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Saw some comments about the nylon locknuts galling when you try to remove them, you should make sure the exposed threads are clean before you try to remove it and also you should put some WD40 on the exposed threads to keep it from galling.

If you have ever worked with stainless bolts and stainless nylock nuts you even have to add WD40 even when you install it and for sure to remove it to keep it from galling.

.
I've worked extensively with stainless fasteners in the marine environment, and have never experienced any galling or corrosion between stainless bolts and nuts, including nylock nuts. Between stainless and zinc, galling for sure., but not between quality stainless fasteners.

Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk
 

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I've worked extensively with stainless fasteners in the marine environment, and have never experienced any galling or corrosion between stainless bolts and nuts, including nylock nuts. Between stainless and zinc, galling for sure., but not between quality stainless fasteners.

Sent from my SM-G935U using Tapatalk
Stainless on stainless can definitely gall. Engineers select hardware to minimize the chance of it happening.
 

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So I'm only looking to do the lcas at this time and I've pieced together some hardware. I just want to be sure I'm getting the proper parts. If any body would care to take a look at the screenshot of my cart, I would be mucho appreciative. Thanks @sined240 for the tip on Albany County Fasteners.
 

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So I'm only looking to do the lcas at this time and I've pieced together some hardware. I just want to be sure I'm getting the proper parts. If any body would care to take a look at the screenshot of my cart, I would be mucho appreciative. Thanks @sined240 for the tip on Albany County Fasteners.
Looks Good!
 

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I just upgraded my CA bolts to grade 8 bolts and...uh it feels exactly the same. In fact someone made the suggestion to upgrade the bolts to remedy this freakin' crazy binding noise I am getting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B3zF7Tp06bc and the sound is still there.

So from a personal experience, i'd say upgrading the bolts will just give you the peace of mind that you have new hardware under there :)
 

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There is a whole discussion about this in various forums. With that in mind, I am in the opposite opinion, I prefer Nylock or Nylon lock nuts for suspension components with two caveats, 1. Do not use in area subjected to heat more than 200-250 degree F and 2. Do not reuse too often, I would use it no more than 2-3 times and buy new nuts.

The Stover or Distorted thread nuts damage the threads as it is torqued and while it is good and has slightly better vibrational resistance, this requires that the bolt and nut be replaced after a couple of uses. This is good if you will torque once and basically forget it. People messing with their suspension and changing control arms and adjusting should be checking that the bolt threads aren't too worn. Also known to cause galling and removal is very difficult if threads damaged and corrosion has set in.
^^^This this this!!!

I am going over my whole suspension dealing with death wobble issues, despite getting a bolt upgrade kit. And guess what one of the things I found was? Not enough clamping force partially due to my bolt threads being demolished by these lock nuts in the kit after tweaking things a number of times over 3 years.
 

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Has anyone seen this new bolt upgrade kit MetalCloak came out with? Does anyone have experience with it yet?

https://www.metalcloak.com/JK-Wrangler-Bolt-and-Hardware-Upgrade-Kit-p/7214.

“The Metalcloak Jeep JK Wrangler Suspension (Control Arm & Track Bar) Replacement Hardware Kit is a 70 piece kit that includes:
16 Grade 8 Bolts, 30 Washers, 14 Nuts & 2 Flag Nuts for JK Control Arms
4 Grade-8 Bolts & Nuts for Front & Rear Track Bars
Truly the most complete kit on the market to replace your old, worn out, Jeep JK Wrangler hardware.”

The grade looks good but they don’t really give the specific info on the actual type of bolts and nuts provided so that’s why I’m wondering if anyone has tried it.

I’m wondering if it’s up to par with all of the info expressed on this thread. I’m currently searching for a kit (or gathering info to compile my own parts) for when I order my 3.5 lift.
 

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I picked up a rig with the AEV 3.5 DS kit with about 48k on it and I’m pretty sure nothing additionally bolt
wise was done. I’m planning on getting the Northridge kit but wanted to make sure I wasn’t buying more than I needed or find I might need more. The price looks like a good deal even if I get extras.
 

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I bought the bolt kits for my JK and the wife’s JKU. After installing the front TB bolts my steering wheel was of to right about 10 degrees. Took a turn of the DL to correct. Thought it odd on the JKU but a few months later the JK did the same thing. After the TB bolts were changed. Anyone else see this?
 

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I have a 2-post lift in the garage, and I'll be doing the bolt swap plus a TF 2"/1" spacer leveling kit this weekend. Am I correct to assume it's OK to get the track bar bolts started on the ground so they're located correctly, but put it in the air to finish torquing it down while I do the leveling kit?
 

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I have a 2-post lift in the garage, and I'll be doing the bolt swap plus a TF 2"/1" spacer leveling kit this weekend. Am I correct to assume it's OK to get the track bar bolts started on the ground so they're located correctly, but put it in the air to finish torquing it down while I do the leveling kit?
You can get the bolts started in the air or on the ground BUT Don't fully tighten any of the bolts trough the Track bar or control arms until the vehicle is sitting on the ground with the weight on the suspension at ride height

All track bars and control arms bolts torqued to 125 ftlb's except the front upper control arms which are 75 ftlb's
 

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Do You Really Need Grade 8, 9/16", Fine Thread, Partially Threaded Replacement Bolts?

Do You Really Need Grade 8, 9/16", Fine Thread, Partially Threaded Replacement Bolts?


If you have properly maintained your jeep and/or will continue to do so in the future, the answer is "no, you do not need them."

The stock, smaller-than-bracket-bolt-hole-and-bushing-sleeve bolts only become a problem when insufficiently torqued because the smaller size permits more violent oscillations within the bracket and bushings. This results in more violent oscillations commonly referred to as Death Wobble, and the extra play results in greater damage to brackets, bushings, welds, and other components.

Again, the undersized stock bolts are only a problem when they are not sufficiently torqued and maintained--the greater play when not sufficiently torqued is the common source of Death Wobble.

The bolts themselves are not a source of Death Wobble.


Now, many people who have done the swap have experienced improvement in tightness and handling of their front end and suspension. For some, they experienced Death Wobble before the swap, and it went away after the swap.

People who have experienced improvement from the swap to 9/16" Grade 8, partially threaded, fine thread bolts, had this experience because of the byproducts of the swap.

These byproducts may include one or more of:


  • the swap resulted in greater attention to torque and maintenance
  • the swap resulted in the owner purchasing a quality and calibrated torque wrench, learning how to properly use it, and becoming more familiar with how their jeep works
  • fine thread, partially threaded bolts stretch slightly less than the stock bolts, and as a result, they hold torque better (but this still does not negate the need for maintenance)
  • the swap resulted in pre-loaded/binding/twisted rubber bushings returning to a neutral position between the brackets at ride height (for people who did/had incorrect installs where bolts were not loosened for the installs)
  • for people who had not sufficiently maintained their jeep with stock bolts and bracket holes were egged out, the larger bolts helped center the bushing bolt sleeves over the holes for a more even clamping of that bushing bolt/crush sleeve force between the brackets
For people who properly maintain their jeep, don't have egged/wallowed bracket holes, and who don't have pre-loaded rubber bushings, the byproducts of the bolt swap don't really matter, and they do not experience any real difference from the swap.


But, what about using partially threaded bolts instead of fully threaded bolts in brackets and bolt sleeves?

Well, it doesn't matter if bushing bolt sleeves get scored by stock bolts. The scoring is only a concern if it is the result of looseness from lack of torque/clamping force. None of the joints or bushings corresponding to the bolts that are swapped are supposed to have the sleeves rotate on the axis of the bolts. The bolt sleees are to remain static between the brackets, and the suspension articulation is allowed by either the twisting of the rubber bushing, or the rotation of a joint.

The clamping force of 125 ft lbs of a stock bolt, with the bushing bolt sleeves set at a full and even contact surface on the inside of the bracket, is sufficient to prevent movement within the brackets.

If the contact surface inside the bracket is damaged, if the contact surface is uneven because the holes have been egged/ovaled out, etc., then the stock bolts may not be sufficient to center the bolt sleeve over the bracket holes.

A larger diameter bolt may be needed to center the bolt sleeve/bushing over the hole in order to get an even surface inside the bracket.

If the holes are severely egged out, the larger diameter bolt may be insufficient, and either washers or plate may need to be welded to the bracket to provide an even surface for the bolts, washers, and bushing bolt sleeves to hold the clamping force sufficient to prevent movement at 125 ft lbs.


Now, that being said, I still suggest that people consider doing the swap of at least the front trackbar bolts. Why? Because the cost is relatively small, and the byproducts can be helpful. But, it is more out of preference than a requirement.


Should you spend the equivalent of about 1/2 tank of gas and spend $40 to do a swap all of your front and your rear track bar bolts, and all of your lower control arm bolts?

Well, if you think that the byproducts of the swap are worth it, then go for it. Most of us waste $40 on things, recreation or entertainment of less value--on a regular basis.

Many of us change our engine oil more frequently than is needed and easily overspend $40+ more annually on oil and filters. So, what? It's a preference. It is a "conspiracy" by the oil companies and lube centers to tell us that we need to change our oil every 3k miles or 3 months instead of at the intervals recommended by the manufacturer in our owners manuals? Is it a "conspiracy" that some recommend synthetic oil? Maybe. Who cares? Some people with an axe to grind, maybe care. For the rest of us, it is a choice and a preference. Northridge4x4 and Synergy selling bolt kits is no conspiracy.


Now, swapping just the front trackbar bolts might cost you $6, plus or minus. They will hold torque better. The front trackbar bolts are the most critical with relation to steering and front end wobbles.


I wanted to post this thread to clarify my posts in my Diganosing Death Wobble threads.

In those threads, I wrote (emphasis added):




I swapped the trackbar bolts in our 3 JKs long before Northridge4x4 introduced their 9/16" bolt kit or before Synergy started selling volumes of their kit. Northridge4x4 sent me 3 full bolt kits to swap into our 3 JKs--at no charge. I've spent thousands upon thousands of dollars with Northridge4x4 and referred hoards of customers to them. I have recently discovered that there are a few unnamed bullies :9lame: on another forum :crazy: who actually are upset that Northridge4x4 sent me bolt kits for my 3 JKs (outfitted with purchases from Northridge4x4), and they are upset that Northridge4x4 referenced the video I had already made about swapping the front trackbar bolts. Really? Northridge4x4 threw in free bolt kits for people who purchased suspension kits from them for a long time after their introduction. Some people just need to grow up, "shut up and wheel," and stop acting like schoolyard bullies.:flipoff:



The smaller stock bolts are less of a design flaw than the failure of Chrysler to include torquing suspension bolts as part of a new car Pre-Delivery Inspection at the dealership, and to include torquing at least the front trackbar bolts at every oil change interval or two as part of normal maintenance.

Bolts stretch, metal fatigues, and suspension cycling/vibrations results in bolts losing torque. This is a bad combination with the 14 mm bolts in an up to 15+mm stock bracket hole and trackbar bushing bolt sleeve.

So, do you absolutely need to swap your bolts to 9/16"? No.

Should you to the swap? If you want the byproducts of the swap, and/or have some damage from egged/ovaled holes, then you probably should where the problem exists. If you want the peace of mind knowing that your front trackbar bolts will hold torque better and provide a snugger fit, then it is worth swapping the trackbar bolts.

Tech tip: Use a paint pen and draw a line across the bolt onto the mount for a visual.
I hate to throw a rock into the pond on this 14mm vs 9/16" issue, but I have some disagreement re: retaining the 14mm standard (fully threaded) bolts on lifted rigs. In my experience they may work ok on stock rigs with their limited wheel travel, but throw the increased wheel travel of a lifted rig at them with significant increases in wheel travel and the clevite bushings on control arms & track bars start to move, no matter what torque is applied. When they do, the threads of the 14mm standard bolts grind on the bushings, and the bracket holes. Using 9/16" shank bolts eliminates the excess clearance between the bracket & bushing holes and the bolt, and the shanks prevent abrasion of the bushings & brackets. On control arms with Johnny Joints on both ends there is less chance of damage to the bushing, but the bracket holes still can be egged out by the bolt threads when they shift under stress. With control arms using clevite joints at the frame, the need for the 9/16" shank bolts is more acute. Track bar brackets and bushings in particular benefit from the conversion to 9/16" shank bolts. Many cases of loose steering and death wobble have been traced to the 14mm standard bolts wallowing out the bracket & bushing holes, allowing the track bars to shift. These issues can arise even when the stock bolts are torqued to the specified 125ft lbs, and again it's simply due to the added stresses the additional wheel travel of lifted rigs exert on the bolts, brackets and bushings. Converting to 9/16" grade 8 shank bolts is an inexpensive upgrade that prevents this, it really does pay off.
I was starting to have the dreaded death wooble
Do You Really Need Grade 8, 9/16", Fine Thread, Partially Threaded Replacement Bolts?

Do You Really Need Grade 8, 9/16", Fine Thread, Partially Threaded Replacement Bolts?


If you have properly maintained your jeep and/or will continue to do so in the future, the answer is "no, you do not need them."

The stock, smaller-than-bracket-bolt-hole-and-bushing-sleeve bolts only become a problem when insufficiently torqued because the smaller size permits more violent oscillations within the bracket and bushings. This results in more violent oscillations commonly referred to as Death Wobble, and the extra play results in greater damage to brackets, bushings, welds, and other components.

Again, the undersized stock bolts are only a problem when they are not sufficiently torqued and maintained--the greater play when not sufficiently torqued is the common source of Death Wobble.

The bolts themselves are not a source of Death Wobble.


Now, many people who have done the swap have experienced improvement in tightness and handling of their front end and suspension. For some, they experienced Death Wobble before the swap, and it went away after the swap.

People who have experienced improvement from the swap to 9/16" Grade 8, partially threaded, fine thread bolts, had this experience because of the byproducts of the swap.

These byproducts may include one or more of:


  • the swap resulted in greater attention to torque and maintenance
  • the swap resulted in the owner purchasing a quality and calibrated torque wrench, learning how to properly use it, and becoming more familiar with how their jeep works
  • fine thread, partially threaded bolts stretch slightly less than the stock bolts, and as a result, they hold torque better (but this still does not negate the need for maintenance)
  • the swap resulted in pre-loaded/binding/twisted rubber bushings returning to a neutral position between the brackets at ride height (for people who did/had incorrect installs where bolts were not loosened for the installs)
  • for people who had not sufficiently maintained their jeep with stock bolts and bracket holes were egged out, the larger bolts helped center the bushing bolt sleeves over the holes for a more even clamping of that bushing bolt/crush sleeve force between the brackets
For people who properly maintain their jeep, don't have egged/wallowed bracket holes, and who don't have pre-loaded rubber bushings, the byproducts of the bolt swap don't really matter, and they do not experience any real difference from the swap.


But, what about using partially threaded bolts instead of fully threaded bolts in brackets and bolt sleeves?

Well, it doesn't matter if bushing bolt sleeves get scored by stock bolts. The scoring is only a concern if it is the result of looseness from lack of torque/clamping force. None of the joints or bushings corresponding to the bolts that are swapped are supposed to have the sleeves rotate on the axis of the bolts. The bolt sleees are to remain static between the brackets, and the suspension articulation is allowed by either the twisting of the rubber bushing, or the rotation of a joint.

The clamping force of 125 ft lbs of a stock bolt, with the bushing bolt sleeves set at a full and even contact surface on the inside of the bracket, is sufficient to prevent movement within the brackets.

If the contact surface inside the bracket is damaged, if the contact surface is uneven because the holes have been egged/ovaled out, etc., then the stock bolts may not be sufficient to center the bolt sleeve over the bracket holes.

A larger diameter bolt may be needed to center the bolt sleeve/bushing over the hole in order to get an even surface inside the bracket.

If the holes are severely egged out, the larger diameter bolt may be insufficient, and either washers or plate may need to be welded to the bracket to provide an even surface for the bolts, washers, and bushing bolt sleeves to hold the clamping force sufficient to prevent movement at 125 ft lbs.


Now, that being said, I still suggest that people consider doing the swap of at least the front trackbar bolts. Why? Because the cost is relatively small, and the byproducts can be helpful. But, it is more out of preference than a requirement.


Should you spend the equivalent of about 1/2 tank of gas and spend $40 to do a swap all of your front and your rear track bar bolts, and all of your lower control arm bolts?

Well, if you think that the byproducts of the swap are worth it, then go for it. Most of us waste $40 on things, recreation or entertainment of less value--on a regular basis.

Many of us change our engine oil more frequently than is needed and easily overspend $40+ more annually on oil and filters. So, what? It's a preference. It is a "conspiracy" by the oil companies and lube centers to tell us that we need to change our oil every 3k miles or 3 months instead of at the intervals recommended by the manufacturer in our owners manuals? Is it a "conspiracy" that some recommend synthetic oil? Maybe. Who cares? Some people with an axe to grind, maybe care. For the rest of us, it is a choice and a preference. Northridge4x4 and Synergy selling bolt kits is no conspiracy.


Now, swapping just the front trackbar bolts might cost you $6, plus or minus. They will hold torque better. The front trackbar bolts are the most critical with relation to steering and front end wobbles.


I wanted to post this thread to clarify my posts in my Diganosing Death Wobble threads.

In those threads, I wrote (emphasis added):




I swapped the trackbar bolts in our 3 JKs long before Northridge4x4 introduced their 9/16" bolt kit or before Synergy started selling volumes of their kit. Northridge4x4 sent me 3 full bolt kits to swap into our 3 JKs--at no charge. I've spent thousands upon thousands of dollars with Northridge4x4 and referred hoards of customers to them. I have recently discovered that there are a few unnamed bullies :9lame: on another forum :crazy: who actually are upset that Northridge4x4 sent me bolt kits for my 3 JKs (outfitted with purchases from Northridge4x4), and they are upset that Northridge4x4 referenced the video I had already made about swapping the front trackbar bolts. Really? Northridge4x4 threw in free bolt kits for people who purchased suspension kits from them for a long time after their introduction. Some people just need to grow up, "shut up and wheel," and stop acting like schoolyard bullies.:flipoff:



The smaller stock bolts are less of a design flaw than the failure of Chrysler to include torquing suspension bolts as part of a new car Pre-Delivery Inspection at the dealership, and to include torquing at least the front trackbar bolts at every oil change interval or two as part of normal maintenance.

Bolts stretch, metal fatigues, and suspension cycling/vibrations results in bolts losing torque. This is a bad combination with the 14 mm bolts in an up to 15+mm stock bracket hole and trackbar bushing bolt sleeve.

So, do you absolutely need to swap your bolts to 9/16"? No.

Should you to the swap? If you want the byproducts of the swap, and/or have some damage from egged/ovaled holes, then you probably should where the problem exists. If you want the peace of mind knowing that your front trackbar bolts will hold torque better and provide a snugger fit, then it is worth swapping the trackbar bolts.

Tech tip: Use a paint pen and draw a line across the bolt onto the mount for a visual.
I for one was starting to have the dreaded death
Do You Really Need Grade 8, 9/16", Fine Thread, Partially Threaded Replacement Bolts?

Do You Really Need Grade 8, 9/16", Fine Thread, Partially Threaded Replacement Bolts?


If you have properly maintained your jeep and/or will continue to do so in the future, the answer is "no, you do not need them."

The stock, smaller-than-bracket-bolt-hole-and-bushing-sleeve bolts only become a problem when insufficiently torqued because the smaller size permits more violent oscillations within the bracket and bushings. This results in more violent oscillations commonly referred to as Death Wobble, and the extra play results in greater damage to brackets, bushings, welds, and other components.

Again, the undersized stock bolts are only a problem when they are not sufficiently torqued and maintained--the greater play when not sufficiently torqued is the common source of Death Wobble.

The bolts themselves are not a source of Death Wobble.


Now, many people who have done the swap have experienced improvement in tightness and handling of their front end and suspension. For some, they experienced Death Wobble before the swap, and it went away after the swap.

People who have experienced improvement from the swap to 9/16" Grade 8, partially threaded, fine thread bolts, had this experience because of the byproducts of the swap.

These byproducts may include one or more of:


  • the swap resulted in greater attention to torque and maintenance
  • the swap resulted in the owner purchasing a quality and calibrated torque wrench, learning how to properly use it, and becoming more familiar with how their jeep works
  • fine thread, partially threaded bolts stretch slightly less than the stock bolts, and as a result, they hold torque better (but this still does not negate the need for maintenance)
  • the swap resulted in pre-loaded/binding/twisted rubber bushings returning to a neutral position between the brackets at ride height (for people who did/had incorrect installs where bolts were not loosened for the installs)
  • for people who had not sufficiently maintained their jeep with stock bolts and bracket holes were egged out, the larger bolts helped center the bushing bolt sleeves over the holes for a more even clamping of that bushing bolt/crush sleeve force between the brackets
For people who properly maintain their jeep, don't have egged/wallowed bracket holes, and who don't have pre-loaded rubber bushings, the byproducts of the bolt swap don't really matter, and they do not experience any real difference from the swap.


But, what about using partially threaded bolts instead of fully threaded bolts in brackets and bolt sleeves?

Well, it doesn't matter if bushing bolt sleeves get scored by stock bolts. The scoring is only a concern if it is the result of looseness from lack of torque/clamping force. None of the joints or bushings corresponding to the bolts that are swapped are supposed to have the sleeves rotate on the axis of the bolts. The bolt sleees are to remain static between the brackets, and the suspension articulation is allowed by either the twisting of the rubber bushing, or the rotation of a joint.

The clamping force of 125 ft lbs of a stock bolt, with the bushing bolt sleeves set at a full and even contact surface on the inside of the bracket, is sufficient to prevent movement within the brackets.

If the contact surface inside the bracket is damaged, if the contact surface is uneven because the holes have been egged/ovaled out, etc., then the stock bolts may not be sufficient to center the bolt sleeve over the bracket holes.

A larger diameter bolt may be needed to center the bolt sleeve/bushing over the hole in order to get an even surface inside the bracket.

If the holes are severely egged out, the larger diameter bolt may be insufficient, and either washers or plate may need to be welded to the bracket to provide an even surface for the bolts, washers, and bushing bolt sleeves to hold the clamping force sufficient to prevent movement at 125 ft lbs.


Now, that being said, I still suggest that people consider doing the swap of at least the front trackbar bolts. Why? Because the cost is relatively small, and the byproducts can be helpful. But, it is more out of preference than a requirement.


Should you spend the equivalent of about 1/2 tank of gas and spend $40 to do a swap all of your front and your rear track bar bolts, and all of your lower control arm bolts?

Well, if you think that the byproducts of the swap are worth it, then go for it. Most of us waste $40 on things, recreation or entertainment of less value--on a regular basis.

Many of us change our engine oil more frequently than is needed and easily overspend $40+ more annually on oil and filters. So, what? It's a preference. It is a "conspiracy" by the oil companies and lube centers to tell us that we need to change our oil every 3k miles or 3 months instead of at the intervals recommended by the manufacturer in our owners manuals? Is it a "conspiracy" that some recommend synthetic oil? Maybe. Who cares? Some people with an axe to grind, maybe care. For the rest of us, it is a choice and a preference. Northridge4x4 and Synergy selling bolt kits is no conspiracy.


Now, swapping just the front trackbar bolts might cost you $6, plus or minus. They will hold torque better. The front trackbar bolts are the most critical with relation to steering and front end wobbles.


I wanted to post this thread to clarify my posts in my Diganosing Death Wobble threads.

In those threads, I wrote (emphasis added):




I swapped the trackbar bolts in our 3 JKs long before Northridge4x4 introduced their 9/16" bolt kit or before Synergy started selling volumes of their kit. Northridge4x4 sent me 3 full bolt kits to swap into our 3 JKs--at no charge. I've spent thousands upon thousands of dollars with Northridge4x4 and referred hoards of customers to them. I have recently discovered that there are a few unnamed bullies :9lame: on another forum :crazy: who actually are upset that Northridge4x4 sent me bolt kits for my 3 JKs (outfitted with purchases from Northridge4x4), and they are upset that Northridge4x4 referenced the video I had already made about swapping the front trackbar bolts. Really? Northridge4x4 threw in free bolt kits for people who purchased suspension kits from them for a long time after their introduction. Some people just need to grow up, "shut up and wheel," and stop acting like schoolyard bullies.:flipoff:



The smaller stock bolts are less of a design flaw than the failure of Chrysler to include torquing suspension bolts as part of a new car Pre-Delivery Inspection at the dealership, and to include torquing at least the front trackbar bolts at every oil change interval or two as part of normal maintenance.

Bolts stretch, metal fatigues, and suspension cycling/vibrations results in bolts losing torque. This is a bad combination with the 14 mm bolts in an up to 15+mm stock bracket hole and trackbar bushing bolt sleeve.

So, do you absolutely need to swap your bolts to 9/16"? No.

Should you to the swap? If you want the byproducts of the swap, and/or have some damage from egged/ovaled holes, then you probably should where the problem exists. If you want the peace of mind knowing that your front trackbar bolts will hold torque better and provide a snugger fit, then it is worth swapping the trackbar bolts.

Tech tip: Use a paint pen and draw a line across the bolt onto the mount for a visual.
I for one was starting to get the death wobble .So I replaced both track bars and at the same time added 9/16 hard ware for the price it seems cheap after all with track bars the hardware is not included bottom line wobble gone
 

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In my experience with a lifted, trail driven rig, the stock torque of 125 ft lbs, is NOT enough to prevent the stock, fully threaded 14mm bolts from shifting under loads and wallowing out the bracket holes. Once the damage is done it just gets worse. At a minimum, a 9/16" shanked bolt will at least reduce the progressive bracket wear. Jks have been around for 14 years now, there are plenty of real world examples to prove the point. Virtually none of the aftermarket track bar kits I've installed recommend using the factory bolts.
 
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