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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everybody, I just recently purchased an '01 sport that is 99% stock(wheels and tires are aftermarket) and I went to my mudding spot with it, however when I got there it was way too rutted for the jeep to handle. Anything over just basically crawling through made it feel like the jeep was gonna start to flip. Now of course I'm brand new to jeeps, my past vehicles were all 1/2 ton trucks so they were much bigger and absorbed all the bumps much easier.

What are some easy methods to improve the offroad stability of my jeep?

Right now its stock height with 265/70/16 tires, and my original thought was to go with wider tires and wider wheels with a more negative offset that way the track width would increase, along with adding new shocks all around to better control the uneven terrain.

I really do not want to lift the jeep at all, however I would do it if it meant the difference between a 31x10.5 tire and a 32x12.5 or 13.5 tire
 

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Disconnect the front sway bar OFF ROAD ONLY. The ride will be way better and improve your off road capability. Reconnect before you go back on public roads otherwise it's dangerous.
 

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Give it a little time before you do anything. You are sitting high in the jeep but the jeeps actual center of gravity is pretty low. I have had my stocker leaned over pretty far and it was fine. I have seen some leaned over way farther than I would ever be comfortable with and still keep all 4 tires on the ground. Like suggested, disconnect the sway bar and it will soften the ride a lot.
 

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Hey everybody, I just recently purchased an '01 sport that is 99% stock(wheels and tires are aftermarket) and I went to my mudding spot with it, however when I got there it was way too rutted for the jeep to handle. Anything over just basically crawling through made it feel like the jeep was gonna start to flip. Now of course I'm brand new to jeeps, my past vehicles were all 1/2 ton trucks so they were much bigger and absorbed all the bumps much easier.

What are some easy methods to improve the offroad stability of my jeep?

Right now its stock height with 265/70/16 tires, and my original thought was to go with wider tires and wider wheels with a more negative offset that way the track width would increase, along with adding new shocks all around to better control the uneven terrain.

I really do not want to lift the jeep at all, however I would do it if it meant the difference between a 31x10.5 tire and a 32x12.5 or 13.5 tire
Disconnect the front sway bar OFF ROAD ONLY. The ride will be way better and improve your off road capability. Reconnect before you go back on public roads otherwise it's dangerous.

Bigger and wider tires will make a HUGE difference...however you can not go much bigger than 31"s without either lifting the Jeep or cutting the fenders/ body, one or the other.

If you go all BL the "tippy feeling" will only get worse. Discoing the front end will help immensely.

After I went to 33"s and wheels with 4" BS my TJ felt very stable...so much so that for the last 2 years I drove it fully discoed all the time. While it is not GENERALLY recommended, I never had an issue. a lot of local Jeepers run that way. However it does take some, "getting used to".

The disadvantage once you get above 31"s you generally need to have AT LEAST 4.10 gears if manual, I had 4.88s and really was happy with that set up.

Unfortunately one "MOD" generally requires 2 or three more to work well, and perform as well if not better than stock.

Generally Jeeps are not "fast" and crawling is what they do best!!
GOOD LUCK!!

(helpfull Pic)
 

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Give it a little time before you do anything. You are sitting high in the jeep but the jeeps actual center of gravity is pretty low. I have had my stocker leaned over pretty far and it was fine. I have seen some leaned over way farther than I would ever be comfortable with and still keep all 4 tires on the ground. Like suggested, disconnect the sway bar and it will soften the ride a lot.
The reputation that the TJs have around these parts is that they are far more easier to flip than other off-roaders, not really sure where that came from.
 

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One way would be wheel spacers, widen your tire width a bit as well. Anything with a wider stance should be more stable. If you plan on a lift, do a lower center of gravity lift ( 2 inch lift with 33's ) or something similar. Disconnect the sway bars when wheeling, and don't add to much heavy weight to the top of the jeep. Other then that they are fairly stable rigs, I am running 35's with 6 inches of lift currently ( cutting it back to 5 inch ) and have no issues with stability
 

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The reputation that the TJs have around these parts is that they are far more easier to flip than other off-roaders, not really sure where that came from.
That reputation came from the older CJ-5s, and carried over on early CJ-7s, and that was mainly due to them being extremely narrow and come stock with big V-8s.

You have to remember that most people look at your Jeep and see the exact same vehicle their grandfather or great-uncle had way back when. Jeeps today can corner better than a lot of mid-range cars and the center of gravity, even on a lifted Jeep is lower than you might think.

Also, a body lift doesn't raise your center of gravity, unless you get a 6" or more body lift, and even then it would be a just barely kind of deal, your engine (even my 2.5) and your transmission and TC & frame weigh many times more than your tub and roll bar.
 

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I have a hunch that you were no where near tipping over on the way to the muddin' hole. If you really want to increase your off road stability, then you want to install an Antirock sway bar. Its much better than being disconnected.
 

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The more you follow people through trails and get used to the feeling you'll get while noticing they don't roll or flop over on the side, the more you'll understand your TJ is not tipping over nearly as much as it feels like it is.

I took my wife on a very gentle beginners trail so as to not scare her, and the first time the Jeep tipped just a little to the side, she started screaming/crying/freaking out screaming we were going to roll over. We honestly were barely at any kind of an angle. I stopped the Jeep and helped her out to walk to the rear of the Jeep so she could see that we were barely at any angle at all. That calmed her quite a bit, she was ok after that. It's just a matter of getting used to it.

And just for grins, here's a photo of a TJ that didn't roll or tip over. I couldn't find the pic of another TJ I wanted to post that makes the angle of the below TJ look like nothing. :)

 

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That's pretty close to a 45* angle there!
 

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The reputation that the TJs have around these parts is that they are far more easier to flip than other off-roaders, not really sure where that came from.
Because CJ5s would roll over if you looked at them wrong. I know at least five people who rolled one and one of them died doing it. The CJ looks very much like a TJ. I get it all the time about how dangerous they are. Nobody ever told me my JK was dangerous but then most thought I had bought a new Liberty and did not recognize it as a Wrangler, come to think of it, neither do/did I. My TJ corners flat and feels better than my JK did. I think my Teraflex Dual Rate S/T anti-sway is partially responsible, the wider track from the 3.7 BS wheels and tires helps too.
 

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I know I feel a lot more secure driving my lifted Wrangler than my wife's stock Grand Wagoneer.
 

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I have owned and taken off road 2 Grand Cherokees (95, 05), a Cherokee (xj 98), and 3 wranglers (95, 00, 01). I wouldn't think of taking any of the aforementioned SUVs on anything that made them "list" to one side the way I have my various wranglers. I did some things in my old xj that made my butt clench and gave the passengers a decent view of the ground out of their window, but not the extreme "holy shit" that wranglers are capable of.

FYI, I never flipped any of my Jeeps (big J), so one could argue that I never tested the limits. But when it comes to rolling, homey don't play that.
 

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I have owned and taken off road 2 Grand Cherokees (95, 05), a Cherokee (xj 98), and 3 wranglers (95, 00, 01). I wouldn't think of taking any of the aforementioned SUVs on anything that made them "list" to one side the way I have my various wranglers. I did some things in my old xj that made my butt clench and gave the passengers a decent view of the ground out of their window, but not the extreme "holy shit" that wranglers are capable of.

FYI, I never flipped any of my Jeeps (big J), so one could argue that I never tested the limits. But when it comes to rolling, homey don't play that.

I don't blame you. I had quite a few "pucker" moment in my 79 Cherokee WT. The Wrangler just feels more secure and "sure on it's feet", so to speak.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Wow I feel a lot safer now seeing those wheeling pics lol. I guess my main concern that night was the shocks wouldn't be able to handle all the bumps at once then the jeep would catch an edge of the rut and flip over. But I'm definitely liking the idea of a lot wider stance as right now my tires are about even with the factory fender flares
 
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