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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hmmm... dunno if this should be on tech side, but anyways:

Front anti-sway bar is on my build list, and I just got thinkin what if I put the disconnect only on one side? I'm really too tired to figure it out right now, but any possible downsides to that?

If the a-s bar stays hooked on one side, will it hit something on bigger flexes? Will it exceed its range of motion? Will it [something something]?
 

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I’m assuming this is a non-Rubicon? If so, sway bar disconnects are a very common and good upgrade to do in order to improve axle articulation. There are a million suppliers of these. And what you need to get depends completely on the current suspension setup. The axle will still be located and controlled just fine between the control arms and the track bar for the axle.

Factors for sway bar disconnects:
  • Do you have a lift, and if so how much?
  • Lifted or not, you’ll want to confirm your shocks can extend and compress appropriately with the added movement
  • Lifted or not, the same principles apply to the brake lines

Now there are hotrod solutions like the anti rock bar from Currie I think that are well established, but simple sway bar disconnects are way simple and a lot cheaper.
 

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Hmmm... dunno if this should be on tech side, but anyways:

Front anti-sway bar is on my build list, and I just got thinkin what if I put the disconnect only on one side? I'm really too tired to figure it out right now, but any possible downsides to that?

If the a-s bar stays hooked on one side, will it hit something on bigger flexes? Will it exceed its range of motion? Will it [something something]?
Look at jks flex commect disco. One solid link, one sprung link. They are also removeable. Interesting tech.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I got a 2.5" lift on an non rubicon. Shocks are gonna get upgraded too. Brakeline drops (or longer tubes) coming also.

I'm well aware there are a plethora of products out there.

Regarding boobjobs, I personally prefer two equally sized ones, but I bet there is a market niche for for all kinds of setups.

My original questions stands.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Look at jks flex commect disco. One solid link, one sprung link. They are also removeable. Interesting tech.

Sent from my SM-G975U using Tapatalk
Interesting, not exactly what I was looking for but gotta check this out. Thanks!
 

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Yea but why? Because it has always been done so, or for a good reason, which would be ____?
When my front tire gets tucked all the way up to my fender, I don't want a 10+" sway bar connected behind it. When I go to flex, the sway bar limits the amount of downward flex. The sway bar can also flip the other direction and bind up or break against the tie rod. Going over washboards, the vibration doesn't do great things for the jeep, why have one side of the sway bar connected and trash the bushing, but still have the other side in perfect condition.

The difficult part of taking the sway bar disconnect off is the first one, the second one doesn't have any pressure on it and is super easy to take off. Leaving one side connected is lazy and half-assed way of doing it, in my opinion.

I have a box of about 6 pairs of sway bars that aren't on the jeep, so I have tried a few and broken a few. I'm using JKS adjustable connects on my Rubi, to take off when I'm offroading. The Rubi auto disconnect doesn't work great with a lift and additional flex.
 

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I got a 2.5" lift on an non rubicon. Shocks are gonna get upgraded too. Brakeline drops (or longer tubes) coming also.

I'm well aware there are a plethora of products out there.

Regarding boobjobs, I personally prefer two equally sized ones, but I bet there is a market niche for for all kinds of setups.

My original questions stands.
If you are struggling with the concept of why one side could be disconnected and the other not, you may want to opt for not doing anything. So you want one side to drop more than the other? Uh, OK. If you know there are solutions out there, I don’t really get the question. If you “disconnect” one side and not the other, what exactly are you trying to accomplish? Will it hit something at full droop or flex? I don’t know, just seems kinda dumb to even find out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
If you are struggling with the concept of why one side could be disconnected and the other not, you may want to opt for not doing anything. So you want one side to drop more than the other? Uh, OK. If you know there are solutions out there, I don’t really get the question. If you “disconnect” one side and not the other, what exactly are you trying to accomplish? Will it hit something at full droop or flex? I don’t know, just seems kinda dumb to even find out.
It would seem you are struggling with the concept of anti-sway bar. If you disconnect either end, the anti-sway bar no longer works, for either side of the suspension. It will articulate with the side that is still connected, and the friction of the bushings might affect movement a bit.

Anti-sway bar is essentially just a torsion spring attached to the frame with bushings or, in fancy applications, bearings, allowing free rotational movement w/r to the body of the car.


What I'm thinking about is if in such a case the range of movement of the free end of the sway bar might be a problem. If not, there is no need to disconnect both sides. So just for the sake of KISS -principle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
When my front tire gets tucked all the way up to my fender, I don't want a 10+" sway bar connected behind it. When I go to flex, the sway bar limits the amount of downward flex. The sway bar can also flip the other direction and bind up or break against the tie rod. Going over washboards, the vibration doesn't do great things for the jeep, why have one side of the sway bar connected and trash the bushing, but still have the other side in perfect condition.

The difficult part of taking the sway bar disconnect off is the first one, the second one doesn't have any pressure on it and is super easy to take off. Leaving one side connected is lazy and half-assed way of doing it, in my opinion.

I have a box of about 6 pairs of sway bars that aren't on the jeep, so I have tried a few and broken a few. I'm using JKS adjustable connects on my Rubi, to take off when I'm offroading. The Rubi auto disconnect doesn't work great with a lift and additional flex.
Thanks, this is what I was looking for! So both sides it is.
 

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The idea of disconnecting your sway bars is to gain more flex, but also not to break sway bar links (for me at least). Disconnecting both, will save them both. Then stretch it out!

4518814
 

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It would seem you are struggling with the concept of anti-sway bar. If you disconnect either end, the anti-sway bar no longer works, for either side of the suspension. It will articulate with the side that is still connected, and the friction of the bushings might affect movement a bit.

Anti-sway bar is essentially just a torsion spring attached to the frame with bushings or, in fancy applications, bearings, allowing free rotational movement w/r to the body of the car.


What I'm thinking about is if in such a case the range of movement of the free end of the sway bar might be a problem. If not, there is no need to disconnect both sides. So just for the sake of KISS -principle.
Yer too smart for me. I’m out. But for the record, you are wrong and it doesn’t work the way you think it does.
 

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I'd think you'll want both sides. if you disconnect only one side, the disconnected side will swing freely and might hit something down there. Never thought about it and/or have never done it that way where you can only disconnect one side. I've always disconnected both sides, and both sides get mounted onto something. I've used the Teraflex disconnects and they provide a spot and the hardware to mount the sway links, but i found rubbing under extrem flex so i used couple of ubolts and hose clamps with sucess.
I have the JKS disconnects on my Jeep after everybody said they're way better.Found you'll have to figure out how to hold the sway bar links to something. I tried the same thing i did before with the ubolts and the clamps but the TF bushings are big compared to thin ones i have in the JKS links. Don't know if the edges on the clamp will damage the bushings so i may use something different.

You can see exactly what i'm talking about here:

2021-07-15_07-48-12 by RAM RSM, on Flickr

2021-07-15_07-47-48 by RAM RSM, on Flickr
 
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Some people will only disconnect one side when they are wheeling down an easy but bumpy trail. As long as you aren’t flexing the suspension too much it’s the same effect. But if you start flexing out the suspension with one side connected you start risking either suspension travel limitations or worse suspension damage. The most common suspension damage doing that would be flipping the still connected sway bar link. If that happens your day will take a pretty serious turn for the worse.
The links are sold in pairs, I would install both. I always disconnect both at the same time, as mentioned the second one is simple to disconnect and reconnect. But I know people who will only do one side on easy trails. I don’t do that because you never know when an easy trail will suddenly get hard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yer too smart for me. I’m out. But for the record, you are wrong and it doesn’t work the way you think it does.
Indulge me, how exactly does the anti-sway bar system work? I'm more than happy to change my mind if I got it figured out wrong.

This is not a competition about smarts for me, I just think it is essential to undestand the mechanics and physics of how ones car works. I was not sure about the onesided disconnect, but the helpful members of this forum have kindly provided me with the knowledge I was lacking.
 

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Disconnect both sides and swing the bar up as far out of the way of the axle and suspension components as possible. If you want to be able to flex enough to justify disconnecting the sway bar then it is quite possible the connected side will drop enough to make the other end contact the axle when that side is flexed upward. If you aren't flexing enough to make contact you probably didn't need to disconnect anyway.

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