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Discussion Starter #1
Over the past few weekends I have been slowly working on an onboard air system for my JK. Although my JK is mostly stock (for now) I know I will want an onboard air system for refilling my future 37's and potentially locking an air locker.

I had a Hadley 12v compressor left over from another project, and one of those mini propane tanks (my guess is roughly 2gal) that had an oldschool valve on it and no local place would fill it. I had been envying those Vair systems for a while, but they are ~$350 and I just couldnt justify it when I already had most of the components to make a system.

Here is the compressor I had:

cmp.JPG

I didnt really like the way that they recommend mounting the vair systems: compressor near the master brake cyl and the tank right around the radiator. Although it seems to work fine for most people, I wanted to mount the compressor somewhere that would stay mostly clean and dry. I got poking around and found a pretty neat place to put the compressor: inside/behind the passenger side rear tail light. There is a tremendous amount of room in there! I cant believe Jeep didnt use that space somehow. It is mostly sealed off from the elements and totally out of the way of anything else on my jeep. The only downside is that while there is a lot of space in there, it is quite difficult to get your hands in there to do anything.

taillight off.JPG

After what seemed like a very long time (the ~10 degree ohio winter wasnt helping) I got the compressor mounted nicely inside that cavity.

Cmp mtd.JPG

Next up was the tank. After looking around at everything underneath my jeep I figured I could weld up some brackets and mount it directly in front of the charcoal filter. I measured it, and if I mounted it up as high as it would go, then the bottom of the tank would still be above the skidplates - so I figured it would be a safe place to mount it.

After a few quick and dirty brackets, a coat of paint, and lots of dirt falling in my eyes, I had the tank mounted.

tank.JPG

I had a pressure switch too, to shut off the compressor at 120psi, and I mounted that in the taillight with the compressor. Plumbing the air line was easy enough, I used 1/4" semi rigid plastic air line and ran one fitting up to the hood, and the other to the rear of the jeep. For electric, I got the rugged ridge A pillar switch panel - I HIGHLY recommend this switch panel, it fits very well and the color and texture match the interior perfectly. It looks like it came from the dealer that way.

All in, I am very happy with this project. It took me a while to complete, but now I just flip a switch and have a pretty reasonable amount of air with quick connects at the front and back of the Jeep.

To anyone else looking to get an onboard air system, I would highly recommend considering mounting it inside the rear taillight
 

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Over the past few weekends I have been slowly working on an onboard air system for my JK. Although my JK is mostly stock (for now) I know I will want an onboard air system for refilling my future 37's and potentially locking an air locker.

I had a Hadley 12v compressor left over from another project, and one of those mini propane tanks (my guess is roughly 2gal) that had an oldschool valve on it and no local place would fill it. I had been envying those Vair systems for a while, but they are ~$350 and I just couldnt justify it when I already had most of the components to make a system.

Here is the compressor I had:

View attachment 1866090

I didnt really like the way that they recommend mounting the vair systems: compressor near the master brake cyl and the tank right around the radiator. Although it seems to work fine for most people, I wanted to mount the compressor somewhere that would stay mostly clean and dry. I got poking around and found a pretty neat place to put the compressor: inside/behind the passenger side rear tail light. There is a tremendous amount of room in there! I cant believe Jeep didnt use that space somehow. It is mostly sealed off from the elements and totally out of the way of anything else on my jeep. The only downside is that while there is a lot of space in there, it is quite difficult to get your hands in there to do anything.

View attachment 1866098

After what seemed like a very long time (the ~10 degree ohio winter wasnt helping) I got the compressor mounted nicely inside that cavity.

View attachment 1866082

Next up was the tank. After looking around at everything underneath my jeep I figured I could weld up some brackets and mount it directly in front of the charcoal filter. I measured it, and if I mounted it up as high as it would go, then the bottom of the tank would still be above the skidplates - so I figured it would be a safe place to mount it.

After a few quick and dirty brackets, a coat of paint, and lots of dirt falling in my eyes, I had the tank mounted.

View attachment 1866106

I had a pressure switch too, to shut off the compressor at 120psi, and I mounted that in the taillight with the compressor. Plumbing the air line was easy enough, I used 1/4" semi rigid plastic air line and ran one fitting up to the hood, and the other to the rear of the jeep. For electric, I got the rugged ridge A pillar switch panel - I HIGHLY recommend this switch panel, it fits very well and the color and texture match the interior perfectly. It looks like it came from the dealer that way.

All in, I am very happy with this project. It took me a while to complete, but now I just flip a switch and have a pretty reasonable amount of air with quick connects at the front and back of the Jeep.

To anyone else looking to get an onboard air system, I would highly recommend considering mounting it inside the rear taillight
That's a really clean set up! I like that location for the compressor. Can you hear it in the cab? I have mine on my fire wall (TJ) and it's noisy when it runs. Luckily it doesn't have to flip on too often when driving.

Great set up!

-Ryan
 

Premium Member
Joined
169 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
That's a really clean set up! I like that location for the compressor. Can you hear it in the cab? I have mine on my fire wall (TJ) and it's noisy when it runs. Luckily it doesn't have to flip on too often when driving.

Great set up!

-Ryan
Thank you! Yes you can hear it in the cab, but honestly it isnt as loud as I thought it would be. With the radio on, you might not even notice.

thats a good idea!
Why thank you :)

Very clever. Deserving of many free beers.
Thanks! Cheers! :beerdrinking:



If anyone has any detailed questions feel free to ask!
 

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It doesn't worry you having the tank that close to the exhaust? (Thinking heat) also does that older tank have a rupture disk or pressure relief valve?
 

Premium Member
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Discussion Starter #7
No im not too concerned about having it near the exhaust considering it is just compressed air in there. If it were propane it would be a different story :)

I dont plan on routinely keeping the tank pressurized, so if it gets hot it can just build a little pressure, no biggie. Good thought about the pressure relief, the answer is no, it doesnt have one, but the plastic tube I used to connect everything (and the little plastic T fittings) would certainly be the weakest link in the system, so if the pressure gets too high, ill just blow a fitting which isnt that big of a deal to me. It is definitely a good idea though, it would be easy enough to just add one inline somewhere. Maybe ill install one when it gets a little warmer :)
 

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Pretty genius place to mount the compressor......I have been wanting to build my own as well, have a lot of parts and a couple of small tanks capable of handling the air pressure. I have been trying to figure out where to mount it, but there is not much room under the hood of the 2015. Was thinking about under the passenger fron seat but I like this better.

We use a viair compressor on the cancer treatment system I work on. The compressors are 24 volt, so pretty useless on the jeep, but we have it in a rack mounted system that has a tank, with all sort of pressure switches, regulators and valves. The compressors fail after about a year (of constant use), and we swap out the whole cabinet, so I have a lot of parts.
 
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