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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 17" JKUR Hard Rock, the vehicle came equipped with AEV 2.5" lift, on 35"s with AEV geometry correction brackets.

I got the jeep in February, since I have outfitted the the rig to make it more trail ready. I've added a front winch with steel line,gobi roof rack with a smittybuilt RTT, AEV rear bumper with a tire carrier ( I also put water in it), metal flat fenders and aluminium fender liners, high lift jack and etc.

I packed the rig up with recovery gear, tools, cooler and etc and headed out to Drummond Island over the Labor Day weekend.








Jeep performed beautifully. However, loaded up with all the accessories, gear, food and water I am definitely over the AEV recommended 250 lbs above stock weight limit, and I could feel it driving the jeep.

I am perfectly happy with the lift height and the over all capability of the jeep.

What would be some options to increase the load capacity aside from going to another lift? I started doing some research and I came across Old Man Emu 2620 2.25" Lift Rear Heavy Load (660lbs) Coil Spring. What are your thoughts on adding those springs to my existing set up? Has anyone run this combo?

I should mention that 99% of the time the jeep serves as a daily, I keep the rack on while I remove the tent and other stuff. I am looking into building a rear drawer which will add weight back in.

Feedback is greatly appreciated.
 

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My two cents....
Heavier springs will not ride as well without the load. Especially if they are straight rate springs.
Another option is helper air springs.
A third option is stiffer springs, like MetalCloak springs. But when you aren't heavy you may not like the ride as much.
 

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There are lots of people that go with AEV and end up switching to OME once they load up their rigs.

OEM has three different rated springs for the back and two sets for the fronts.

rated as follow: (4door models)

FRONT:
2627 No Load
2616 Medium Load
2628 Heavy Load (winch and bumper)

Rear:
2617 (called by them medium load)
2618 (constant Load 150 kgs = 330LBS)
2620 (Heavy load 300kgs -600 lbs)

Most of the people buy the kits and they really dont know which specific springs came with it. I will give it a try with the medium load if it still sags return them and go with the heavy load.

Some other go the route of heavy load springs and adjustable shocks (rancho Rs9000) or if budget is not an issue OME BP51's
 

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I have almost exact setup although on stock steel bumpers on the Hard Rock. But heavy considering we travel as family of four. My experience are the bilsteins are a bit underdamped for the weight which is prohably the "heaviness" you are feeling. Since then i've replaced the shocks with Falcon shocks and cant say enough about how much better composed the jeep is on the trails. I swear i did not hit the bumpstops at all and i tried. No more crazy side-to-side sways!

I also added 3/4 spacer up front and 1/2 rear to get some extra height back once loaded.

Anyway, my thought process is use the least spring rate for the ride height you need with the kind of load you are carrying, and choose the right shocks for it. If you change to stiffer shocks only, you may end up still with an overwhelmed shocks which results into a sloppy mess.

Just my 2cents.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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That makes me think of a good point / question. What makes you think it is under-sprung?
How much it sags under weight is the main determination in whether or not the springs are stiff enough for the load they are carrying. If it is not sagging too much, but simply moving around too much while driving with all that weight it may be more of a shock issue.
I am told the Bilsteins that AEV uses are stiffer, with more dampening than the normal off the shelf Bilsteins. But as mentioned, the Bilsteins are not an overly firm shock and if you need a firmer shock there are options out there. The TF Falcons are one option, or Fox would be another. You could even move up to an adjustable shock.
 

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I’m surprised that a company would recommend exceeding the GVWR at all.

Maybe go to a CAT scale and get a good weight, fully loaded and a tank of fuel as a starting point. That will give you a baseline to begin adding/removing weight, and also tell you the axle weights.
 

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I’m surprised that a company would recommend exceeding the GVWR at all.

Maybe go to a CAT scale and get a good weight, fully loaded and a tank of fuel as a starting point. That will give you a baseline to begin adding/removing weight, and also tell you the axle weights.
Aev does not recommend exceeding gvwr, they recommend using the 2.5 if adding up to 250lbs to your stock rig ie bumpers and gear. Funny thing is most of us are over gvwr as soon as put 35’s and bumpers on and add a passenger and jump in the driver seat.
 

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Aev does not recommend exceeding gvwr, they recommend using the 2.5 if adding up to 250lbs to your stock rig ie bumpers and gear. Funny thing is most of us are over gvwr as soon as put 35’s and bumpers on and add a passenger and jump in the driver seat.
^^^^^ This is a fact. Forget the numbers. After all they're nothing but numbers. I'm over them with just me and my everyday gear and my 2 1/2" AEV lift does just what I expect of it when I finish loading it for a trip. Yes you can change shocks and definitely go to bigger track bars and a bunch of other stuff but what are you really going to gain? Most of us spend thousands of dollars and hundreds of hours searching for unicorns until we decide it's just time to accept what we have and enjoy the trip. It's probably simpler and cheaper to just figure out how to lighten the load since most of the crap we haul never gets used anyhow. :drinks:
 

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Part of the problem is where the weight is. A gobi rack and rtt puts that weight at top which puts more dynamic forces to that suspension. That is when you can really feel the weight on the trails.

Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Aev does not recommend exceeding gvwr, they recommend using the 2.5 if adding up to 250lbs to your stock rig ie bumpers and gear. Funny thing is most of us are over gvwr as soon as put 35’s and bumpers on and add a passenger and jump in the driver seat.
Absolutely.

The Gobi rack are over 200 lbs alone!

I tried to keep it as light and as minimalistic as possible, all things considering. The set up is pretty basic; front Hard rock bumper, winch, gobi rack with RTT, rear aev bumper with tire carrier, rc flat metal fenders. What I packed;
- basics tools and recovery gear ( 150 pc mechanic tool set, tree straps, shackles, snatch block, noco boost XL power bank / jump starter)
- High lift jack mounted to the cage in the back
- cage mounted small fire extinguisher, cage mounted medical kit
- Coleman cooking stove with two small camping size propane bottles
- aluminium collapsible camping table
- 50 qt rotomolded bear proof cooler - I used frozen plastic bottles of water so that I am not wasting weight on ice packs
- 5 gal of drinking water, 5 gal of water in the AEV bumper
- 2 camping chairs
- small camping light and some mosquito spray candles, camping cooking utensils and camping cooking set, disable plates and etc.

I could leave the high lift behind but its one of those insurance things. When you need it, you really need it.

I called AEV and talked to two different gentlemen there; the recommendation was to upgrade to their 3.5" Inch lift kit as that has more room. I worked in motorsports for a number of years so I really appreciate all of the development and testing they put into their products to deliver great performance, Including matching spring rates with custom shock valving. As you can imagine, I am really not all that enthused to spend $2k plus on an all new lift kit, that only marginally improves the weight carrying capacity of the rig. I also already have the procal and the geometry brackets and those two come included in the new kit and cannot be separated out.

Right now, I'm leaning towards giving OME spring a try.
 

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As mentioned above, the Bilsteins are not a good choice for a heavy rig. You are headed the right direction on springs in my opinion. The OME heavy paired with something like the Falcon 3.1 shocks for 1.5-2.5 would be a huge upgrade.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
As mentioned above, the Bilsteins are not a good choice for a heavy rig. You are headed the right direction on springs in my opinion. The OME heavy paired with something like the Falcon 3.1 shocks for 1.5-2.5 would be a huge upgrade.
Those Falcon are a great set of shocks. I've also read some great things about their (Teraflex) Outback suspension kit. The combo with the shocks is a bit steep in terms of pricing.
 

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Just to update everyone.

In the end I ended up going with Falcon 3.3 shocks ( I was able to find for sale new in opened box locally at 50% off retail) and paired the shocks with Teraflex outback spring set ( TeraFlex - JK 2-Door 3" Lift – JKU 4-Door 2.5” Lift: Outback Rear Coil Springs - Pair). The shocks were the shorter 2.5 lift version. I talked to Teraflex and they said that was the right shock to run vs the longer ones.

I recently took the jeep put to the Rendezvous in the Ozarks which is a 650 mile drive from Chicago. I just have to say that I simply couldn't be happier with the suspension set up. I added even more weight to the rig with the addition of a DYI drawer system in the rear and the jeep drove phenomenally both loaded up and empty. The rig just feels more planted and stable. I highly recommend the set up.
 
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