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Ok every so often I can hear a squealing noise and it does get faster as I accelerate, so I suspect a wheel bearing is showing signs of possible failure, so I am going to look into getting those replaced asap, whats the best way to see if I have a Dana 44 vs the 35? I am assuming I have the 35 as this is a bone stock sport.
 

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@Jim74656
Most JK / JKU Sports come with D30's up front and D44's in back.
If a wheel bearing is going bad you will have play in the wheel. Jack it up and see if there is play.
A speed related squealing noise could be a number of things, including worn brake pads. I would check that first, to be honest.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
@Jim74656
Most JK / JKU Sports come with D30's up front and D44's in back.
If a wheel bearing is going bad you will have play in the wheel. Jack it up and see if there is play.
A speed related squealing noise could be a number of things, including worn brake pads. I would check that first, to be honest.
I do know I am coming due for a rear break pad change soon (need to get the time and parts to take the Jeep out of service) and the noise does sound like a metal plate rubbing against something metal in a rhythmic pattern to a degree....so I can agree on possibly the break pads and I am honestly inclined to believe that it is the break pads....would you feel that my assessment is correct?
 

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I do know I am coming due for a rear break pad change soon (need to get the time and parts to take the Jeep out of service) and the noise does sound like a metal plate rubbing against something metal in a rhythmic pattern to a degree....so I can agree on possibly the break pads and I am honestly inclined to believe that it is the break pads....would you feel that my assessment is correct?
It is easy to check. Most brake pads have a "squealer" built in, a little metal tab positioned so that when the pads wear down it starts rubbing on the disk and making a squealing noise. That gives you a warning that your pads need replacing before the metal on metal action starts. So, a squeal like that I would check the brake pads first. Be sure to check both outside and inside pads. The inside pad will often wear faster than the outside pad because it is the one the caliper is directly pushing on.
 

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As the others said, it's much more likely to be brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It is easy to check. Most brake pads have a "squealer" built in, a little metal tab positioned so that when the pads wear down it starts rubbing on the disk and making a squealing noise. That gives you a warning that your pads need replacing before the metal on metal action starts. So, a squeal like that I would check the brake pads first. Be sure to check both outside and inside pads. The inside pad will often wear faster than the outside pad because it is the one the caliper is directly pushing on.
i wouldn't say it sounds like that type of squeal, but again the Jeep could behave slightly different then most cars that I have worked on, I have noticed slight differences anyways.....i'm just going to start gathering my break hardware and what not so I can start doing the pads soon, i'm just going to write them off as bad...
 

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@Jim74656
Most JK / JKU Sports come with D30's up front and D44's in back.
If a wheel bearing is going bad you will have play in the wheel. Jack it up and see if there is play.
A speed related squealing noise could be a number of things, including worn brake pads. I would check that first, to be honest.
Agreed! Always check on or do the free or cheapest things first. When I used to hear the front disk brakes start to squeal or squeak on my '87 YJ, AFTER I checked that the thickness of the pads were OK, I would drive down a very dusty road backwards and forwards for about 100 yards. I would then hit the brakes again at highway speeds. If the squeak or squeal changed at all or went away, I would sand the rotors with a power sanding disk to rough up the shinny spots. That cured the problem 95% of the time.
 
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Agreed! Always check on or do the free or cheapest things first. When I used to hear the front disk brakes start to squeal or squeak on my '87 YJ, AFTER I checked that the thickness of the pads were OK, I would drive down a very dusty road backwards and forwards for about 100 yards. I would then hit the brakes again at highway speeds. If the squeak or squeal changed at all or went away, I would sand the rotors with a power sanding disk to rough up the shinny spots. That cured the problem 95% of the time.
interesting, going to look into that, will start planing on doing a break job soon as a start, how involved am I looking at changing the rear pads?never done it on a jeep, so yea, is this going to turn into an over complicated process like working on a Volvo where I need special tools just to remove things and even more special tools just to put the pads in and calibrate the computer to the new ones? or is this just remove wheel and caliper and plop in new rotor and pads and go?
 

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I replaced the unit bearings on my TJ this summer. I had no indication that they were bad, but was replacing the ball joints, and the axle u-joints while in there. It made no sense to me to put 16 year old bearing with 130K miles on them back in, so I put new ones on.

If it is the small squealer on your brake pads, you would only hear the squealing when you applied the brakes and the squealer made contact with the rotor.

It's not difficult to do a visual inspection of the thickness of your pads.
 
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What is the MILES on this Jeep . My wife has a 2010 Ford Ranger it just hit over 90,000 miles and the brakes look good .
 

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The front brakes on a Jeep generally won't go nearly that far. The bias puts more pressure on the fronts. Of course the type of driving also affects the wear.
 
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my jeep is about 110K (give or take)
I take it you bought it used? Because, there's almost no chance those are the original brakes (at least I hope not!).

I would plan on doing all 4 wheels. You'll want 4 rotors, 4 sets of pads. If your parking brake is OK, don't worry about the drums.

Changing the brakes is easy. Same as most vehicles. You just need a big hammer to knock off the old rotor, basic sockets/spanners, and a large c clamp. There are little clips on each of the lugs that hold the original rotor on. You can toss those as they were only used for assembly.
 

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I have a 18 Hyundai with a squeaky wheel since new, 23000 miles later I couldn't find the source, no play in the bearing, heat shield isn't touching, its somehow related to brake caliper, but is not brake related, (noise wont disappear when brake applied).
Squealing noise isn't necessarily a failing bearing. IMO a failing bearing will quickly progress and noise will become more distinctive and uniform like a low hum accompanied with play.
Before this symptoms I wouldn't touch it.
 

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I have a 18 Hyundai with a squeaky wheel since new, 23000 miles later I couldn't find the source, no play in the bearing, heat shield isn't touching, its somehow related to brake caliper, but is not brake related, (noise wont disappear when brake applied).
Squealing noise isn't necessarily a failing bearing. IMO a failing bearing will quickly progress and noise will become more distinctive and uniform like a low hum accompanied with play.
Before this symptoms I wouldn't touch it.
Agreed, you would get a humming sound when you turn in one direction. This issue the OP speaks about is most likely brakes.
 

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I would plan on doing all 4 wheels. You'll want 4 rotors, 4 sets of pads. If your parking brake is OK, don't worry about the drums.

Note: Pads generally come in sets of 4 pads to do both left and right brakes on one axle. Many web sites show all four pads and clips in their listing, some sites only show one pad but the box will contain 4 along with the needed hardware.

I also replaced my calipers with refurbished ones since they were heavily encrusted and 16 years old. Interesting enough, I had the parts on hand awaiting an opportunity to get the work done when one caliper froze up on a Jeep run.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I take it you bought it used? Because, there's almost no chance those are the original brakes (at least I hope not!).

I would plan on doing all 4 wheels. You'll want 4 rotors, 4 sets of pads. If your parking brake is OK, don't worry about the drums.

Changing the brakes is easy. Same as most vehicles. You just need a big hammer to knock off the old rotor, basic sockets/spanners, and a large c clamp. There are little clips on each of the lugs that hold the original rotor on. You can toss those as they were only used for assembly.
yes I bought it used around 89k give or take, I too would hope these are not original break pads, if so HOLY......


I have done break jobs before (mustang, F250, F150, Volvos) so im not "new" to working on vehicles, I just need to know am I going to need any thing special or can I get away with a 13MM wrench/zip gun with socket, jack and jack stands?


the volvos I know need special tools just to work on the calipers and more modern ones require break sensors and computer resets...


as for the fronts on the Jeep they were just recently inspected (during tire replacement) and they were reported as being perfectly fine, so I am not touching those for now (starting new job so limited on Jeep monies right now) so I am only doing the absolute needed thing(s) for the jeep until I can get some $$$ built up for an overhaul....
 

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No special tools. Probably need a big hammer, since you're in a rust prone area and the rotors can be tough to remove. Just don't open the bleeder valve and you won't get yourself into any trouble.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
No special tools. Probably need a big hammer, since you're in a rust prone area and the rotors can be tough to remove. Just don't open the bleeder valve and you won't get yourself into any trouble. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gmrB7byLqRs
ok cool, glad to know I will be ok with my 13 MM sockets and what not, at the moment (i know this is not a smart way to do it) i'm just doing the pads, I will get rotors later and do those at a later date....I just need the jeep working to get me to my job
 

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ok cool, glad to know I will be ok with my 13 MM sockets and what not, at the moment (i know this is not a smart way to do it) i'm just doing the pads, I will get rotors later and do those at a later date....I just need the jeep working to get me to my job
I hear you. Just make sure the rotors aren't damaged. If the pads wear too much, they start to gouge the rotors and create a lip that will end up ruining the new pads.
 
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