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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a stock TJ with the exception of a More MML and BL and a Savvy gas tank skid and trans case shifter. This summer I added a UCF extra clearance skid. I used a new stock trans mount rather than the Lopro mount so my driveshaft angle is pretty steep, but no vibes. I have a 2" BDS lift to install so looking at the SYE, driveshaft, control arm setup. My question is why can't I install a SS SYE, and with the added driveshaft length, have Tom Wood or someone make me a shaft with slip in the middle but single joint on each end and avoid the cost of 4 control arms and the headache of dialing in the pinion?(headache because I've never done it.) I know if it would work, everyone would do it, but I don't know WHY it doesn't work. Flame if you must but in the end, give me some info I can learn from. Sometimes you can't learn without asking a dumb question or two.
 

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Knows a couple things...
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You wouldn't need four control arms, you'd only need the two rear upper adjustable length control arms. Lengthening the upper arms will raise the pinion angle where it needs to be while at the same time restoring the wheelbase length lost to the 2" suspension lift. Suspension lifts with stock arms shorten the wheelbase.

And there's no headache to dialing in the pinion angle, I can get mine right the first time by just eyeballing it so it's not difficult like it may seem to be. Remove the upper arms, use a jack to raise the pinion shaft so its angle is the same as the driveshaft, then set the length of the upper arms to match the mounting bolt holes and bolt them in.

What you ask about could be done, after all that's how the Rubicon comes configured from the factory... a conventional 2 u-joint driveshaft with a slip-joint in the middle. So you could do that, just don't avoid a CV driveshaft over the pinion angle or thinking you need four control arms to set the angle properly... you don't. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You wouldn't need four control arms, you'd only need the two rear upper adjustable length control arms. Lengthening the upper arms will raise the pinion angle where it needs to be while at the same time restoring the wheelbase length lost to the 2" suspension lift. Suspension lifts with stock arms shorten the wheelbase.

And there's no headache to dialing in the pinion angle, I can get mine right the first time by just eyeballing it so it's not difficult like it may seem to be. Remove the upper arms, use a jack to raise the pinion shaft so its angle is the same as the driveshaft, then set the length of the upper arms to match the mounting bolt holes and bolt them in.

What you ask about could be done, after all that's how the Rubicon comes configured from the factory... a conventional 2 u-joint driveshaft with a slip-joint in the middle. So you could do that, just don't avoid a CV driveshaft over the pinion angle or thinking you need four control arms to set the angle properly... you don't. :)
Thanks Jerry. My thinking was if I do control arms I would rather do all 4 rather than just 2, and my heart is set on the Metalcloaks if I go that route, and they ain't cheap.:) Knew about the Rubicons with the flanged shaft, but didn't know if it works with the extra lift. So is it just 2 ways to accomplish the same thing, or is one much preferred over the other?
 

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Mostly old school..!
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The higher you go, the more you will need the advantage of the double cardan drive shaft. Even on Rubicons, it is often required that the ds be swapped for a cv one as height increases. Don't forget that the lift your drive shaft is seeing is the sum of the suspension lift and the amount your t-cas was raised by the after market skid. If I were you, I would just bite the bullet and do the dc shaft the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The higher you go, the more you will need the advantage of the double cardan drive shaft. Even on Rubicons, it is often required that the ds be swapped for a cv one as height increases. Don't forget that the lift your drive shaft is seeing is the sum of the suspension lift and the amount your t-cas was raised by the after market skid. If I were you, I would just bite the bullet and do the dc shaft the first time.
Yeah, I was just looking to save some money, but most threads I have read, people have said they got a little more than 2" with the BDS springs. I could gain a little back with a Lopro, but still looking at 4" plus at the driveshaft. No cheap way to go. Like you said, bite the bullet. Thanks guys!
 
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