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Ok so basically my moss green 95' yj has been parked in the sun for a while and the paint on the hood got destroyed (it's only on the hood and the area above). I don't really wanna go to a shop and get it professionally redone so I've come here with ideas on what to do with it. I just want it to look decent.
(I also posted this on reddit a while earlier but I figured I would get better opinions here)
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If you only want it to look "decent", the question arises, "how decent?". You can buy a couple cans of spray paint that are as close in color as you can find, sand off all the loose paint, spot prime any bare metal. You'll want to remove the side hood latches, footman loop, windshield frame bumper loops and cowl grill. Mask off whatever you don't want to cover with overspray and wait for a calm day.
If you have a garage cover anything in there that might be damaged with overspray. If you plan on spraying outside, don't do it in the sunshine.

When you spray the paint, multiple light coats are better than just a few heavy coats. That looks like it might be a metallic color. if so, once you have complete color coverage, you can follow up with clear coat.
It might be a lot easier to paint the hood if you take it off and set it on horses.

I'd use 220# sandpaper on a random orbit sander to sand the paint and any spot primer. If you don't have access to a random orbit sander and want to sand by hand, I'd use 320# wet.
Harbor Freight will likely have an inexpensive random orbit sander and Home Depot or Lower will have the velcro backed sandpaper.

I'd have a can of spray primer and 5 large cans of spray paint color handy to start. You can return the unused paint. If you think you'll need clear coat, I'd have at least 3 or 4 cans handy, maybe more. You really don't want to run of of paint before you're done. Remember, light coats with overlapping passes. As soon as the paint "flashes" go ahead with the next coat. As the paint builds, it will take a bit longer to flash

Don't be shy about asking any other questions.

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If you go to a shop just to get a price, they should tell you to get the hood and cowl panel media blasted. You can do that even if you paint the hood & cowl panel yourself (it will do a better job and save a lot of sanding). If you have the parts media blasted, I'd use a light coat of etch primer on the bare metal, followed up with a couple coats of regular primer surfacer. The primer surfacer will need some sanding but just enough to sand off any rough spots. it can be done quickly by hand.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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Your hood looks worse than mine, but I'm suffering something similar. My paint looks pretty good, besides the clear coat. I "think" I will be wet sanding the hood and using 2k clear on it. I'm sure I will have to wet sand afterwards as well. I haven't done it before but watching online makes it seem doable.
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Welcome to the Forum Biblethumpncop,

You'll need more than clear paint. As you sand all the loose clear coat off, you'll sand through the blue. Once everything is sanded and masked, you'll need enough primer to cover any bare metal and enough blue paint to cover any exposed or sprayed on primer. Once you have a light coat of blue covering the primer, then go ahead with the clear coat. Make sure to understand and follow the instructions on the various containers. Wear a respirator when spraying paint! A 3M dust mask isn't a respirator.

It's better to start small. I'd start by doing the passenger side front fender. I'd remove the flare, repair the dent and the surface rust, then prime the bare metal and paint and clear the fender. By starting small, it'll be easier and you'll get a feel for what to do on the hood.

Good Luck, L.M.
 
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Welcome to the Forum Biblethumpncop,

You'll need more than clear paint. As you sand all the loose clear coat off, you'll sand through the blue. Once everything is sanded and masked, you'll need enough primer to cover any bare metal and enough blue paint to cover any exposed or sprayed on primer. Once you have a light coat of blue covering the primer, then go ahead with the clear coat. Make sure to understand and follow the instructions on the various containers. Wear a respirator when spraying paint! A 3M dust mask isn't a respirator.

It's better to start small. I'd start by doing the passenger side front fender. I'd remove the flare, repair the dent and the surface rust, then prime the bare metal and paint and clear the fender. By starting small, it'll be easier and you'll get a feel for what to do on the hood.

Good Luck, L.M.
Thanks!
 
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