Jeep Wrangler Forum banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
When I was evacuated from my home my Wrangler was in water that was level with the top of the hood. He sat in water for approx 48 hours. When the water was at the highest point (that I witnessed) the alarm went off.
I came back to the house today and opened the doors to help dry the inside out.
My question is there is hope of letting him dry out and replacing the battery, fluids and electrical components and the Jeep starting? I know most Auto insurance companies total out a car who has been under water but I don't have full coverage so I am trying to see if there is a realistic way to save the Jeep or if it makes more sense to walk away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
266 Posts
Couldn't hurt to get in t0uch with a 4 wheel shop have it towed to the shop have them get all the water out check all the wiring and have them look it over. I'm very sorry for your current situation and I pray everything gets back to normal fast. Wish I could go help out but I'm in mass. No money for the drove and have 2 kids and 2 dogs that need to be taken care of good luck with everything. I know a couple guys on the Massachusetts rescue team that went down there to help. Again hope everything gets better soon.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
179 Posts
Sorry to hear about your Jeep.

I guess where there is a will there is a way. All of the mechanical components can be flushed and salvaged...

Just don't do anything silly like trying salvage any of the electronic components or electrical connections...cause every harness, soldered connection, and circuit board in your Jeep is now a ticking time bomb...

Even after completely drying out they will continue to rapidly degrade until failure.

If this was a phone you dropped in a pool and you only needed it to last another 9 months until your next upgrade I'd say "Sure stick it in a bag of rice and take your chances."

That said, I'm relatively new to the Jeep world and I'm amazed by the amount of aftermarket support. Depending on the year of your Jeep, it's possible that entire replacement electrical systems could be available at a decent price. Hopefully others will chime in on that front.

It's a tough decision, especially if filing a claim with your insurance isn't an option...best of luck and keep us posted on what you decide.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,181 Posts
Not a good situation.

I would try to dry it out, change fluids and give it a good once or twice over, but as an earlier member stated, be ready to walk away if it doesn't work. The electrical system will be your nemesis in all this....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,032 Posts
A quick dunk in clean water would be one thing, but 2 days in flood water. I would walk. The entire dash with all the electronics is toast. Oil floats on top of water so the diffs get full and the water lifts the oil, same with engine and trans.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
The reason why insurance companies usually total flood vehicles is that the money to fix everything is more than the vehicle is worth. Even though you don't have insurance, the principle still applies. I think it is time to walk away. If you have anything on the jeep that is worth saving and putting on your next jeep, I would take those off and save for later. It is unfortunate that you're going through this, but life sucks sometimes. I wish you the best of luck in rebuilding and keep us updated on your situation. Just remember, material things can always be replaced. Be glad you got out of there in time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,118 Posts
Depends on time and $$. I couldn't walk away from what is a solid vehicle, but would be doing all the work myself and not be surprised when things go wrong. Swapping the fluids and seeing what happens given it a chance.

All the external electronics are fairly well sealed and many people dunk them regularly.
The internals are Chrysler 200 spec and likely to have suffered.

If you have other things going on, like property and family caught up in the disaster then it's a bit academic and that needs sorting first.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,178 Posts
No real advice but my heart goes out to all the folks who got flooded. With water that high and for that much time, I would not have confidence in the vehicle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
339 Posts
I work for an insurance company and our policy is a vehicle is automatically totaled if the water even touches the dash. The main reason for this as others have stated is the amount of electrical connections that have been potentially compromised. If you are dead set on saving it you will need to open, clean, and add dielectric grease to EVERY connection. You will need access to everything in the harness. Engine, behind the dash, on top of the trans/transfer case, and most importantly all of the airbag and passenger restraint components. You will also need to replace your airbags, control module, clock spring, and seat belt buckles. After that is done you will then need to have them all reprogrammed by a dealer or local mobile SRS company that can do it.
You will need to spend upwards of $3k just in airbag components...
It's up to you to decide if all the work and cost is worth it, but I would change all the fluids, make sure it runs and then part it out. Engine, trans, axles, body parts, all of it.
I think you could make enough to get a nice cheap used get around until you are able to afford another Jeep.
I am sorry you are going through this but I think that you will always be chasing something wrong with this if you put it back on the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,065 Posts
Assuming that everything isn't already toast, I think you have a fine chance of a fully functional Jeep. Drain all the fluids and then buy the cheapest fluids you can find at walmart and refill. I would think you will also have to drop the gas tank and check it over. Dry everything out as best you can and take the dash apart enough so that most if not all of the electronics are exposed. Take the carpet and all the black paneling trim off. After you have as much removed as you can use leaf blower to blow out all the standing puddles of water you can find and in areas you can't see. On the fuse box use a shop vac to vacuum it out if you can, then pull each fuse check it and put it back in. Park the jeep in the sun with the top off and the hood removed. Let the jeep sit like that for a week and roll it back into the garage if there is more rain. Fire the Jeep up and if it works drive it for a couple hundred miles then change the fluids with the good stuff. My father's 1996 7.3 CC F250 was flooded in 1997 and 22 years later its still works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
552 Posts
Assuming that everything isn't already toast, I think you have a fine chance of a fully functional Jeep. Drain all the fluids and then buy the cheapest fluids you can find at walmart and refill. I would think you will also have to drop the gas tank and check it over. Dry everything out as best you can and take the dash apart enough so that most if not all of the electronics are exposed. Take the carpet and all the black paneling trim off. After you have as much removed as you can use leaf blower to blow out all the standing puddles of water you can find and in areas you can't see. On the fuse box use a shop vac to vacuum it out if you can, then pull each fuse check it and put it back in. Park the jeep in the sun with the top off and the hood removed. Let the jeep sit like that for a week and roll it back into the garage if there is more rain. Fire the Jeep up and if it works drive it for a couple hundred miles then change the fluids with the good stuff. My father's 1996 7.3 CC F250 was flooded in 1997 and 22 years later its still works.


I realize I 1996 vehicle had exponentially more electronics than a 1970s vehicle, but the difference between 1996 and the original posters jeep is N even greater divide.
Praying for all you guys and gals in Houston.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
728 Posts
Don't forget to remove the spark plugs and turn the motor over by hand at first to make sure you blow out any water that might be in your cylinders. Once you get the big slugs of water out you can try spinning the motor with the starter to blow out the rest.
Wouldn't hurt to squirt some WD40 in the holes and crank it a lot to blow that out too.
Then once your sure the cylinders are emptied of water then you can put the plugs back in.

If you leave the plugs in and try to spin it with the starter and there is water in the cylinders then you will hydro lock the motor and possibly bend some internal parts.

.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,065 Posts
I realize I 1996 vehicle had exponentially more electronics than a 1970s vehicle, but the difference between 1996 and the original posters jeep is N even greater divide.
Praying for all you guys and gals in Houston.
Biggest difference would be under the cluster but even then we are still talking about a series of sensors hooked to microchips by wire on both vehicles. The JK has a few more displays and more electronics in the climate control system, but its not radically different from my father's 7.3. The 7.3 was just as fly by wire as the 3.6. When it comes to electronics and liquid you just don't know until you know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
925 Posts
My brothers old 1980s car was submerged once. With lot's of time and elbow grease (and new $$ interior) we got it running and it was running fine since.

Mechanically, I don't see why your Jeep could not be restored. Getting the electronics in order is going to bite you.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top