Jeep Wrangler Forum banner

Which one?

  • Dolly

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Flat Tow

    Votes: 4 36.4%
  • Trailer

    Votes: 7 63.6%

  • Total voters
    11
1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone,

I am starting to dig into the process of getting my jeep from my home to where I am now living for work. I left the jeep home when I moved and just took my tacoma with me. I am now looking into getting the jeep here too. More specifically I am looking at 1,100 miles from CT to Alabama. I've done a bunch of research and read up on the forums, however it does not seem anyone has much of a consensus. My options are a tow dolly, flat tow, or rent a uhaul trailer. My tacoma is a 2012 4.0 V6 with the tow package. Max rating is around 6,400lbs. The jeep is a 99 sport 4.0 I6 5 speed. Right now I am leaning towards flat towing with the drive shafts disconnected. I have some experience with a dolly and I don't particularly want to mess with one. Trailering is probably:)confused:) the safest but I would be very close to maxed out. Shipping is pretty steep at over $1000. Trailer rental was about $600.
Thanks in advance, sorry if this is just beating a dead horse.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,392 Posts
I've done all 3 options behind my sierra! Id do the uhaul trailer. That trailer would be the easiest to load, best brakes, and most comfortable behind the taco.

Ive flat towed my tj behind my truck without any additional brakes(not legally required here) and a magnetic light kit. It was fine but bear in mind my truck is significantly heavier than a taco. There is no tongue weight with a flat tow set up so it is a bit weird. You also don't have to disconnect the drive shaft, just pop the t-case in neutral. One thing to note is you can't back up a toad(vehicle being flat towed) you have to disconnect it then drive it separately.

The dolly was fine but you have to disconnect the driveshaft and the brakes are okay but there isnt much tongue weight.

The uhaul car trailer is BEEFY dual axle, sturdy, good brakes. Mine only had 200mi on it last time! You get plenty of tongue weight for a nice stable tow. For 1000mi of towing Id go with the easiest, most stable trailer. Your fuel economy will suck, but itll be a safe, stable ride

Sent from my SM-G950U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
947 Posts
Last year I shipped a vehicle from NH to south FL, about 1500 miles for $800.
A broker will get you that price but, you have to be flexible on the ship dates.
The truck won't leave until they have a full load and this time of year you're going the wrong way.

It's probably the cheapest choice when you consider rents, fuel, lodging, wear and tear, stress etc...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
490 Posts
Shipping is pretty steep at over $1000. Trailer rental was about $600.

For a single trip, the trailer rental is actually the cheapest option. If you try to flat tow a long distance then you'll want to be mindful that basically every State requires the towed vehicle to have active brakes. Setting up that braking in the toad will cost more than the trailer rental for one trip.


Also, you have to invest in some knowledge. I understand that different manual transmissions can have different rules for which gear it's in when you tow. You'd have to find an owners manual and follow the instructions to the letter, since different makes differ. Transfer case in neutral, but you'll want the tranny set per owner's manual as well.


I'm assuming you have small enough tires to fit on the rented trailer (maybe as small as 29" tires for U-Haul).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
For a single trip, the trailer rental is actually the cheapest option. If you try to flat tow a long distance then you'll want to be mindful that basically every State requires the towed vehicle to have active brakes. Setting up that braking in the toad will cost more than the trailer rental for one trip.


Also, you have to invest in some knowledge. I understand that different manual transmissions can have different rules for which gear it's in when you tow. You'd have to find an owners manual and follow the instructions to the letter, since different makes differ. Transfer case in neutral, but you'll want the tranny set per owner's manual as well.


I'm assuming you have small enough tires to fit on the rented trailer (maybe as small as 29" tires for U-Haul).
I do have a set of stock 30x9.5s I've been trying to get rid of so I could use those if need be. I haven't specifically looked at state regulations with flat tow brakes but I am aware that states have different regulations. I am just concerned about getting so close to the max capacity on the tacoma. At approx 4000lbs+ for the jeep and approx 2000lbs for the trailer I'm at over 6000lbs before I add in myself and my dog.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
185 Posts
Shipping is pretty steep at over $1000. Trailer rental was about $600.
It sounds like it will cost more to tow it unless you're doing that drive anyway. After trailer rental, gas, hotels, etc you'll be in more than just using a broker to find the cheapest commercial shipper. If you're doing the drive anyway for some reason that's different.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,000 Posts
Trailer rental will be MUCH less than that if you tow it round trip....
Uhaul charges a BUNCH more for one way rentals.

I'm not voting in the poll but I would suggest trailering....

Being close to tow rating isn't anything to worry about....
Like worrying because you need to haul 4.5 gal of gas in a 5 gal can.... lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
Dolly - a NO NO according to the Jeep manuals.

Flat - need to rig lighting and brake controller for both the tow vehicle and the toad.

Trailer - safest, most secure and easiest on you and the Jeep.

In the 2004 Jeep Wrangler owner's manual it states that "Internal damage to the transfer case will occur if a front or rear wheel lift is used when recreational towing". In the 2017 manual they actually have a chart about the three ways. For Dolly towing they are more straight forward and state simply "NOT ALLOWED".

If you use a trailer, you will need four ratchet straps to secure the Jeep properly. Two crossed in front angling to the front and two crossed in the rear angled to the rear. Hook to the frame, not the Jeep.

If you want to flat tow, an Automatic Transmission should be in Park and a manual transmission should be in gear. The Transfer Case must be in Neutral . (Not doing so can grenade the transfer case). And of course you have to rig the lights and brakes.

It has been a few years since I hauled a vehicle on a trailer. In all the cases I hauled a vehicle on a trailer, it was on a privately owned trailer with electric brakes and a two vehicle with the brake controller and never had an issue, even when a vehicle pulled in front suddenly in the rain. (Trailer brakes paid for themselves that day). U-Haul trailers generally used a hydraulic system activated by the pressure from the trailer ball on the coupler. They are surge brakes that activate when the trailer detects the two vehicle slowing down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,000 Posts
Technically you can put it on a tow dolly but you have to remove the rear drive shaft from the differential and wire it to the frame after the Jeep is loaded on the dolly

That said though, again, just trailer it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Before towing your Jeep make sure you have do the following. Contact Uhaul, they may not rent a trailer to you after you tell them what you plan to tow and what your going to use to tow. Make sure your brakes are 100%, your going to be at max or over capacity. The transmission on your 8 year old truck in good condition? How about your cooling system? This 1000 miles is going to be tough on your truck be prepared for almost anything to happen. The big one is can you stop that heavy load!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
947 Posts
Can you drive it? You could baby it and it would still be faster than a Taco hauling 6k.
An airline ticket has got to be under a $100 now.

Drove mine 700 miles up I-95 and didn't go much over 60mph except when situation dictated.
Left at 4pm got in at 8am.
It was the only time I ever got 20mpg.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
299 Posts
I think your off on the TJ weight. This was just brought up a few weeks ago IIRC but the question was about a YJ. Pretty sure it came to under 2900lbs with a soft top. I believe 3000 lbs is the magic number for trailer brakes in most states. I flat towed my 91 YJ 6 hours behind my 98 Taco 4x4 recently and it was fine. Your Taco is bigger and has more HP if you throw it on a trailer. Flat tow would be no problem until you had to lay into the brakes hard. You'd also be liable under the law if in fact the TJ is over the limit and had no brakes. The fly and drive RAOUL sounds pretty good. make an adventure out of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
To address some questions, my Taco is a 2012 TRD sport 4x4 with factory tow package..meaning factory trans cooler, oil cooler, 7 pin harness, plug and play for a trailer brake unit, increased tongue weight capacity of 640lbs, and increased towing capacity of 6,400lbs. The truck has 124,xxx with mostly highway miles. I did plan on already doing the drive round trip AL>CT>AL to pick up some more items from my move. Quadratec has the jeep GVWR at 4,450lbs and curb weight at 3,438lbs. I did think about flying back then driving it but shes a 99 with a rebuilt engine, swapped 94 trans. I'm sure she could do the drive but I don't really want to risk getting stuck somewhere. I planned on driving straight through, just stopping for gas and resting here and there, so I'd also rather sleep in the taco then in the wrangler with half doors, bikini top, and wind jammer haha. I will look more into the possibility of shipping to see if I can get a more accurate price. I am going to post this in the Tacoma World forum too, they're probably gonna butcher me for beating a dead horse on their end but oh well. I've towed a medium size uhaul moving trailer with no breaks with the taco before and it towed like a dream. If i had to guess it was probably around 2000-2500 lbs. However, after the $700 for the trailer rental, brake controller, gas, etc, it may just be cheaper and easier to have it shipped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,000 Posts
Again... towing the trailer round trip is MUCH MUCH less expensive..
Edit: just looked it up on the website... 3 days is $164
Uhaul auto transporters have surge brakes so no brake controller needed

Gvwr of the jeep is irrelevant.... curb weight is all that matters....
I think 2000 lbs is high for the trailer too...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,400 Posts
If I was in your position, I would also trailer it. U-Haul car haulers are made to haul vehicles and have the surge braking system. The surge brakes can be a bit aggravating in stop and go traffic, but generally on the highway not bad. You have to back up gently to avoid activating the brakes with a load on the trailer.

Plus you have the advantage of it's with you. Since you don't have a full top, you might want to consider a cab cover for the Jeep. This one even has a cable system with lock to protect the Jeep in high wind conditions.
https://www.quadratec.com/products/11081_2000_07.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
Flat towing with the Taco would suck. I've flat towed mine behind my Duramax and it would push that truck around a little. It would not be fun at all behind a truck as small and light as a Taco even if you were able to rig brakes on the Jeep.

Towing on a trailer is so much better. Most important thing is trailers have brakes.

Did I mention brakes? If I didn't, brakes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
230 Posts
I’d fly or rent a car to get there and drive it home. I’ve flat towed my Jeep with my 1/2 ton Silverado with no problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
I've flat towed ours behind our truck, no problems. No pushing, no wondering. How's the alignment on your Jeep? We flat towed from CA to UT and back without issue (~1900 miles RT). Just keep the speed down, and don't overload either vehicle. Remember that some models need to have the key in the first position to unlock the steering wheel lock. I forgot once and as soon as I pulled from the curb, the Jeep started pushing the back of the truck off center until I realized that I forgot, and went back to unlock the steering. After that, good to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Again... towing the trailer round trip is MUCH MUCH less expensive..
Edit: just looked it up on the website... 3 days is $164
Uhaul auto transporters have surge brakes so no brake controller needed

Gvwr of the jeep is irrelevant.... curb weight is all that matters....
I think 2000 lbs is high for the trailer too...
I completely agree that returning to the same location is way cheaper. But if i go that route, I cannot stay home in CT for long because I will be paying a daily rate on the trailer even though I am not using it. After this, it will be about the same price.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top