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Keep in mind no HID is legal for street use. I bought some deltas. Very inexpensive, wires are a bit short for how I wanted to route it but easy fix. Also they are all setup to accept halos, the prismatic lens shows DOT and SAE to help defer attention lol
 

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Well crap I was hoping to get hid's cheaper than led's
Retro HID kits are cheap, but they suck and are not DOT legal.

The premium headlight club has an entry fee...
 

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Having run HIDs for several years in cars, the switch to LED and the price is laughable.
 

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I ran HIDs as well but the Leds I have now are 10 times better and legal. They were only around $200 as well. That's pretty close to what you will pay for a decent HId setup. Mine are not bulbs either.
 

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Retro HID kits are cheap, but they suck and are not DOT legal.

The premium headlight club has an entry fee...
What makes a headlamp legal or illegal?

First, we need to make clear, the DOT does not approve or disapprove of manufactured or otherwise lighting. The manufacturer or distributor of the product may mark the lamp with "DOT" to indicate that the product meets the standards set forth by the DOT. Those standards generally concern pattern and glare. The DOT does not perform product testing - at all. By using the DOT mark, the manufacturer asserts the product meets all applicable regulatory requirements.

When altering the way your lighting performs (especially with our community consisting of many lifted vehicles and aftermarket lighting options), we need to consider what's written in the law, and what the ultimate intent of the law is.

This nonsense of the lack of "DOT Approved" printed on a lamp equals it's illegal gets blindly tossed around all too often and advocates a false message.

Scenario 1: Me. I have DIY headlamps that consist of a clear cut beam pattern and are correctly aimed. I've tested them behind low-to-the ground sports cars and have concluded that they are nowhere near a threat to oncoming drivers or drivers in front of me. I am of no threat to other drivers on the road, but I don't have "DOT" stamped on my lens, so I'm not "legal."

Meanwhile...

Scenario 2: Other Jeeper. Has 4" of lift and "DOT" approved lamps that have not been adjusted for the ride height of his vehicle. He also drives with his fog lights illuminated on a clear summer night - because it looks cool. He's a threat to other drivers on the road, but it's okay, because he has "DOT" stamped on his lamp.

Who's operating within the legal limits of the law?

Read the law, assess your vehicle or hire someone to assess your vehicle, and determine if you're abiding by the law.

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/49/571.108
 

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This has nothing to do with aiming... That's a silly argument.

To be DOT compliant a light unit must be assayed to be 100% compliant with Federal standard FMVSS108. The MFG then adds the DOT stamp on the lens and doing so takes complete legal responsibility for being compliant.

Plain and simple... Nothing built in someone's garage ever will be.

It's not nonsense...
 

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This has nothing to do with aiming... That's a silly argument. To be DOT compliant a light unit must be assayed to be 100% compliant with Federal standard FMVSS108. The MFG then adds the DOT stamp on the lens and doing so takes complete legal responsibility for being compliant. Plain and simple... Nothing built in someone's garage ever will be.

It's not nonsense...
Aiming is very much a part of the law (see the link I posted to earlier, it's the same standard you referenced - FMVSS108).

The law does not state you need a stamp on your headlamp to be compliant. You simply must be compliant with the law. This is the part that people are misinformed on.

It's short-sighted to say only a manufacturing plant (most of which are in Asia and neither of us likely know anything about the process of experimentation and testing they undertake) are capable of producing a product that conforms with the law.
 

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What makes a headlamp legal or illegal?

First, we need to make clear, the DOT does not approve or disapprove of manufactured or otherwise lighting. The manufacturer or distributor of the product may mark the lamp with "DOT" to indicate that the product meets the standards set forth by the DOT. Those standards generally concern pattern and glare. The DOT does not perform product testing - at all. By using the DOT mark, the manufacturer asserts the product meets all applicable regulatory requirements.

When altering the way your lighting performs (especially with our community consisting of many lifted vehicles and aftermarket lighting options), we need to consider what's written in the law, and what the ultimate intent of the law is.

This nonsense of the lack of "DOT Approved" printed on a lamp equals it's illegal gets blindly tossed around all too often and advocates a false message.

Scenario 1: Me. I have DIY headlamps that consist of a clear cut beam pattern and are correctly aimed. I've tested them behind low-to-the ground sports cars and have concluded that they are nowhere near a threat to oncoming drivers or drivers in front of me. I am of no threat to other drivers on the road, but I don't have "DOT" stamped on my lens, so I'm not "legal."

Meanwhile...

Scenario 2: Other Jeeper. Has 4" of lift and "DOT" approved lamps that have not been adjusted for the ride height of his vehicle. He also drives with his fog lights illuminated on a clear summer night - because it looks cool. He's a threat to other drivers on the road, but it's okay, because he has "DOT" stamped on his lamp.

Who's operating within the legal limits of the law?

Read the law, assess your vehicle or hire someone to assess your vehicle, and determine if you're abiding by the law.

https://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/49/571.108[/QUOTETru

I'm not saying whats right or wrong but regarding the DOT stamped lights, a company can not just say it is compliant they have to apply for a certification that states that the beam and light meets DOT standards, now I'm not sure how they come to the conclusion on what meets and doesn't but you can't just say it meets and slap in on the Headlight.

I am not bias either way because I have ran both illegal and legal Leds, but you can find some led total replacement Headlights that have a good beam pattern that want break the bank.
 

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I'm not saying whats right or wrong but regarding the DOT stamped lights, a company can not just say it is compliant they have to apply for a certification that states that the beam and light meets DOT standards, now I'm not sure how they come to the conclusion on what meets and doesn't but you can't just say it meets and slap in on the Headlight.

I am not bias either way because I have ran both illegal and legal Leds, but you can find some led total replacement Headlights that have a good beam pattern that want break the bank.
What is your reference for this statement?

In referencing the same link I posted previously...

S5.8.10Unless otherwise specified in this standard, each lamp, reflective device, or item of associated equipment to which paragraph S5.8.1 applies may be labeled with the symbol DOT, which shall constitute a certification that it conforms to applicable Federal motor vehicle safety standards.

There is no application for certification process.

Also see:

https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/49/30115
 

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I should add that, legally, all headlamps must be marked "DOT" to indicate conformity of the regulations.
Yet you wanted to claim that your non DOT properly aimed headlamps should be acceptable?

Your not making a concise argument.
 

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Yet you wanted to claim that you non DOT properly aimed headlamps should be acceptable?

Your not making a concise argument.
I am claiming that my lamps conform to the regulation set forth in the code. Legally (I suppose this is an exception to my conformity, but not affecting the operation of the lamp) I should take a Sharpie and mark "DOT" on the back of my lamps to indicate conformity.
 

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I think there is still confusion on who is allowed to make the "DOT" mark on a headlamp. The DOT does not certify anything. Jeep, or Hella, or whoever does not design a product and take it to the DOT for their approval. They themselves, the manufacturer, certify it as approved - meaning it conforms to the law. Anyone can do this, including me. I designed and built a product, and I assert it conforms to the law.
 

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I think there is still confusion on who is allowed to make the "DOT" mark on a headlamp. The DOT does not certify anything. Jeep, or Hella, or whoever does not design a product and take it to the DOT for their approval. They themselves, the manufacturer, certify it as approved - meaning it conforms to the law. Anyone can do this, including me. I designed and built a product, and I assert it conforms to the law.
A company who is in compliance with DOT specs will be able to provide you this meaning they applied for certification. If they don't have this then it is illegal for them to say they are DOT compliant
 
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