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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey,

I am going to look at a LJ 4 hours away from where I live early tomorrow morning and before I got there, I just wanted to see what people with more knowledge and experience than me thought. Obviously, I will have to look inside the frame as best I can, but should I be concerned that there is bubbling that has either been painted over or coated over around the holes and how much if at all is the body mount (In the picture with the skid plate, the other photo is just for comparison) an issue and how easy would it be to fix that?

Thank you all for your patience if you read that, I know I'm paranoid and it looks beautiful, I just really hope to finally be in a Jeep again but I'm aware that's clouding my judgement.
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Obviously from those pix frame looks great. Bring a hammer n sdriver n bang away on frame. Especially need rear control arms n skid plate. Sdriver should Always bounce off on a solid frame. Good luck ...hope it's solid for you!

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Obviously from those pix frame looks great. Bring a hammer n sdriver n bang away on frame. Especially need rear control arms n skid plate. Sdriver should Always bounce off on a solid frame. Good luck ...hope it's solid for you!

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Should I be concerned at all with that body mount or am I just being paranoid?
 

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I would run just seeing the attempted cover up....Do they have pics of the work they did before spaying it? inside the frame rails is probably your best bet for an accurate assessment. I use a flexible camera for all sorts of inspection before cutting or drilling. if you have an android phone, klein makes a cool inspection camera, at 40 its cheap insurance.
 

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I have seen worse (like Swiss Cheese), but the patch on the front end (above the control arm) makes me wonder...
How bad is the rest of it on the inside; and just how good is that patch?

Anytime you see undercoat sprayed on there, it requires a thorough look to see if anything was covered up just to make the sale.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have seen worse (like Swiss Cheese), but the patch on the front end (above the control arm) makes me wonder...
How bad is the rest of it on the inside; and just how good is that patch?

Anytime you see undercoat sprayed on there, it requires a thorough look to see if anything was covered up just to make the sale.
Oh snap. I didn't even catch that was a patch. What's a good way to tell if it's good or not?

Also, I just rented a boreoscope to look around inside for rot.
 

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Digger is right about that 'patch'. It's a factory thing on all LJs. The frame does look pretty solid. The rust around the outside of the holes isn't a major concern but you should at least get your fingers inside the holes in the frame an feel as much as you can if you can't get a boroscope. The body mount doesn't look too good on the body in the first pic though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So, the place that had the Jeep was super sketchy and I decided to look at another one much closer to where I live. I rented a borescope from autozone (free by the way, if anyone needs one), and looked inside and I mean, parts looked like they had surface oxidation, but nothing in terms of flaking or anything of that nature. I know it's not as clean looking as the other one, but I wonder if that's just because they didn't cover anything with paint. I'm pretty sure it would need the rear main seal replaced from what I've read. I'm hopefully getting it inspected at a shop on Monday or Tuesday. Here are those pictures. This one is about $1500 cheaper than what I was looking at before with room to negotiate. What are everybody thoughts on this one? Anything that stands out? Should I go for it or wait to see if I can find a better one?

Also, thank you al very much for your help! You're all awesome and I appreciate your input!
 

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Digger is right about that 'patch'. It's a factory thing on all LJs. The frame does look pretty solid. The rust around the outside of the holes isn't a major concern but you should at least get your fingers inside the holes in the frame an feel as much as you can if you can't get a boroscope. The body mount doesn't look too good on the body in the first pic though.
OK. Factory engineers must have decided to reinforce that bend in the frame with the added length on the LJ.

Second frame looks decent from the outside. There is some rust around the various seams of the underbody, that you would need to really get in and treat before that gets out of control.

The rear wells on mine had a spritz of undercoat/black paint that looked great when I bought it, but hid some rust that was starting on the panel inside the wheel wells. The body and frame looked great. Four years later, I have a fair amount of rust forming in the seams underneath that I'll have to address before things deteriorate any more.

Unless you see for yourself in person, it is hard to tell if someone actually did a decent job treating the rust or just made it look good enough for a quick sale. Sometimes the evil you can see is easier to deal with than something that is covered up! Maybe you would be better getting the one that is not all covered up. At least you can see the problem areas and take care of them yourself and done the way you want.

On the other hand, maybe the owner of the first one was really on top of things and really took care of it. Tough call...
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
OK. Factory engineers must have decided to reinforce that bend in the frame with the added length on the LJ.

Second frame looks decent from the outside. There is some rust around the various seams of the underbody, that you would need to really get in and treat before that gets out of control.

The rear wells on mine had a spritz of undercoat/black paint that looked great when I bought it, but hid some rust that was starting on the panel inside the wheel wells. The body and frame looked great. Four years later, I have a fair amount of rust forming in the seams underneath that I'll have to address before things deteriorate any more.

Unless you see for yourself in person, it is hard to tell if someone actually did a decent job treating the rust or just made it look good enough for a quick sale. Sometimes the evil you can see is easier to deal with than something that is covered up! Maybe you would be better getting the one that is not all covered up. At least you can see the problem areas and take care of them yourself and done the way you want.

On the other hand, maybe the owner of the first one was really on top of things and really took care of it. Tough call...
Wow, thank you, that was very detailed. I don't know anything about welding and I think the seams you were talking about would be a bad place to start. How difficult and/or expensive is it to address them properly?
 

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Wow, thank you, that was very detailed. I don't know anything about welding and I think the seams you were talking about would be a bad place to start. How difficult and/or expensive is it to address them properly?
You wouldn't be welding anything that I can think of. You would be crawling around underneath with wire brushes on a drill, abrasive flap discs, maybe a pneumatic needle scaler tool. Removing all the rust you can reach, then applying a rust converter or applying something like Rust-O-Leum or P.O.R. 15 (Paint Over Rust) paints to encapsulate what is left and prevent new rust from forming.

It is the type of thing that is ridiculously expensive to have a shop do for you. It can be done as DIY, with time and patience. Paint and supplies are not all that expensive.

I procrastinated, now I am paying the price in facing more work to be done because I just could feel the urge to get in and do that miserable job of tackling rust remediation. You can certainly DIY. Just get into all those areas where panels join or overlap, clean and paint.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
You wouldn't be welding anything that I can think of. You would be crawling around underneath with wire brushes on a drill, abrasive flap discs, maybe a pneumatic needle scaler tool. Removing all the rust you can reach, then applying a rust converter or applying something like Rust-O-Leum or P.O.R. 15 (Paint Over Rust) paints to encapsulate what is left and prevent new rust from forming.

It is the type of thing that is ridiculously expensive to have a shop do for you. It can be done as DIY, with time and patience. Paint and supplies are not all that expensive.

I procrastinated, now I am paying the price in facing more work to be done because I just could feel the urge to get in and do that miserable job of tackling rust remediation. You can certainly DIY. Just get into all those areas where panels join or overlap, clean and paint.
Oh yeah! That's manageable for sure! I saw some rust (and I really wish I took a picture) up by the bumper that I was concerned about. kinda on the fold that I thought you were talking about.
 

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I'd be more concerned with the payments on a JL than a little rust on an LJ. I recall driving my '61 Ford crew cab up into Needles Basin left off Yankee Boy Basin and observing the rocks passing under the gas pedal. Didn't concern me in the least.
 
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