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I just changed the rear brake pads on my 2013 JKU for the first time this morning. Now, I have probably done 50 or so brake jobs so I have lots of experience doing this. But these brakes were incredibly easy to change. Once the wheel is removed, you remove the top bolt on the caliper and the caliper rotates down out of the way and the brake pads come right out. From the time I walked out the door to start taking out my tools to the time I walked back into the house, it took 28 minutes total. :locked:
 

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I just changed the rear brake pads on my 2013 JKU for the first time this morning. Now, I have probably done 50 or so brake jobs so I have lots of experience doing this. But these brakes were incredibly easy to change. Once the wheel is removed, you remove the top bolt on the caliper and the caliper rotates down out of the way and the brake pads come right out. From the time I walked out the door to start taking out my tools to the time I walked back into the house, it took 28 minutes total. :locked:
How many miles? I have a 2011 and hopefully they are the same set up. I have 43,000 miles but they are highway. Just trying to get an idea of time of expected failure and replacement.
 

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I just hit 40,000 miles and the pads were looking a little thin so I went ahead and changed them. There was still about 1/8" of pad left so I could have gone another 5,000 miles or so. I do lots of city driving.
 

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No special piston compression methods? I remember some old VWs had to have the piston "screwed" in or the like.

I'm either really hard on my clutch or really easy on brakes as I'm at 50k and the pads have a lot of life left in them.
 

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Pads are a cake walk on these things. The damn rear rotors will make you curse and throw things. I managed to blow through the factory rears at 23k. Pads were past the squealers and rotors were gouged up pretty bad. Fronts still have plenty of meat left.
 

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Pads are a cake walk on these things. The damn rear rotors will make you curse and throw things. I managed to blow through the factory rears at 23k. Pads were past the squealers and rotors were gouged up pretty bad. Fronts still have plenty of meat left.
Why are they so hard? The machine screws holding them on? We just drilled those out last time I helped someone with brakes lol.
 

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No special piston compression methods? I remember some old VWs had to have the piston "screwed" in or the like.

I'm either really hard on my clutch or really easy on brakes as I'm at 50k and the pads have a lot of life left in them.
No, the piston just pushes in. A lot of people use a large c-clamp to push the piston back in. I bought a tool that is made specifically to compress the piston back into the rotors. You can buy this tool at any auto parts store. They only cost around $10. This is what it looks like.

 

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Why are they so hard? The machine screws holding them on? We just drilled those out last time I helped someone with brakes lol.
Replacing the rear rotors can be a pain because the emergency parking brake is located inside the hat part of the rotor and sometimes you will have to turn the little star adjuster wheel to move the emergency brake pads in to release the rotor.
 
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