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Discussion Starter #1
Yesterday I noticed I lost power to the interior switch that controls the falcon 3.4 shocks between soft and firm. After some investigating I discovered the fuse that goes to power (splices to 12v power outlet in dash) was blown, I replaced fuse and after turning key to power, the adjustment switch briefly lights up again before blowing the fuse. Any thoughts on what could be the issue? I purchased my JK with these shocks already installed and I am not too educated on vehicle electrical work so any input would be greatly appreciated!
 

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I'm not familiar with your shock system, but my guess would be that the power wire has either rubbed through the insulation and is shorting out or you have a bad splice/connection somewhere that is shorting out.

My tail lights were blowing the fuse everytime I turned them on with my trailer attached. Turns out the license plate light on my trailer had come loose and the hot wire was shorting out against the taillight housing.

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If I remember correctly the falcon 3.4 shocks are air driven... so I guess you're saying you have the compressor working off the 12 volt outlet?
 

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Correct they are air driven and controlled by a switch that is attached to the included wiring harness that runs to a solenoid attached to the compressor. Compressor is powered through an SPOD. 3 wires on back of switch, one to solenoid, one to ground, one spliced to outlet. All wiring seems intact. Could a faulty solenoid cause fuses to blow?
 

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Correct they are air driven and controlled by a switch that is attached to the included wiring harness that runs to a solenoid attached to the compressor. Compressor is powered through an SPOD. 3 wires on back of switch, one to solenoid, one to ground, one spliced to outlet. All wiring seems intact. Could a faulty solenoid cause fuses to blow?

Is this a lighted switch? There shouldn't be a ground on the switch unless it's lighted.


In the case of a lighted switch, make sure you haven't got the ground on the switch control instead of the light.


Measure the resistance of both of al solenoids. They should be similar. (If you have one which in near to 0 ohms). Figure out the amperage required for each solenoid (amps = 14.5/resistance). Add those 4 amperages together and make sure they are less than the rated fuse you are blowing.
 
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