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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, kinda new to the forum and new to the jeep community. Been lurking on here for a bit, just absorbing the tons of knowledge that you all bring to the site. I own a 2009 JK with 128k. I started the engine an popped the hood and noticed that there was some bubbling, a very slow drip coming from the hose that is connected under the radiator cap, the overflow hose. In any event, my question to you all is that is there typically a clamp at the end of that hose? Mine doesn't have a clamp and was curious if that could be the issue. I am also going to replace the radiator cap tomorrow to see if that does the trick.

Appreciate any and all feedback, as well as patience with my silly/novice question, as i mentioned, I'm a new jeep owner an still learning with the Jeep.
 

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Shouldn’t really bubble, because there is no pressure to speak of unless the hose is pinched or plugged. Could the barb the hose is connected to be separating from the radiator? Pull the hose off and see if is coming from the barb.
 
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Get a clamp...or If there is enough hose you can usually trim the end and put it back on and it will not leak. No pressure there but it does need to seal.
 

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I just found the same issue on my JK a couple of days ago. I used a zip tie until I can get to the store and buy one of those old school hose clamps in the correct size. It's working so far!



 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks gang for the replies, going to grab a clamp at the auto store in the morning, I really appreciate the info.
 

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IF you get a clamp make sure its a spring clamp and not a screw clamp

Or the zip tie works just as well for that hose.

.
 

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What’s wrong with the screw style clamp?
Nothing at all is wrong with a screw clamp.
No way I'd use a spring clamp, they suck.

With that said, I used a zip tie on mine, it's been on there, and working fine since 2012
 

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What’s wrong with the screw style clamp?
The issue with the screw clamp is mainly that the fitting is plastic and a metal screw type clamp could crush it. Also, those metal screw clamps don't always provide the best even pressure.
For a no pressure fitting like that a spring clamp of the right size should be plenty.
 

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What’s wrong with the screw style clamp?
In the old days of metal tanks and nipples on radiators the screw clamps worked fine as the metal could take the pressure of cranking down on the clamp but with the new plastic end tanks and nipples you run the risk of cracking the plastic with the screw clamp especially right under the screw part where it's flatter and not round like the rest of it.

The spring clamps put an equal amount of pressure all the way around the hose and plastic nipple and they work fine as long as you use the right size clamp, you can't put a clamp that's too big on a hose end and expect it to seal correctly.

In a pinch for an emergency repair use what you got but in the end the spring clamps work better on plastic and especially on a small diameter hose like the overflow tube.

.
 

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^ Thanks for the input. Plastic engine parts suck! I learned my lesson on a leaking thermostat bleeder valve. I tightened it down until it broke.



But i did add a screw type clamp on the recirc hose going into the airbox after it popped off. The airbox plastic doesn't seem as brittle as other parts. That plastic stem on the radiator would mean a whole new radiator if it cracked.



I like the zip tie idea too, will do that for non-pressurized fittings in the future.
 

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I use rtv on older hoses, it would stop the leak but the hose might be hard to remove later. Plastic hose niples often have rough seams from molding and might leak even with a new hose. A tiny rtv ring at the edge of the hose will seal the leak and if later the hose needs to be removed rtv ring can be broken with a hose removal tool.
 
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