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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone know if the standard Jeep engine block heater can be added to a 2012 JKU by the dealer after delivery?

I had intended to order it with my Jeep, but after looking at the build sheet, I realized that it was overlooked when the order was entered by the dealer. (I should have caught that omission, but I missed it.) I'm sure that error will cost me more than the $35.00 option price.

I will be taking this Jeep to northern NH where it frequently drops to -20+ and a block heater seemed like a good option to have. I would also like to hear opinions on the need for one even at those temperatures.

Thanks.
 

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I've always had block heaters in my vehicles except for the last two (06 Cadillac STS and the Jeep). If I remember right, the Jeep dealer wanted $60.00 to install. I passed.
My cars are garaged overnight so it's not necessary. I find that fuel injected engines start real good no matter how cold it gets. Especially with synthetic oil. If they were outside overnight, I would have a block heater. I DO think that it's easier on the engine if its warmed up with a block heater for a few hours when extremely cold. Plus, you don't have to warm up the vehicle as long.

So, it depends on your situation. If it's going to be out overnight in -20 (and you have access to a 110V outlet), have your dealer install the heater. Or you can get one of those magnetic heaters that will stick to the oil pan. I haven't been under mine yet (next week for first oil change), so I assuming the oil pan isn't aluminum or something non-magnetic.
 

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You can buy magnetic or epoxy stick on heaters I have the stick on and it works great bought it at napa. When I'm out working in the field in northern alaska I found out quick at what temp fuel injection trucks won't start at, -32 for most v8 Chevys -36 for the fords they just won't fire without being plugged in, nothing likes to work when it's -20 below or colder.
Everyone should plug in there vehicle if it's lower than 10 below because 5w30 turns into the weight of gear lube and trust me your oil pump does not like to pump gear lube.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've always had block heaters in my vehicles except for the last two (06 Cadillac STS and the Jeep). If I remember right, the Jeep dealer wanted $60.00 to install. I passed.
My cars are garaged overnight so it's not necessary. I find that fuel injected engines start real good no matter how cold it gets. Especially with synthetic oil. If they were outside overnight, I would have a block heater. I DO think that it's easier on the engine if its warmed up with a block heater for a few hours when extremely cold. Plus, you don't have to warm up the vehicle as long.

So, it depends on your situation. If it's going to be out overnight in -20 (and you have access to a 110V outlet), have your dealer install the heater. Or you can get one of those magnetic heaters that will stick to the oil pan. I haven't been under mine yet (next week for first oil change), so I assuming the oil pan isn't aluminum or something non-magnetic.
$60.00 is certainly not a bank breaker. I do have a garage up there with 110 volt power. It is detached, so the only heat it gets is if I run the garage heater. I would prefer not to have to heat the whole building just to keep the Jeep warm. The minute you open up the doors, there goes the heat!

Another question is does the block heater heat the oil or the antifreeze? Keeping the oil warm is certainly a good idea, but heating the antifreeze means that you get heat a lot quicker. It takes a long time to warm up a vehicle at those temperatures.
 

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Subscribed I have been thinking for a block heater for my jeep and truck of course both gassers but the jeep won't start when it is real cold and the truck didn't like to start during the coldest time of last winter. Which was -30.
 

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Captchris said:
$60.00 is certainly not a bank breaker. I do have a garage up there with 110 volt power. It is detached, so the only heat it gets is if I run the garage heater. I would prefer not to have to heat the whole building just to keep the Jeep warm. The minute you open up the doors, there goes the heat!

Another question is does the block heater heat the oil or the antifreeze? Keeping the oil warm is certainly a good idea, but heating the antifreeze means that you get heat a lot quicker. It takes a long time to warm up a vehicle at those temperatures.
They sell three different kinds of heaters oil being the most important, coolant heater fits in a freeze plug, and automatic transmission heaters sticks on the pan.
Edit I have seen a coolant heater that fits in place of the lower radiator hose.
 

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Living in Kansas, we put block heaters on most of our vehicles or ordered them with block heaters installed. If it's parked outside, we have a block heater on it. I personally like the idea of keeping the engine warmer than the ambient temp during the winter. It doesn't get all that cold here, last year we had a few nights where we recorded -10 to -15 at night, but it's a small price to pay for a certain level of peace of mind.
 

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Yeah I see no need for this down south but interesting. Just my thoughts on engine heater, I maintain a lot of large engines offshore in the Gulf of mexico and we use coolant block heaters to ensure easy start up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You can buy magnetic or epoxy stick on heaters I have the stick on and it works great bought it at napa. When I'm out working in the field in northern alaska I found out quick at what temp fuel injection trucks won't start at, -32 for most v8 Chevys -36 for the fords they just won't fire without being plugged in, nothing likes to work when it's -20 below or colder.
Everyone should plug in there vehicle if it's lower than 10 below because 5w30 turns into the weight of gear lube and trust me your oil pump does not like to pump gear lube.
Thanks for this information. I have wondered at what temperature the fuel injection systems would start to quit. Most commercial grade electronic components are not happy to work below those temperatures. That makes sense.

If the dealer proves difficult on installing the block heater, I will definitely get an after market one.

Thanks
 

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I don't have one, but wouldn't mind using one if it came with my Jeep. I used to drive oil trucks that were plugged in overnight, and the windshields were even frost free in the morning from the little bit of engine heat. If I was in New England, I would pay the $60 labor. Your question had me interested, so I looked, and it appears to heat the coolant:
Description: The heater is mounted in a core hole (in place of a core hole plug) in the engine block, with the heating element immersed in coolant.

Operation: The block heater element is submerged in the cooling system’s coolant. When electrical power is supplied to the element, it creates heat. The heat is transferred to the engine coolant. This provides easier engine starting and faster warm-up when vehicle is operated in areas having extremely low temperatures.

Removal:
1. Drain cooling system
2. Detach power cord plug from heater
4. Loose screw in the center of heater. Remove heater assembly.

Installation:
1. Thoroughly clean core hole and heater seat.
2. Insert heater assembly with element loop positioned upward.
3. With heater seated, tighten center screw securely to assure a positive seal.
4. Connect power cord to heater
5. Fill cooling system
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I don't have one, but wouldn't mind using one if it came with my Jeep. I used to drive oil trucks that were plugged in overnight, and the windshields were even frost free in the morning from the little bit of engine heat. If I was in New England, I would pay the $60 labor. Your question had me interested, so I looked, and it appears to heat the coolant:
Description: The heater is mounted in a core hole (in place of a core hole plug) in the engine block, with the heating element immersed in coolant.

Operation: The block heater element is submerged in the cooling system’s coolant. When electrical power is supplied to the element, it creates heat. The heat is transferred to the engine coolant. This provides easier engine starting and faster warm-up when vehicle is operated in areas having extremely low temperatures.

Removal:
1. Drain cooling system
2. Detach power cord plug from heater
4. Loose screw in the center of heater. Remove heater assembly.

Installation:
1. Thoroughly clean core hole and heater seat.
2. Insert heater assembly with element loop positioned upward.
3. With heater seated, tighten center screw securely to assure a positive seal.
4. Connect power cord to heater
5. Fill cooling system
Now I see why they want $60.00 for labor. I'm beginning to kick myself for not being more careful when the dealer brought me the build sheet. :banghead:

After reading what everyone has said, it sounds like it will be worth having one.
 

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I'd like to have one since I live in new England. Do you think it makes a difference which kind? My gut tells me the only one worth getting is the one that heats engine oil, but I'm interested to hear other ideas. So the mopar one only does the coolant?

I think $60 is more than worth it. Last winter my mom left her BMW outside in the cold in NH and a lifter or rocker(not sure which one) froze, holding a valve open. This let oil pour into the cylinder and hydro locked the cylinder. After a $2000 repair I'd say $60 for peace of mind is more than worth it
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'd like to have one since I live in new England. Do you think it makes a difference which kind? My gut tells me the only one worth getting is the one that heats engine oil, but I'm interested to hear other ideas. So the mopar one only does the coolant?

I think $60 is more than worth it. Last winter my mom left her BMW outside in the cold in NH and a lifter or rocker(not sure which one) froze, holding a valve open. This let oil pour into the cylinder and hydro locked the cylinder. After a $2000 repair I'd say $60 for peace of mind is more than worth it
Now that I know the Mopar/Jeep one heats the coolant (Thanks Chewtoy) I will definitely want to go with that type. Heating the coolant has the benefit of keeping the whole block warm which will in turn will heat the oil. I like the idea that I will have heat in the cab quickly. With my GMC truck, which didn't have a block heater, it was a good 15-20+ minutes of warming up at -10 before I started to get heat. You should see what that does to the MPG!
 

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Captchris said:
Now that I know the Mopar/Jeep one heats the coolant (Thanks Chewtoy) I will definitely want to go with that type. Heating the coolant has the benefit of keeping the whole block warm which will in turn will heat the oil. I like the idea that I will have heat in the cab quickly. With my GMC truck, which didn't have a block heater, it was a good 15-20+ minutes of warming up at -10 before I started to get heat. You should see what that does to the MPG!
So I guess I'm a little unclear with what happens to fluids after you turn off the block. I'm under the assumption that most of the coolant drains back to the radiator. Does it actually stay in the block? If so then it would heat the whole block, not just the oil pan correct?
 

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Ordered our 12 Crush Rubi with a block heater, seems to be a cheap option considering the advantages on extreme cold nights.
 

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So I guess I'm a little unclear with what happens to fluids after you turn off the block. I'm under the assumption that most of the coolant drains back to the radiator. Does it actually stay in the block? If so then it would heat the whole block, not just the oil pan correct?
When you shut off the engine, the block stays full of coolant. The block heater is a electric heating coil that looks like the one in the bottom of an old electric coffee pot, but a bit smaller. It installs in one of the frost plug holes in the block. When plugged in, it heats tne coolant in the water jacket in the block. These type work the best IMHO.

Oil pan heaters work good too. I used to have an oil dipstick heater that made the difference between starting or not starting. I've seen people even put a large light bulb in the engine compartment and close the hood. When it's real cold, even the heat the light bulb puts out makes a noticeable difference.
 
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