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Discussion Starter #1
I searched the forum and did not find an answer- I have a 2002 TJ with about 140,000 miles and as I did my normal oil change today I saw that my front rotors look scared and eaten into by the pads. It has been forever since I have done a brake job but I thin I can handle it. My main question is- if I cannot get the rotors turned because of being to worn, should I also do the bearings? Is that just a given based on the mileage?
 

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If the rotors are wiped out... Just pickup new ones. Unit bearings are an entirely separate component.... Don't think of the TJ dana 30 as an old GM style Dana 44/60.... Completely different animal
 

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I either don't know what you are talking about or I misrepresented my question. The last rotors I replaced were on a 97 Chevy truck and it had inside bearings and outside bearings. I just cleaned those up and stuck them back in with new rotors and it worked fine.
I have not done this kind of job on a jeep yet so I only assume that the front rotors will have the same set up- inside rotor bearings and outside rotor bearings. I am a little fearful about why you choose to mention the differences in dana. I am guessing there may be more to it than I think if it matters which axle I have.
Come to think of it, I have never worked on front rotors on a 4WD before.
 

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I either don't know what you are talking about or I misrepresented my question. The last rotors I replaced were on a 97 Chevy truck and it had inside bearings and outside bearings. I just cleaned those up and stuck them back in with new rotors and it worked fine.
I have not done this kind of job on a jeep yet so I only assume that the front rotors will have the same set up- inside rotor bearings and outside rotor bearings. I am a little fearful about why you choose to mention the differences in dana. I am guessing there may be more to it than I think if it matters which axle I have.
Come to think of it, I have never worked on front rotors on a 4WD before.
Heres a great write up on it. I have used this site for a lot of projects. Just look around the page and you can find most anything your after.
Jeep TJ Front Disc Brake Pads and Rotor Replacement
 

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Glad someone posted a link for you.... By the pics on that link you can see where I was coming from. Lol
 

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You may want to consider replacing the calipers while you're there, as a proactive measure based on age & mileage. Both of mine started sticking around the 130k-160k mile range.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Got it done this morning. Only took about 1 1/2 hours- I work slow and lose tools all the time. Everything works for now so I'm going hog hunting for the rest of the day. Thanks for all the help.
 

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You may want to consider replacing the calipers while you're there, as a proactive measure based on age & mileage. Both of mine started sticking around the 130k-160k mile range.
They very likely started sticking right after you replaced brake pads. One should ALWAYS flush the system first before replacing pads and pushing the caliper pistons in.

It should be done anyway about every 2 years or so and at any brake work that involves retracting the pistons.

Crap settles in the piston bores and you trap it between the bore wall and the piston which causes them to stick and ruin stuff.
 
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