Jeep Wrangler Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Anyone useing Magellan TR-TRX gps? If so how are they for ease of use? Looks like a good unit as long as you don’t need to be an electronics tech to use it.
 

·
Knows a couple things...
Joined
·
48,964 Posts
I've looked at their new trail units like the TR-TRX several times but I'm not happy with their maps or trails. None of the very popular trails I enjoy are on their map webpage which I find odd. They're some of the most popular trails in SOCAL yet none are in the database. The map they give is hard to use too, it leaves a lot of information out and makes it hard to find what you're looking for. I'm good with GPS and have owned 7-8 over the years but Magellan just doesn't make anything I'm interested in any more. In fact, the very first GPS I bought was a Magellan, I used it for flying... it was the first GPS made for aviation use. Then I won a Magellan GPS 3 years ago and it really seemed cheap, its plastic just didn't seem like it'd hold up. I personally lost interest in the new Magellans once I figured out their preloaded maps don't seem to be even close to complete as they should be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,018 Posts
I have used a Magellan GPS for the Sport Trak (2006/7?)came out. Seemed a bit expensive at the time but it did just what I wanted. I had been using several GPS's since they first appeared and even used some in a minefield (Yep) during my active duty days.

I am on my forth model now 610 and it works well for navigational purposes in the Jeep. It was a very good secondary backup for my trip across America in which I had all my routes planted. I used a Garmin Nuvi with an SD card as primary for a bigger screen.

Screen size I think is the first thing you will need to consider. Especially if you are driving and trying to navigate at the same time. We still missed turns while talking and distracting each other during that long trip. The Magellan 610 will not do road routes like what you may want, it is designed for off road and hiking mainly.

There is a computer program that you can use in conjunction with the handheld products called Vantage Point. Laying out trips and routes there are pretty simple once you get the hang of it. Then it all gets transferred to the handheld unit. Swapping info back and forth is pretty much a easy task.

I too thought of a larger unit Magellan TR-TRX but I have used these smaller ones for hiking/sightseeing and Geocaching. Sized just a bit larger than a flip-phone.

Jerry mentioned the lack of trails but failed to mention that many of the trails are added to the GPS as you drive and label them. Folks then download the trails to Magellan and they get put on the latest, updated maps,; as I understand how that works. I almost purchased on for TAT adventure but I decided not to because I didn't want the trouble of learning a new system to interfere with my travels. As I look back on it, I think the redundancy might have been a good mental insurance policy. As it turned out we did just find with what we had.

During the Trans America Trail (TAT) we traveled over 5500 miles and I never had a lick of trouble out of the Magellan or the maps. I will mention too that all the road names aren't what you might find when you get to a spot. (Garmin seems better at this) Keeping charts and maps up to date is a hard job for any organization. So, I can't fault them there.

What you want to do with the GPS is going to drive you toward the features you need though.

Tracking
Routing
Accuracy
Battery longevity
Size
Ease of operation
etc.

Best wishes:iamhappy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,018 Posts
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top