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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Kjeeper, this might be right up your alley:

So, I've been looking at the front shocks and thinking about the caster and pinion relationship. I understand that there is about 6-7° of adjustment in the JK.

Basically, adjust and extend the front UCA's to reduce caster and raise pinion angle. Shorten UCA's and caster angle gets better (higher) but the front pinion angle drops which looks bad & makes me worry. (I know the front is not under power all the time so it’s not quite the same issue as it is in the back)

Looking at the lower shock mounts, it appears that the tabs are sufficiently long to allow for a hole to be drilled in front of the existing mount to relocate the shock forward thereby increasing the caster angle and raise the pinion angle. Since the hole would be closer to the axle, shear stress would not be an issue.

Another idea would be a relocation tab of some sort to bolt into the stock hole in the tab like a triangular gusset and raise the shock up and forward a bit. Connecting it to the axle would probably be necessary there though.

A question in my mind (probably more pertinent) is regarding the source of the caster. Are we mainly concerned with shock angle or is the angle of the C’s on the axle more paramount in the handling of the Jeep (return to center)? I have not seen the geometry question asked quite like this so the concept is not 100% clear in my mind & possibly worthy of discussion.

Thoughts?
 

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Shocks are completely independent of caster. No changes will have any effect.

Also, the front driveshaft spins all the time...

It's the C's on the axle. They start with conservative geometry to fit the lift height and geometry of a stock Jeep. As we lift above stock, we complicate the pinion to caster relationship. Most aftermarket axles increase the caster built in to the C's to allow for a corrected pinion angle. Most times, you can run acceptable caster on the stock axle up to about 3.5 to 4". Some not great, but most are workable by just setting control arm lengths.

Geometry brackets do also have a slight effect on improved pinion angle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Shocks are completely independent of caster. No changes will have any effect....It's the C's on the axle...
That makes sense & explains more why I have heard discussions about cutting and rotating C's. Not a welder here so that's not even a consideration. Thanks for the clarification.
 

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Shocks are completely independent of caster. No changes will have any effect.

Also, the front driveshaft spins all the time...

It's the C's on the axle. They start with conservative geometry to fit the lift height and geometry of a stock Jeep. As we lift above stock, we complicate the pinion to caster relationship. Most aftermarket axles increase the caster built in to the C's to allow for a corrected pinion angle. Most times, you can run acceptable caster on the stock axle up to about 3.5 to 4". Some not great, but most are workable by just setting control arm lengths.

Geometry brackets do also have a slight effect on improved pinion angle.

And what language is this??? This is not english.....:worthy:
 

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And what language is this??? This is not english.....:worthy:
Yea, I'm not sure what I was trying to say... :tomatoes:

But I stand by it! :beerdrinking:
 
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