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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am a first time JK owner, and i'm curious about something. I am driving to Lansing from Grand Rapids this evening and its suppose to be nasty out. I always feel safer driving in 4wheel hi, but i read post where they say driving on pavement in 4wheel is bad for the vehicle. I'm wondering how fast and for how long can i keep it in 4wheel. Or if i really need to have it in 4wheel. I have a 2010 Sport Unlimited with 33x12.5/15 duratracts.
 

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yes driving on pavement in 4WD Hi is not good for your Jeep. nasty or not, 4WD doesn't keep you from spinning on ice or snow. it's for traction on loose terrain. :thumb:

i'd recommend keeping your JK in 2WD and just taking it easy on the roads. If you don't take your Jeep offroad.. or hardly do so, throwing it into 4WD once in a while isn't a bad idea... but I wouldn't go more than a couple 100 meters before back into 2WD.

As for max speed and 4WD... well, if you ask me, they sorta don't belong in the same sentence. :facepalm: but it wouldn't go over 45 or so in 4WD Hi...

-bob
 

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Never drive your Jeep in 4WD on dry pavement....it's very hard on the drive train. If you are on snow it is ok and here is why. When you put your jeep in 4WD it locks the front and back in sync. Your tires are not exactly the same size so that causes the gears to be in a bind putting stress into the system, so they need to be able to slip just a little to release this torque. The beauty of the Jeep is that if you run into bad road conditions you don't have to stop to put it into 4 WD high, as long as you are under 55 mph you can let off the gas and slip the transfer case into 4H and continue until your out of the condition then slip back into 2H. It is almost seamless, you only have to let off the accelerator and coast while changing the transfer case.
 

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It's really not a big deal. Unless you're pulling a u-turn on a dry road or pulling hard into a parking spot, you're not going "to do damage" to the vehicle. If the road has some intermittent slick spots, is snow covered, etc. you'll be fine in 4hi. Either way, you shouldn't be going over 55mph anyway, given the conditions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's really not a big deal. Unless you're pulling a u-turn on a dry road or pulling hard into a parking spot, you're not going "to do damage" to the vehicle. If the road has some intermittent slick spots, is snow covered, etc. you'll be fine in 4hi. Either way, you shouldn't be going over 55mph anyway, given the conditions.
That kinda sums it up. I have a feeling there will be bad and good spots. Didn't know if it was worse shifting it on and off, or better to just keep it in 4wd.
 

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My understanding is that you need slippage on the ground (i.e., low traction) when you make sharp turns and the like in 4H.

So that means no 4H driving around town, stop lights, corners, etc. unless the road conditions are so bad that you think it's likely the wheels will routinely slip a little bit. To me, I think "covered in snow" or "covered in ice," not "patches of snow" or "patches of ice," for around town driving.

On the highway in mostly straightlines, that's not as much of an issue. So somewhere between "covered in snow/ice" and "patchy snow/ice" would be okay. Your owners manual will tell you not to shift between 2H and 4H at greater than 50 mph. However, I don't believe the manual restricts your top speed in 4H (i.e., so long as you shift in before 50, you can go up to 70), though I wouldn't think you'd NEED 4H if you were comfortable doing over 50 mph.

You've got great tires, so that helps.
 

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So that means no 4H driving around town, stop lights, corners, etc. unless the road conditions are so bad that you think it's likely the wheels will routinely slip a little bit. To me, I think "covered in snow" or "covered in ice," not "patches of snow" or "patches of ice," for around town driving.
This is mostly correct. But, you've got enough backlash in the drivetrain to account for some slippage. Again, unless you're on slick roads, you don't need to be TURNING when you're in 4hi. Driving down the street is fine and the slight variations in direction will be accounted for, I assure you.

If it makes you feel safer and the conditions are OK, then use 4hi. Just be smart about it.....it would help if you understood what was going on in the transfer case and the entire concept of a center 'locked' transfer case so that you understand what I'm saying.

Here you go: http://www.wranglerforum.com/f33/what-does-4l-in-a-sahara-actually-do-134155.html

This is a good resource as well: http://www.jeepforum.com/forum/f27/what-why-do-i-need-locker-i-thought-i-had-4wd-242949/
 

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I'm of a different mind on the 4wd issue. If the roads are slick, use 4wd. As others have said, you don't wanna use it when backing out of a parking space, or anywhere you feel it "lurch" or "bite" – usually at low speed when turning. But if there's a chance there may be black ice on the road, or snow, then use it.

Did that for 8 years in my Liberty, with no ill effects.
 

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I'm of a different mind on the 4wd issue. If the roads are slick, use 4wd. As others have said, you don't wanna use it when backing out of a parking space, or anywhere you feel it "lurch" or "bite" – usually at low speed when turning. But if there's a chance there may be black ice on the road, or snow, then use it.

Did that for 8 years in my Liberty, with no ill effects.
Pretty sure the Liberty doesn't lock the front and rear driveshafts together like the JK does, though . . . .
 

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Ut-oh so that means when I drove on the highway at 50-60mph in 4HI that was a bad idea?

Torrential rain (lots of standing water) and high winds (40mph) made the extra stability of 4HI a must. The basic idea is you need to account for differences in rotation from the front to the rear. The only time you have a huge difference in rotation is when the steering wheel is cranked over for a turn. You can feel it all in the steering. If you ever feel it bind you shouldn't be in 4x4.

For me I will switch in and out as needed (it is shift on the fly). For example this morning the main roads in my town were mostly clear wet pavement while the side roads had a good amount of snow left. If I hit a side road, after the turn, I would lock it into 4HI. At the end of the road before pulling out onto another main road I popped it back into 2HI and so on.

Have fun with your Jeep.
 

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After reading some other threads on the subject, I think my stance has changed a bit moving forward. In that instance mentioned above I could have driven 10mph slower and felt completely safe and in control in 2H. Basically I used the 4x4 to gain a slight increase in traction/stability, however in hindsight the more responsible thing to have done would be to slow down. It is nice to know that in an extreme circumstance you could use the 4x4 to gain a slight advantage, but common sense means most of the time it is unnecessary.

My problem could also be the stock GY Wrangler STs which lose traction if the air is even slightly damp!
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for all the advice. I did drive to Lansing and back 170 miles total in 2WD the whole time. The roads were rough in some areas but i just slowed down. The only issues i had was all the small cars passing in the bad spots. I can't believe how some people have no clue.
 

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I am a first time JK owner, and i'm curious about something. I am driving to Lansing from Grand Rapids this evening and its suppose to be nasty out. I always feel safer driving in 4wheel hi, but i read post where they say driving on pavement in 4wheel is bad for the vehicle. I'm wondering how fast and for how long can i keep it in 4wheel. Or if i really need to have it in 4wheel. I have a 2010 Sport Unlimited with 33x12.5/15 duratracts.
The reason to avoid driving in 4hi/lo on hard surfaces is a function of physics. When turning, the inner and outer wheels make different sized radii. The outer wheels actually have to turn faster to cover greater distance then the inner. On loose ground, the inners simply slip a bit, no problem. On hard surfaces, the inners can't slip and you get driveline binding. The stresses can get high enough to potentially cause damage.

The plus side is that you can generally feel the binding in the steering and elsewhere IF YOU ARE ATTENTIVE.

Snow and ice are slippery enough to let the wheels slip.

You may experience some handling issues though.
 

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Information from the owners manual, page 348; should clear up any unanswered questions and misconceptions.
4H Position
This range locks the front and rear driveshafts together,
forcing the front and rear wheels to rotate at the same
speed. This range (4H) provides additional traction for
loose, slippery road surfaces and should not be used on
wet or dry pavement.
The “4WD Indicator Light” (located in the instrument
cluster) will illuminate when the transfer case is shifted
into the 4H position.​
N (Neutral) Position​
This range disengages the front and rear driveshafts from
the powertrain. It is to be used for flat towing behind
another vehicle. Refer to “Recreational Towing” in “Starting
and Operating” for further information.​
4L Position​
This range locks the front and rear driveshafts together,
forcing the front and rear wheels to rotate at the same
speed. This range (4L) provides additional traction and
maximum pulling power for loose, slippery road surfaces
only. Do not exceed 25 mph (40 km/h).
The “4WD Indicator Light” (located in the instrument
cluster) will illuminate when the transfer case is shifted
into the 4L position.​
Shifting Procedure​
2H to 4H or 4H to 2H​
Shifting between 2H and 4H can be made with the
vehicle stopped or in motion. If the vehicle is in motion,
shifts can be made up to 50 mph (80 km/h). With the
vehicle in motion, the transfer case will engage/
disengage faster if you momentarily release the accelerator
pedal after completing the shift. Apply a constant​
force when shifting the transfer case lever.
 

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So I see where it states about not shifting into 4H above 50mph, but can I drive at 60mph in 4H?
I know in my Silverado I can with no problems.
 
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