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So I was thinking...The factory front diff oil level is lower than the rear. Most aftermarket covers only have one hole, which typically looks pretty near the stock rear level. That would mean that most people with aftermarket covers on the front diff are running an oil level that is higher than stock. Is that a concern?

I guess it could theoretically leak out the seals or foam up the oil. Does it really matter in real life, though?
 

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So I was thinking...The factory front diff oil level is lower than the rear. Most aftermarket covers only have one hole, which typically looks pretty near the stock rear level. That would mean that most people with aftermarket covers on the front diff are running an oil level that is higher than stock. Is that a concern?

I guess it could theoretically leak out the seals or foam up the oil. Does it really matter in real life, though?
As long as they fill the required amount that the mfg suggests for their axle, they should be fine. Stock covers, many will fill up until it starts flowing out the hole but for aftermarket, they would need to defer to actual numbers, usually 1 to 1.75 quarts depending if d30, d35,d44.

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Discussion Starter #3
As long as they fill the required amount that the mfg suggests for their axle, they should be fine. Stock covers, many will fill up until it starts flowing out the hole but for aftermarket, they would need to defer to actual numbers, usually 1 to 1.75 quarts depending if d30, d35,d44.

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But you use an aftermarket cover with extra capacity, filling based on the factory volume would result in a fluid level below the factory spec. For sure, that can't be good.
 

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But you use an aftermarket cover with extra capacity, filling based on the factory volume would result in a fluid level below the factory spec. For sure, that can't be good.
At that point it's up to the discretion of the driver who modifies the cover. What I would so is eye ball where the hole used to be and mark it againt the new cover, then determine how much oil it needs and document it.

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Yeah getting the right fill height relative to the axle tubes is the best bet. ARB recommends this with their covers, you mark their dipstick at the same height as the stock fill hole (with both covers setting on the bench side by side) so that you can easily confirm the fill level. In my experience with those covers, they have basically the same volume as stock so when I put in the stock recommended volume of fluid, the level was at the right height too.

Also erring a bit on the high side won't hurt anything, any excess will just blow out the breather tube and just make a bit of a mess. Mine came overfilled from the factory.
 

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My ARB aftermarket covers use a dip stick. You mark the fill level on the dip stick based on the fill plug on the factory cover (fairly easy to do). That allows you to fill to the same level as with the stock cover regardless of any differences in volume of the cover.
Other aftermarket covers have two holes, to allow them to work in multiple applications.
But really I don't think this is as critical as you might be making it out to be. The differences are small, and in a splash lubricated system the level is not as critical.
 
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