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My '90 has a factory scissor jack mounted on the right fender well.
There is an instruction sticker there as well as a pic of the jack.

Three bolts hold the entire package.
If you have three holes on top of the well, something from a junker would mount there.

Pkg = bracket, scissor jack, lug wrench, handle pieces.
(mine was a little loose when I got the jeep, cranked up tight and no rattles)
 

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My '92 has a scissor jack on the passenger fender in the engine bay


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I have 2 complete jack assy from a pair of 91's. They are the scissor style. If you're interested shoot me a PM.
 

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My 89 also came with no jack. It's lifted and will soon have 33" s on it. I'm not sure how effective a bottle or scissor jack would be
I'm probably going with a Hi-Lift. It can also be used easier for recovery.


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The Hi-Lift isn't the best jack for changing a tire. It just isn't stable enough.

My 1987 came without a jack, but had the bracket for a scissor jack. I got a jack from a local fellow that parts out Jeeps and builds off road vehicles.

For changing tires, your best bet is use an original bottle or scissor jack under the spring or axle and a block of wood. When I go out on the trails, I bring a 12" X 12" piece of 3/4" plywood and a short length of 4X4.

I have 31s and my spare tire would destroy my tailgate, so for daily driver duty I carry a can of Fix-A-Flat. For the trail, I toss my spare in the back where my back seat used to ride or if I feel particularly strong, I strap it down in my roof rack.

The Hi-Lift is great for recovery. There are many accessories to make it even better. I bring a chain and a come along besides all the other gear in my recovery tool box.
I haven't had to use my winch yet.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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The Hi-Lift isn't the best jack for changing a tire. It just isn't stable enough.

My 1987 came without a jack, but had the bracket for a scissor jack. I got a jack from a local fellow that parts out Jeeps and builds off road vehicles.

For changing tires, your best bet is use an original bottle or scissor jack under the spring or axle and a block of wood. When I go out on the trails, I bring a 12" X 12" piece of 3/4" plywood and a short length of 4X4.

I have 31s and my spare tire would destroy my tailgate, so for daily driver duty I carry a can of Fix-A-Flat. For the trail, I toss my spare in the back where my back seat used to ride or if I feel particularly strong, I strap it down in my roof rack.

The Hi-Lift is great for recovery. There are many accessories to make it even better. I bring a chain and a come along besides all the other gear in my recovery tool box.
I haven't had to use my winch yet.

Good Luck, L.M.


Thanks LM, you just saved me about $100.
Ima start sourcing what I need, your list is very helpful.
What did my 89 come factory with, bottle or scissor?
Also, anyone have a pic of what it's supposed to look like mounted under the hood?

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Either one should work well for you. If I were to find both available and they were priced the same I would choose the bottle jack because it's somewhat easier to operate. I have a scissor jack and I plan to never have to use it.
That said, I'll probably have a flat on my next trip into town.

I don't have any pics of my jack mounted at this time. Once you find a jack with the bracket and operating gizmos, it will be easy to see how it all goes together on your passenger side inner fender apron.

A Hi-Lift jack is a handy item to have on the trail. Attached are a couple pics of when I first got my Jeep and prior to painting it. I used two 2 1/4" muffler clamps that cost about $10.00 for the pair.
I don't run a back seat, so I don't know if mounting the jack in this manner will interfere with the seat. The jack is now mounted level and high enough that I can slide a pair of large plastic tubs that carry my camping gear under it. I have a hard top and that keeps the jack out of the weather.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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Anyone know where to find a stock scissor jack kit, my 89 has the empty space, I would make my own bracket and add one. Does anyone know where to get the bracket to hold the jack or how to make one?
 

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Anyone know where to find a stock scissor jack kit, my 89 has the empty space, I would make my own bracket and add one. Does anyone know where to get the bracket to hold the jack or how to make one?
Try Sargentjeep on Facebook.



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A couple months ago another poster discovered a 4 way lug wrench that packs down to a single bar. It's around $30.00 at O'Reillys. My jack had some surface rust and I had planned to paint it "someday". I bought the 4 way lug wrench and that gave me the motivation to paint my Jack. I'm sorry that I don't remember the poster that originally posted the original thread to the lug wrench. For $30.00 it's one of the cheaper and more useful mods for our Jeeps.

Pic #1- is how the lug wrench comes packed. It's called Power Torque 14" Lug Wrench click on pic #1 to see how the wrench works.
Pic #2 is the rusty jack
Pic #3 is painting the jack.
Pic #4 is the jack back in place with the lug wrench secured in the jack bracket and kept from rattling by the bungee cord.

When you buy the jack, be sure to ask the seller to include the rest of the tools and the two piece bracket. The bracket assembly is the base that attaches to the passenger side fender apron and a strap that goes over the jack and holds the jack and the tools in place. The bracket has two rubber inserts that hold the tools from rattling.

Good Luck, L.M.
 

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