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i changed my tires from stock 29" to Duratrac 33"two days ago. I drove my jeep in snow for the first time. Got stuck behind traffic lights twice and my jeep was sliding and slipping all over the place. I went to an empty parking lot to test my jeep and even going at 20 km/h when i hit the brakes my jeep stops after sliding for a good meter. Is this normal? I mean for gods sake we only had 4 inches of snow and my jeep got stock behind a traffic light! Turns are horrible, the jeep pulls left/right while im driving on snow, it stops a meter away when i hit the brake.
I tried going into 4W and that improves the pulling significantly but not the stopping distance.

Im starting to think its the duratracs but i read so many good reviews about it. How's that even possible?

I'm confused. Anyone have any idea what might be wrong? I actually took a video which i will upload tomorrow.

I have a 2015 auto 3.2!
 

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What tire pressure are you running? If too high you are losing contact with the surface of the road. Pulling left and right may seem more than before and that's because it is. You're trying to push/pull a tire through the snow that's at least an inch wider than before. Also depending on maneuvering your traction control may be the cause of some issues.
 

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Duratracs are all terrain tires and not snow tires --accordingly they will not perform as well as snow tires. They will be better then all season tires but once again they are limited in their snow performance. Also a lot will depend on the type of snow your are driving on. For example traction will be better on cold dry snow then it is on wet slushy snow--also tire width will also effect your traction. Pizza cutters are better then wide tires for driving on snow depths typically encountered on road ways--unless you are in real deep snow and need flotation.
 

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Sorry to hear about your duratracs. As said prior, check your pressure. Over inflation can cause what you are experiencing.
I am running Nitto trail grapplers 285/75/17. Cold pressure is set at 26 lbs and I had no issues with slipping or sliding and did not need to go in 4wd at all.
 

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The 2 door will also be squirly compared to other vehicles because it's so short. If your not paying attention you could end up facing backwards quite quickly. 4x will not help you slow down.
 

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I I purchased my duratracs in the beginning of December 2014. 4 days after getting them I was in northern mn during a snow storm and I had the same experience you are having. Now that I have 3000 miles on them I wouldn't trade them for anything. It still pulls in the snow ruts but I attribute that to the tire being wider. But the traction is now awesome. Not sure if they need to get "broke-in" or what. Maybe it just needed to get some heat cycles on them. Regardless I'm happy with them now. My buddy has them on his vehicle and never had issues but he purchased his in the summer. Just my opinion. Hope they improve like mine did.
 

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The tires will not make your jeep stop better. Remember that you're driving a heavy vehicle with not the best brakes. It's going to take a while to stop in snow...drive accordingly.

As for the sliding around, use 4HI if the roads are slick and you shouldn't have much issue unless you're driving too fast. I have the same tires as you do and I feel like the jeep is glued to the roads in the snow, even in the 16" we had here recently. Good luck!
 

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I tried going into 4W and that improves the pulling significantly but not the stopping distance.
Did you really expect the Jeep to stop better because you were in 4H? I hope not, your from Canada for Pete's sake.

You must have taken it out on a really bad day. My Jeep will stop on a dime with 6" of snow on the ground. I have the stock tires with homebrew sipes. However, just yesterday we had 6" on the ground with some 10w40 underneath it. Even my wife's super handling all wheel drive and winter tires car was all over the place.
 

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jrheim hit it. You need to drive them a few hundred miles to scuff the surface of the tire. Brand new tires are slick until they're broken in and you've worn off the mold release substance used in the manufacturing process.
 

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They are just tires, not magical devices, and in snow not much better then stock. If you are able to pull away from a dead stop, and corner in the snow, then you are fine. You aren't going to become Mario Andretti because the the mystical Duratracs are on your Jeep. Plus from the pictures it looks like you have wider than stock tires, which isn't helping anything. Personally, I run with the stock Rubicon tires, and haven't had any issues yet. Keep in mind its a Jeep, not a Subaru or Audi, it will perform worse then those two AWD systems in the snow or ice. Just make the best of what you got, and adjust your driving to what the Jeep can do safely.
 

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Look into dedicated snow tires. Nokian is an example. Nokian Tires - The best winter tires for northern conditions / Nokian Tires

Depending on your local laws you could run dedicated winter tires with metal studs. I run studded nokian hakkapeliitta 8's. been very impressed. Some places don't allow the studs, But have also ran non studded versions of those tires with great results.

Look up some of the winter tire reviews on youtube, there are other top brands as well.
 

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Downshifting and upshifting can help slow down also

I have km2s(mt with no sipes) and I was coming up to a stop about 150 ft away and the snow went from pretty light on the road to a few inches where the braking happens.

I start sliding and wiggling a bit? You bet. Usually i will left off the gas and downshift. The auto stick is nice that. In this case, just pulled it into 4hi, got some control back and was able to stop.
 

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I've had exceptional traction with my duratracs in the snow and slick roads, at least 3-4k miles on em..... FYI, I run at 35psi, once it got below 15 degrees out, the are all at about 33psi.....
 

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Both my wife and i have the studded nokian hakkapeliitta 8's on our Jeeps and they are by far the best winter tire ive ever had. They are pricey BUT for safety sometimes you really do get what you pay for.
 

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Sipping your tires is a cheap easy way to improve your existing tires. They also make them last longer as they will run cooler in the summer. It is easier to chunk them on rocks
when sipped but I have never had an issue. First cars in the ditch are always 4wd. Traction off the line gives them confidence but they don't turn or stop any better. Slow down and up shift if you have a manual. Run a gear taller so you don't have huge compression braking when you let off. I prefer a stick in the snow because you have much more control. 2 doors are short and like to spin- Why I love em:). In any Jeep the back is light. Add some weight. Sand bags or kitty litter. 200lbs makes a huge difference. If get stuck on ice just open a bag or two, pour a couple of long lines in the snow after you stomp out a path and you are good to go.

1 Rule one is slow down! I break that rule often usually towing snowmobiles but have
have 100,000's of miles of experience in the cold wet stuff. I also follow the other
rules.

2. Stay home if it is that bad. Where are you going thats worth your life or a family
members. The farther south you live the more important this rule becomes!

3. Slow down! You may be a great driver but there are lots of idiots out there that are
not. They are on bald tires and speeding to go by crack!

4. Know your rig. You have no business out there at all until you go to the mall parking lot or open field and see how you rig stops and handles in the snow! Really your out
there obviously driving to fast for conditions and your surprised how your Jeep
handles on ice? Really. Mix it up with few 3 ton cars or maybe a few light weight
semi's. See how that works out for you.

5 Prepare your rig for winter! Scrapper and brush. Not a credit card and drive looking
through the mail slot. You need to see better as there are more idiots like you are
coming who can't see and arespeeding to go by crack! Tires with the proper inflation
for the conditions. Don't trust your tire shop. They pump them up to max usually.
Have gloves,boots, blanket, shovel, some food just in case. Its just smart even if
you are the one thinking of leaving your rig on the off ramp and walking home in your
loafers.

6 Add weight to rear over the rear wheels. Jeeps are light in the ass end unless its
loaded up. 2 doors are really bad this helps a great deal-try it. Bags of sand or cat
litter work perfect. Can also be used for traction on ice. Chain up and you go
anywhere a Zamboni will. But go slow! Seen skiers headed up the hill doing 60 with
chains on- well until one brakes anyway and then watch the spinning begin.

7 Think about your route! If it doesn't snow much where you live this is important.
Stay off the step hills and go another way. Think about it! Seattle hills when it snow
is great entertainment. I park a block away and set up cam at the bottom of a sleep
and watch the entertainment. They are often speeding to boot and you know on the
way to buy crack.

8 Leave 5 times the space and distance from the the other yahoo's. They are most
most likely to do something stupid and take you out. Leave lots of room gives you
options. Hopefully option you have practiced in an empty parking lot prior to
speeding in the first snow fall to go buy crack.

9 Everything you do at the wheel should be at 25% of normal speed. Same for the
pedals. Slow and easy, no sudden movements even if a panic situation.

Slow down and be safe. Better yet stay home until the roads get better. Why? People out there are worse then you, they are speeding and what are they going to buy?
 

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Living in the mountains of CO, I have driven in a LOT of snow. The far northern indigenous peoples are said to have 100 words for snow - that is because snow is variable. Studs are the only reliable way to conquer ice - tires like Blizzaks are pretty close, but NOTHING beats a studded tire on ice. But guess what? Studs do nothing on soft snow. For that you need a tire with deep tread and side lugs.

The two most important things besides tread are air pressure and WIDTH. Drop pressure into the 20s, just be sure to air up again before going highway speeds. The second one is the most common thing I see in Colorado: people put huge wide tires on their Jeep, and then wonder why they suck in snow. If you asked 100 people, 85 would probably think that wider tires are better in snow, but this is NOT the case. You want NARROWER tires in snow, to increase the weight per square inch of contact patch of the tires on the snow. Pizza cutters are the way to go for snow.
 

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Living in the mountains of CO, I have driven in a LOT of snow. The far northern indigenous peoples are said to have 100 words for snow - that is because snow is variable. Studs are the only reliable way to conquer ice - tires like Blizzaks are pretty close, but NOTHING beats a studded tire on ice. But guess what? Studs do nothing on soft snow. For that you need a tire with deep tread and side lugs.

The two most important things besides tread are air pressure and WIDTH. Drop pressure into the 20s, just be sure to air up again before going highway speeds. The second one is the most common thing I see in Colorado: people put huge wide tires on their Jeep, and then wonder why they suck in snow. If you asked 100 people, 85 would probably think that wider tires are better in snow, but this is NOT the case. You want NARROWER tires in snow, to increase the weight per square inch of contact patch of the tires on the snow. Pizza cutters are the way to go for snow.
Yep~ what he said^ I had to learn about the "wide" tires the hard way...
 

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Not trying to be a jerk but it's four wheel drive, not stop.
 

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Sorry to hear about your duratracs. As said prior, check your pressure. Over inflation can cause what you are experiencing.
I am running Nitto trail grapplers 285/75/17. Cold pressure is set at 26 lbs and I had no issues with slipping or sliding and did not need to go in 4wd at all.
Agreed. I have 285/65/18 Trail Grapplers and even though I heard they suck in the snow, they've actually been great. Have rarely ever needed 4WD with them in all this snow we are getting in the Northeast.
 
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