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You're only looking at the torque of the engine. Different tire sizes and and axle ratios alter the overall torque multiplication through the drivetrain to the road.

For example, 35" tires are 9% larger than the stock 32.1" tires, so torque multiplication will be reduced by the inverse of 9%, which is about 9.2%. The relative comparison to stock is now about 201 ft-lbs @1900 rpm compared to the 223 ft-lbs @ 2080 rpm. That's about 9.9% less torque making it to the wheels at whatever particular road speed you chose for your comparison.

Additionally, those 35" tires are much heavier, with a lot of weight further from the center of rotation, meaning a more rotational inertia that must be overcome. So even less torque actually makes it to the ground.
 

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You might want to redo your analysis. You use "actual size" for the 35's but advertised size for the stock tires. Actual size of the 255/75R17 tires is closer to 31 than 32. In fact, the computer on my Jeep had to be programmed to 31.01 in order to make the speedometer accurate. My 315/70R17 tires worked out to 33.48.

But to answer your question, it's seat of the pants feeling. Stepping up to 35's has a significant effect on acceleration. It's not unlivable but it is noticeable. The more you step up the tire size, the lower in the RPM range you put the engine. And the 3.8 is a dog at lower RPMs. The 4.10 gears with the automatic is "adequate" with stock size tires. But that's all it is. Step up to much bigger tires not only drops your RPMs but it adds weight and rolling resistance. And that has a significant effect on performance. You can still get down the highway just fine but you're stuck in the slow lane or you're constantly downshifting just to keep up.
 
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