diff cover is to measure or keep track of how much gear oil you're putting in, before you start pouring it in. The larger interior volume will likely allow more oil and the fill hole may also be higher. If you can somehow eyeball/determine if the oil is filled just to the bottom horizontal plane of the axle (lowest part of the axle tube) then you're golden and don't need to worry about measuring before pouring etc. Don't forget the LubeLocker, LLC

No affiliation whatsoever btw.
 

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I researched this like crazy two months ago and kept coming back to the Poison Spyder covers which is what I went with. Did well in Moab last month and the install was easy. They seem to be the best combo for price and function.
 

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I did the Poison Spyder covers. I did some research and couldn't find anything negative about them. But why PS and not all the others? .....I like the looks and painting them gave me something to do.

 

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I saw a video a while back, which I’ll try and find, where a guy did an analysis of the design of diff covers and how it can affect lubrication. For me, it was enough to make me want a cover from a company that designs and builds differentials, lockers, etc. when the time is right.

Edit: I think this was it:
 
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I went with Motobilt. Pure beef

 

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Banks spent a year designing and researching how shape and temp affect fluid dynamics in dif covers. This is a longer video and there are several others in this series, but at the end of the day, a shape similar to OEM is best for JK/JKU Dana differentials according to Gale Banks. If you dont know who Gale Banks is, he is the Carroll Shelby of diesel.

 
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You definitely want covers that mimic the shape of the original factory covers. As other have stated, the shape is very important for proper lubrication of the pinion bearings.

The other important thing is the level of the fill plug. The fill plug location on a front D44 is different than a rear D44, so you need to make sure that your cover accounts for this or figure out some way to get the diff filled to the proper level.

If you don't want to have to worry about shape or fill level, keep the original covers and install a diff guard. I use the Warn version along with a LubeLocker gasket. It is extremely well built and has taken a beating:
Warn D44:
Mopar D44:
 

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I just sprayed mine flat black.

Make sure to inspect your gears when you have the cover off. My upper and lower spider gears in the rear were in pieces at 43k miles. My $200 diff cover upgrade ended up costing $1500 as I replaced them with an Eaton LSD.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Make sure to inspect your gears when you have the cover off.
As mentioned in my first post, this will be a result of having the gears replaced, so luckily it doesn't matter if the existing gears are worn a bit. :)
 
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I have use PS covers for years over hundreds of thousands of miles with no issues.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Red ARB's front and rear with Lubelockers, perfect.
 

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I personally have never had, nor needed, beefier diff covers. I have an AEV rear diff slider and a Rancho one up front, but going all the way back to 1995, I’ve never needed one.

But to stay on topic, one thing not mentioned that I thought was an issue in the past was if the diff cover cleared the track bar when the suspension is cycled. Just something to keep in mind.
 

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07 JK Rubi, 4" lift, Nitto 37's, re-geared with Yukon 5.13
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I went with the Yukon covers as I like the dual drain plugs and the magnetic to pick up particles.
 
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