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As anyone experienced any power gains of fuel milage increases? Just purchased a 2014 4dr JK
 

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In my experience, the only gain from a standard K&N filter drop in is just increase intake noise and a lighter wallet. I have heard some say maybe a slight MPG bump of maybe a half to a full MPG, but I suspect it is more a placebo affect than anything.
 

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Read a few of the recent threads on air filters and CAIs. They have some good discussion.

No increase in power, fuel economy, cash in your wallet or anything else useful from these filters.

The new generation of stock filters is quite good.
 

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K&N's have been known to dust turbos in 7.3's, I'm going to pass on putting one in a jeep.
 

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K&N's have been known to dust turbos in 7.3's, I'm going to pass on putting one in a jeep.
In any FI application I would never use a K&N type filter unless it was a race vehicle and getting rebuilt after each race. Even a 10 micron piece of dust hitting a turbo vane and 100,000 rpms will leave a mark.

I also am not using one in my Jeep, reason air filters are cheap. A clean stock filter will flow just as good as a K&N or any aftermarket air filter. Where the K&N type filter shines compared to stock paper filters is the flow numbers do not fall off has the filter gets dirty unlike the stock filter which does. The trade off is you potentially let in more dirt.

I have run plenty of K&N filters though over the years and have not had any issues with all of my vehicles going over the 200K mark and a few over 300K. During that time I have lived in all different climate types from rain forest to desert. No issue for a N/A vehicle.
 

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One thing I do ponder about the K&N drop in would be if it would potentially help with small amount of water that could be ingested.

Just thinking the oiled filter would be somewhat water resistant..... any ideas?

I have been a fan of K&N in the past, mostly because I just like reusing them again and again.
 

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Engine gains don't work that way.

Increasing air flow only makes a power/economy gain if there is a bottleneck being opened up. That's not happening here. The computer doesn't care what filter you use as long as it provides more than X cubic feet per minute of air (does anybody know what the 3.6 draws at WOT?). A K&N will meet that, but so does pretty much any other filter on the market. This is ONE of the reasons why you won't get any gains from a filter, or a CAI.
 

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Engine gains don't work that way.

Increasing air flow only makes a power/economy gain if there is a bottleneck being opened up. That's not happening here. The computer doesn't care what filter you use as long as it provides more than X cubic feet per minute of air (does anybody know what the 3.6 draws at WOT?). A K&N will meet that, but so does pretty much any other filter on the market. This is ONE of the reasons why you won't get any gains from a filter, or a CAI.
^ well informed and knows what he's talking about!

.
 

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^Not likely. Again, only if it fixes a problem...in this case the problem would either be a lousy intake runner length (which is not a problem in this engine) or heat-soak. The idea there is that the extra space provides a heat barrier to keep the intake tube cooler. Highly unlikely to be an issue. They're more effective in carbed engines where they run a little hotter and boil off the fuel in the carb bowls. That's obviously not an issue for us.

^ well informed and knows what he's talking about!

.
I'm gonna print this out and carry it in my wallet.
 

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^Not likely. Again, only if it fixes a problem...in this case the problem would either be a lousy intake runner length (which is not a problem in this engine) or heat-soak. The idea there is that the extra space provides a heat barrier to keep the intake tube cooler. Highly unlikely to be an issue. They're more effective in carbed engines where they run a little hotter and boil off the fuel in the carb bowls. That's obviously not an issue for us.
Oh God... my hero!

I'm gonna print this out and carry it in my wallet.
:funnypost:

.
 

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One thing I do ponder about the K&N drop in would be if it would potentially help with small amount of water that could be ingested. Just thinking the oiled filter would be somewhat water resistant..... any ideas? I have been a fan of K&N in the past, mostly because I just like reusing them again and again.
You know what's more water resistant? The stock filter with a snorkel. You really can't get better than that...
 

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Engine gains don't work that way.

Increasing air flow only makes a power/economy gain if there is a bottleneck being opened up. That's not happening here. The computer doesn't care what filter you use as long as it provides more than X cubic feet per minute of air (does anybody know what the 3.6 draws at WOT?). A K&N will meet that, but so does pretty much any other filter on the market. This is ONE of the reasons why you won't get any gains from a filter, or a CAI.
Actually the gains you see with running a K&N type filter is over the life of the filter. Paper filters start to fall off from there first use and only continue to get worse. K&N's will continue to flow at near peak for many more thousands of miles, they don't fall off as quickly. The stock filter by far protects better, just change it more often.

Or better yet figure out how to mount a Donaldson Power Core filter like the one used in the Duramax Diesel or Corvette, a very large filter in a small package. Hopefully over the winter I will figure out now to mount one.
 

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^Not likely. Again, only if it fixes a problem...in this case the problem would either be a lousy intake runner length (which is not a problem in this engine) or heat-soak. The idea there is that the extra space provides a heat barrier to keep the intake tube cooler. Highly unlikely to be an issue. They're more effective in carbed engines where they run a little hotter and boil off the fuel in the carb bowls. That's obviously not an issue for us.
I think the jury is out here because we have not had really anyone taking a look at our setup and determine if a spacer is good or bad. And I don't think we will every get an answer because we are not aiming at faster 1/4 mile times.
 
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